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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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The Next America

The Next America | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.

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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:41 PM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 21, 2014 9:14 PM
Unit 2 population and migration
This article explains the u.s. population change and how it's birth rate is lowering. In America the CDR was officially greater than the CBR for the first time ever. This was specifically for white people though. This article is a good example of a developed country entering stage 5 on the DTM.
This article relates unit 2 because it shows how the population in America is declining as a nation. This also proves how migration is what is sustaining the American population. The Crude death rate is finally higher than births on an odd occasion meaning America is entering stage 5 of the DTM.
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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster [Jonathan V. Last] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers. Look around you and think for a minute: Is America too crowded?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2013 9:36 PM

I have yet to read this book, but the title alone says that it could be an intriguing supplemental text for a unit on population (or an 'opposing viewpoint' to consider).  For those that have read the book, please comment below. 


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:36 PM

I really wasn't sure where to put this scoop. There may be a time when the GMOs affect our fertility as many think GMOs are affecting herds fed GMOs. The physical environment might affect this as well. The social and economic challenges may impact fertility and plain selfishness and putting industrial needs over human needs could affect it as well. It looks like an interesting book so I thought I would make note of it.

Tara Cohen's comment, May 1, 2013 2:58 PM
I ordered this book from Amazon because I thought it would be a great fit for AP Human. I read the first 20 pages last night and was blown away. It totally covers all the information in the Demography Unit and the author has a sense of humor. Only 20 pages in, but I give it two thumbs up!
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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:58 PM

This is perhaps the most intriguing map I've been able to analyze. Could it be possible that more people live in that circle than out of it? The world is HUGE and to think the majority of the population resides here, is truly incredible. India, has a huge population living in there for such a small area. Currently, India has over 1 billion people living there making it the second most populous country before China with 1.3 billion. China has a bigger surface area than India and it is interesting to know how these areas compare. The important issue with India is the fact that, with so many people, there is a lack of housing and sanitation unavailable to provide to so many people. The facts are giving that India suffers from overpopulation, clearly, this image has to be true.

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.