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ISIS and the U.S. Presidential Election

The United States is already taking some steps to roll back the Islamic State (ISIS) and restrict its resources and recruits, including airstrikes, armin

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2016 9:51 PM

This is a non-partisan post and a video that is fairly balanced; this video nicely lays out some of the cultural and political factors that the next president of the United States should consider when crafting foreign policy in the especially problematic Middle East.  

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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Remembering September 11th

Video and Photographs of the event. All media is from the internet and not my own. I compiled all media from the internet and edited them together to tel

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2016 3:14 PM

The compilation above was created by a teacher who realized that now none of his students were alive to remember how emotional it was for people to watch the horrific news unfold.  Additionally, this video of how Canadians helped the U.S. paired with this lesson plan from the Choices Program will help students explore the human dimension of the September 11 attacks as will this lesson from Teaching History. For a geospatial perspective on 9/11, this page from the Library of Congress, hosted by the Geography and Map Division is a visually rich resources (aerial photography, thermal imagery, LiDAR, etc.)  that show the extent of the damage and the physical change to the region that the terrorist attacks brought.  The images from that day are a part of American memory and change how the event is remembered and memorialized in public spaces (if you want a touching story of heroism, the Red Bandana is moving). 

 
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 10, 2016 11:16 PM
Because many students were not born when 9/11 occurred, or don't remember, it is important to have sources like this available.  Take a moment and look at this information about this time in U.S. history.
James Piccolino's curator insight, January 31, 6:20 PM
I was only between 4 and 5 years old on September 11 2001. I admittedly do have trouble recalling that day. I seem to remember having my kindergarten class cancelled for that day as I was in the afternoon class, but I did not know why. By what my father has told me, many people thought the world was coming to an end. He told me his experience of that day when I was young but still long after the event, and he told me with a level of emotion that I never saw him speak with of anything else. What fear my father had, and the world had on that day, stuck with me after I had heard it. I do vaguely remember visiting the site somewhere around 2003 or 2004 I believe. What I saw was not the beautiful memorial site there is today, but a collection of chain link fencing and concrete. The fences were covered with memorials, flowers, pictures and papers. This video, accompanied with that sadly fitting piano rendition of Mad World, reminds me of what I almost was too young to know. This combined with the realization that as of this month there are adults who were born in the 2000's brings the realization that there are people who may not be able to "never forget" what they never knew. This is why it is important to always educate young people on the past, of dangers, of terrorism, and where they have brought us to now.
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Where ISIS Gained and Lost Territory This Year

Where ISIS Gained and Lost Territory This Year | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Islamic State has lost 14 percent of the territory it held in January, according to a new analysis.

 

Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict.


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Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World

Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
At least a dozen countries have had attacks since the Islamic State, or ISIS, began to pursue a global strategy in the summer of 2014.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, November 21, 2015 3:41 PM
The Paris attacks from ISIS are now being discovered as linked to other attacks that ISIS has planned out. They have up until now according to the article, done 'lone wolf' attacks and now are changing to bigger and city kind of attacks across the globe. They are taking over much of the Middle East and Africa, in hopes to make that area chaotic enough to start more global conflict and another world war, accoring to the article. There have been studies and research in tracking ISIS and they have found that attacks in many other cities in the world have been inspired by ISIS as well.
Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:23 PM

These maps were very helpful in understanding the spread and threat of ISIS. It also helps the understanding of just what a wide range of places they have attacked is. They are capable of striking much of the world in the name of fundamentalism. However, the video of Muslim's chanting is one of those things that can kind of turn down the fear, especially of admitting refugees, that has gripped much of the world. We are as safe as we can be, but idea's are bulletproof and there's no end in sight to the elimination of Islamic Fundamentalism.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:55 AM

Read this article and fill out your Socratic seminar question sheet for the inner/outer circle on Tues, Dec 8

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Border Walls

Border Walls | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

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Boston and Syria

Boston and Syria | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, April 21, 2013 11:49 PM
I came to find out that this was photoshopped, but the message still read the same, except it was Arabic.
Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:03 PM

certainly a powerful picture. as horrible as the Boston bombings were how can anyone imagine living through violence like that day in and day out.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:18 PM

"Boston bombings represent a sorrowful scene of what happens every day in Syria. Do accept our condolences". These words were posted on a banner that was made by some citizens of Syria after the Boston Marathon bombing. Notice the background of the picture. It does not look like a happy place. It almost looks as if the building behind them may have been bombed. After all, the citizens do tell us that bombings happen to occur every day in Syria. Even though they live a torturous life like this day in and day out, they still felt the need to send their condolences which was very respectful. As I look at this picture more and more, I noticed that all of the people holding up the sign are male. Maybe this has to do with the bombings in such that they maybe all lived in that building in the background. It is amazing to me that despite their world being bombed day after day, some are cracking smiles, they manage to hold up their countries flag, and hold their hands up with peace signs.

