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The Collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008

The Collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008 | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
In September 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The company became insolvent with finances totalling $639 billion in assets and debt worth $619 billion; it became the largest bankruptcy in history.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, March 3, 2015 9:16 PM

The aim of this case study is to discuss the case of fall of Lehman Brothers which enjoyed several years of the glorious past and reach to a financial tragedy leading to its collapse in 2008. The crucial part of the question that “Why did Lehman Brothers fall?” 


The bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers had brought a devastating effect for economies and the financial markets worldwide. The fall of Lehman Brothers was not just a banking failure but it was far more and had its effect in the worldwide economy. This was a human failure that leads to the greatest tragedy in the field of investment and real estate market and lead to a severe financial crisis and global recession.

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Analysis of "Do More" Advertising Campaign by American Express

Analysis of "Do More" Advertising Campaign by American Express | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Created by ad agency Ogilvy & Mather, ‘‘Do More’’ aimed to convey all the advantages AmEx could offer, ranging from its numerous charge and credit cards to travel services and financial-planning assistance.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, April 26, 2015 12:08 AM

The American Express Company (AmEx) was long associated with the celebrities whose appearance in print campaigns was meant to position ‘‘membership’’ in its credit-card brand as the domain of a privileged few. But AmEx’s elitist brand image became a serious hindrance in the 1980s and 1990s. Rivals such as Visa U.S.A. and MasterCard International had been using their own marketing to exploit the fact that their card brands were accepted more universally than AmEx, and by 1996 their gains had significantly eroded AmEx’s market share. The launch of a new umbrella advertising campaign tagged ‘‘Do More’’ was not just the debut of new creative concepts; it marked a concerted attempt to reposition the AmEx brand.
Created by ad agency Ogilvy & Mather, ‘‘Do More’’ aimed to convey all the advantages AmEx could offer, ranging from its numerous charge and credit cards to travel services and financial-planning assistance. The company also used ‘‘Do More’’ to broaden its consumer base, employing celebrities, such as Tiger Woods and Jerry Seinfeld, who appealed to consumers across demographic and income boundaries. The umbrella effort had various incarnations and encompassed several individual campaigns through 2001. AmEx typically spent between $170 million and $200 million on U.S. credit-card advertising during these years.
AmEx gained market share in the first two years that ‘‘Do More’’ ran. Difficulties in later years were reversed by the introduction of a new card appealing to young adults, a product whose existence itself was a measure of the evolving nature of the AmEx brand. ‘‘Do More’’ did a great deal to bring about and to publicize this evolution, and many of the hallmarks of this repositioning campaign—including the continued participation of Tiger Woods and Jerry Seinfeld—were visible in the advertising that followed its discontinuation in 2002.

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21st Century Learning and Teaching

21st Century Learning and Teaching | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Related articles to 21st Century Learning and Teaching as also tools...
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Dragon Dictation

Get Dragon Dictation on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
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ShowMe - The Online Learning Community

ShowMe - The Online Learning Community | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
ShowMe is an open online learning community where anyone can learn and teach any topic. Our iPad app lets you easily create and share video lessons.
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“Imagination At Work” Ad Campaign by General Electric

“Imagination At Work” Ad Campaign by General Electric | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
General Electrics “Imagination At Work” ad campaign made a change in consumers’ perceptions of GE: more people were viewing GE as a high-tech company rather than as a relic from the smokestack eras.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, April 25, 2015 11:58 PM

Since 1979 General Electric Co. (GE) had relied on one of the most successful branding slogans in history: ‘‘We bring good things to life.’’ But along the way the company had become almost exclusively associated with its lighting and appliance products, which by the end of the twentieth century represented only a small percentage of the company’s business. With the installation of a new chief executive, Jeffrey R. Immelt, who replaced the legendary Jack Welch, the company decided to rethink its branding in order to better position GE as an innovative and forward-looking company. The result was a new slogan, ‘‘Imagination at work,’’ which became the focus of a campaign aimed at consumers, business partners, and investors as well as GE employees. The $100 million ‘‘Imagination at Work’’ campaign, developed by BBDO Worldwide Inc., began in January 2003. In addition to TV spots, it included print ads and Web elements. The advertisements simultaneously repositioned the brand and directly promoted one of GE’s many businesses. In one commercial, for example, Lassie, the heroic canine star of vintage TV and films, warded off a cougar with an array of karate moves as a way to talk about GE’s security technology. In time the campaign also spread to Europe and Asia. Despite taking some criticism for dropping ‘‘We bring good things to life,’’ GE expressed satisfaction with the campaign and continued to build on it. Market research detected a change in consumers’ perceptions of GE: more people were viewing GE as a high-tech company rather than as a relic from the smokestack era. Moreover the new slogan became something of a rallying cry within the company, spurring on employees to make innovative contributions.

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Nissan's Successful Turnaround Under the Leadership of Carlos Ghosn

Nissan's Successful Turnaround Under the Leadership of Carlos Ghosn | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
The presented case study is about a challenging turnaround of the Japanese car manufacturing company Nissan under the leadership of Carlos Ghosn.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, April 26, 2015 12:18 AM

Nissan has been successfully competing in the automobile industry through decades, but in the early nineties they reached a critical point with severe losses and debt. The Nissan brand was loosing its value, and a turnover was urgent for the company to survive. Nissan got an alliance opportunity with Renault, which resulted in Carlos Ghosn taking over, as the first non-Japanese Chief Operating Officer in Nissans history. The task at hand for Ghosn was not easy, but he came to Japan with a vital revival plan hoping to succeed. When Carlos Ghosn took over Nissan in 1999, the company was on the brink of disaster, with a staggering $22 billion debt, slumping sales, a declining image, etc. Just one year later, the automaker was profitable once again. By 2001, debt had been whittled down to $4 billion, operating profit was at a record high, and the popularity of the brands new models surpassed all expectations.