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Thirsty Yet? Eight Cities That Are Improbably Running out of Water

Thirsty Yet? Eight Cities That Are Improbably Running out of Water | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The amount of rainfall a place gets isn't the only factor in how much water is available to it. These major urban areas show how dire the coming global freshwater shortage could get.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 2016 3:58 PM

Seen from space, this planet is a blue marble, a world where the surface is dominated by water.  The Pacific Ocean alone is nearly half of the surface area of our planet.  Add in polar ice caps and the rivers and lakes, we can see that water profoundly impacts Earth.  Yet most of that water is salt water (97%) and two-thirds of our non-salty water locked away in ice sheets (2% of the global water). Everything else, rivers, lakes, marshes, aquifers, and reservoirs represent that remaining 1% of the Earth's water supply--and that 1% of water is what sustains human settlements and allows for agricultural expansion.  The geography of this 1% is highly uneven and a huge water crisis can cause governments crumble--the fact that this precious resources has been wasted and polluted becomes more frustrating as water resources are being strained in so many places.  In this article, it  describes 8 major metro areas where water is being depleted rapidly -- Tokyo, Miami, London, Cairo, Sao Paulo, Beijing, Bangalore and Mexico City. 

 

Tags: urban, water, land use, megacities, urban ecology, consumption, environment, resources.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 24, 2016 8:24 AM
Seth Dixon has another "uh oh!" article.
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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:08 PM

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.

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Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World

Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Urbanization has led to what are known as mega-cities, cities with a population of over 10 million people. These mega-cities have become so large that they often lead to terrible pollution, traffic, and extreme poverty.

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Erik Seglem's comment, March 15, 2013 11:22 AM
This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.
Sally Egan's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:17 PM

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area). 

 

 This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis. 
 
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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.