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Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2016 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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Five stories you should read to understand the Brussels attacks

Five stories you should read to understand the Brussels attacks | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

A series of coordinated attacks in Brussels on Tuesday morning killed dozens and injured hundreds. ISIS claimed responsibility for the devastation — an attack that some have been warning for years would be possible. To really understand all that's happening in the Belgian capital, we recommend you read these five stories.


Via Ken Feltman
ApocalypseSurvival's insight:
Can we understand?
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Ken Feltman's curator insight, March 22, 2016 7:04 PM
Can we understand?
ApocalypseSurvival's curator insight, March 26, 2016 8:31 AM
Can we understand?
Jesus Sandoval's curator insight, March 28, 2016 8:18 PM
I came upon an article titled Five stories you should read to understand the Brussels attacks which, of course, has to do with the recent acts of terrorism in Brussels. Recently Brussels' Zaventem Airport and a metro station were attacked with explosives, causing great panic among everyone; not only in Brussels, but world wide. Just like the Paris attacks, Brussels became a trend all throughout social media. That is why this article called my attention. This article had 5 links to other articles that had content related to Brussels and I took the pleasure to click on one that stated Turkey’s Erdogan warned of Brussels terror just days before it happened which caught me by surprise. If it is true that Erdogan warned Brussels about a possible attack, why didn't brussels warn their residents? Or possibly they did, but not enough. I know that it isn't possible to keep every single individual safe, but I believe the government should have done everything in their power to keep everyone as safest as possible. Other links led to articles that stated: Why is Brussels under attack?, A decade ago, she warned of radical Islam in Belgium’s Molenbeek, and so on. It is obvious that Europe is undergoing a serious raid of terroristic attacks. God forbid that anymore happen, not only in Europe, but worldwide. The audience for this article, I believe, is everyone. I would want as many people as possible to know about the little information that the media does not show about these attacks. The link also shows a powerful clip about the aftermath of the explosives. I just cannot understand how and why people find pleasure in terrorizing others.
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ISIS: A New Threat

ISIS: A New Threat | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

In this lesson, students will:

Explore the role of ISIS in the Middle EastInterpret political cartoons on the U.S. response to ISISIdentify the techniques used by cartoonists to express political opinionMonitor the news media coverage of ISIS over time
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2015 12:29 PM

The Choices Program produces some great materials and this is from their Teaching with the News series.  The newest in the series is a resource guide for the terrorist attacks in Paris.  


Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict, geopolitics, ISIS, Choices.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:32 PM

Guerras

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Police: Up to 6 Paris terror suspects may still be at large

Police: Up to 6 Paris terror suspects may still be at large | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
PARIS (AP) — Police believe as many as six terror-cell members may still be at large after the Paris attacks, one of whom has been spotted driving a car registered to the widow of one of the slain attackers. Two French…

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More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities

More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"This week's Boston Marathon bombing fit with the norm of U.S. terrorist events and threats in one important way: it occurred in a major city. American concerns about terrorism, however, seem to ignore that pattern...There’s a divide on people’s thoughts about terrorism. People that live in places most likely to be hit by terrorism seem the most sunny about the country’s anti-terror prospects and efforts. And those in rural places,  are more concerned and pessimistic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 2:01 PM

This article cites data from the PEW Reseach Center that implies that city dwellers seem to feel less dread about terror threats than their suburban and rural counterparts, despite the fact they live in the primary target zone (see full size infographic here--note that the data was assembled before the Boston Marathon attack).  


Question to Ponder: Why are the Americans most vulnerable to terrorist attacks the least concerned with terrorism? 

 

Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, infographic, urban.

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In Fact, the U.S. Has Been Winning the War on Terror

In Fact, the U.S. Has Been Winning the War on Terror | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Terror in the United States have evolved since 1970: once the tool of left-wing radicals, then right-wing radicals, terrorist attacks are now uncommon, often unsuccessful, and not nearly as deadly.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:02 AM

While terrorism is being discussed in the media as a rising trend in the United States after the Boston Marathon, the statistics don't show that analysis to be true.  This resources compiles maps, charts and graphs so you can evaluate the historical terrorist patterns for yourself.


Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, media.