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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.


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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 5, 2:34 PM
Not to make a joke of a serious situation, but I almost cannot function when the weather hits 80 degrees and I value air conditioning as much as oxygen sometimes (I am a baby when it comes to heat).  So the fact that people in New Delhi and the surrounding areas had to deal with temperatures of 122 degrees makes me cringe and sweat just thinking about it.  This article brings up some interesting points about how sometimes the weather can reveal the shortcomings of a society.  First of all, the fact that people actually died because of heat says to me that the government was not prepared to deal with this type of crisis.  There wasn't adequate resources to give people the necessities of water and shelter when facing such high temperatures.  It seems like in this type of heat people probably cannot function as they normally can, so it seems like a system should have been better prepared to keep people indoors and hydrated.  Another flaw of the government that is revealed in this type of weather is poor infrastructure.  The article says that the electrical grids of cities are being overwhelmed by air conditioning use and wide outages were possible.  In an area with a high population and the potential of facing such extreme weather, there should be more of a priority placed on repairing and maintaining electrical grids and wiring.  The high heat also exposed that the roads weren't built to sustain this weather because it literally started melting.  This unfortunate incident in India shows that humans can control a lot these days, but the weather is still untouchable.  The best way to deal with extreme weather is to be better prepared to face it.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 1:31 PM
(South Asia) India, with the second largest population in the world and a developing infrastructure, often faces heatwaves due to its climate. But recently the heat, spurred by climate change, led to hundreds of deaths. There is no doubt that there are more deaths than can be reported due to the country's largely isolated and rural populations. In this article from 2015, the temperature reached 122 Fahrenheit. The heat causes numerous urban problems, such as  power outages due to ACs and melting roads, but most deaths typically happen in poorer areas.
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 6:50 PM
India is facing a change in their physical geography as climate change continues to prove itself to be a real problem. The amount of energy being used to air condition homes is astounding and the government is worried of massive power outages. "India's power industry has long struggled to meet rapidly rising demand in Asia's third largest economy, with poorly maintained transmission lines and overloaded grids." Physical geography can effect the economy as well. 
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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 5:17 PM
This page tackles the problem of the lack of toilets in India. There are many comedians poking fun at the serious issues, which is not uncommon for comedians. Unfortunately these are serious issues, people are dying, especially children. 24% of girls drop out of school due to lack of proper toilets. Hopefully these comedians bring more light to the issue so it can begin to be addressed more seriously. 
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:58 PM

This is perhaps the most intriguing map I've been able to analyze. Could it be possible that more people live in that circle than out of it? The world is HUGE and to think the majority of the population resides here, is truly incredible. India, has a huge population living in there for such a small area. Currently, India has over 1 billion people living there making it the second most populous country before China with 1.3 billion. China has a bigger surface area than India and it is interesting to know how these areas compare. The important issue with India is the fact that, with so many people, there is a lack of housing and sanitation unavailable to provide to so many people. The facts are giving that India suffers from overpopulation, clearly, this image has to be true.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:48 PM

We have learned that the Himalayas are growing everyday while our Appalachians in the united states are shrinking. What does this all mean? In the platonic spectrum it means in Nepal, earthquakes.

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Access to safe drinking water is a physical and human geography issue because it all depends on location. For example, in Dhaka, a heavily populated area, fresh water is limited. Besides waters/rivers in Dhaka being polluted, this is a poverty filled area and government funds can only get so much for people. Dhaka is a poor, urban, and populated community.

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.