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Collated articles relevant to Aqua-tnet, the EU Erasmus Lifelong Learning Thematic Network for Aquaculture, Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management (www.aquatnet.com)
Curated by John Bostock
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Cambridge Journals Online - Parasitology - Abstract - Economic costs of protistan and metazoan parasites to global mariculture

Cambridge Journals Online - Parasitology - Abstract - Economic costs of protistan and metazoan parasites to global mariculture | Aqua-tnet | Scoop.it

Parasites have a major impact on global finfish and shellfish aquaculture, having significant effects on farm production, sustainability and economic viability. Parasite infections and impacts can, according to pathogen and context, be considered to be either unpredictable/sporadic or predictable/regular. Although both types of infection may result in the loss of stock and incur costs associated with the control and management of infection, predictable infections can also lead to costs associated with prophylaxis and related activities. The estimation of the economic cost of a parasite event is frequently complicated by the complex interplay of numerous factors associated with a specific incident, which may range from direct production losses to downstream socio-economic impacts on livelihoods and satellite industries associated with the primary producer. In this study, we examine the world's major marine and brackish water aquaculture production industries and provide estimates of the potential economic costs attributable to a range of key parasite pathogens using 498 specific events for the purposes of illustration and estimation of costs. This study provides a baseline resource for risk assessment and the development of more robust biosecurity practices, which can in turn help mitigate against and/or minimise the potential impacts of parasite-mediated disease in aquaculture.

 

John Bostock's insight:

Congratulations to Andy Shinn and his co-authors on this massive review of the economic impact of parasites on mariculture. This should be widely read by students of aquaculture for its contribution to risk assessment and management, but also by investors and policy makers who might decide to allocate a little more resource to research and health management...

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John Bostock's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:52 AM

The economic impact of aquatic animal parasites and disease is very poorly documented, so this is a major and very welcome contribution from Andy Shinn and colleagues 

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Scottish Government - An Assessment of the Benefits to Scotland of Aquaculture

Scottish Government - An Assessment of the Benefits to Scotland of Aquaculture | Aqua-tnet | Scoop.it

A New independent report shows the Scottish aquaculture industry ‘provides considerable benefits for fragile economic areas’  contributing up to £1.4 billion to Scottish economy.


"The report commissioned by Marine Scotland and the Highlands and Islands Enterprise has been published by Imani and SRSL. 


The economic benefits from the industry are wide ranging and are felt across Scotland including areas that are not traditionally associated with it such as the Central Belt.


The report estimates that if the 2020 industry production target of 223,000 tonnes is met it could have a turn-over value of £2 billion to the Scottish economy and support 10,000 jobs.


Other findings include:

Direct production alone contributed a turn-over of at least £550 million to the Scottish economy and 2,800 jobs in 2012Including added income across the country the industry is currently estimated to contribute a turn-over of £1.4 billion and 8,000 jobs in ScotlandSignificant improvements have been made to the environmental impact of the industry and compares well with other animal production industriesQuality and high value is Scottish aquaculture’s trump card"
John Bostock's insight:

This may be a bit parochial, but a welcome study on the Scottish Aquaculture Industry that will provide good insight into the industry and economic factors for all students of aquaculture

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New reports on the economic performance of the EU aquaculture sector

New reports on the economic performance of the EU aquaculture sector | Aqua-tnet | Scoop.it

(06/12/2013) Two new reports on the economic performance of the EU aquaculture sector are now available on the website of  the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF)

 
John Bostock's insight:

Excellent data and analysis of the European aquaculture sector 

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European Parliament Report: Implications of a larger EU aquaculture sector

European Parliament Report: Implications of a larger EU aquaculture sector | Aqua-tnet | Scoop.it

This report, authored by staff of the European Aquaculture Society, The Federation of European Aquaculture Producers and University of Stirling Institute of Aquaculture, examines future projections for EU aquaculture development and the potential economic and ecological consequences, and suggests further policy options.

Weblink: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2014/529084/IPOL_STU(2014)529084_EN.pdf

John Bostock's insight:

I have to declare a personal interest, but this report should provide some useful perspectives for anyone with a study interest involving European aquaculture and more broadly aquatic food production

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The Rising Cost of Not Going to College

The Rising Cost of Not Going to College | Aqua-tnet | Scoop.it

For those who question the value of college in this era of soaring student debt and high unemployment, the attitudes and experiences of today’s young adults—members of the so-called Millennial generation—provide a compelling answer. 

 

On virtually every measure of economic well-being and career attainment—from personal earnings to job satisfaction to the share employed full time—young college graduates are outperforming their peers with less education. And when today’s young adults are compared with previous generations, the disparity in economic outcomes between college graduates and those with a high school diploma or less formal schooling has never been greater in the modern era."

John Bostock's insight:

This study is from the USA, but suggests the qualification bar for accessing better paid employment is by and large going up. (Thanks to Sonia for passing this on...)

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