APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 16, 8:40 AM
These graphics are examples of propaganda, which has been used for hundreds of years. Great Britain leaving the EU was a big deal as it was basically GB saying that they were better than the rest of Europe. These graphics show what different sources around the world thought of Brexit. The one that stood out to me was the picture of the woman who appeared beaten up and the captions stated that it was the EU with and without GB, and this shows that GBs influence is not nearly what it used to be and that Europe can survive without it. 
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Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015

Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015 | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
It is quite significant that extremely high fertility figures are now mostly confined to tropical Africa, with only a few exceptions (such as Afghanistan and East Timor).

Via Seth Dixon
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In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 2016 10:56 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Jean-Michel Crosnier's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:25 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 2016 10:52 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?

Via Seth Dixon
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Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 2016 10:52 AM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 2016 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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The Economy Depends on Good Geography Instruction

The Economy Depends on Good Geography Instruction | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"Geography-related jobs—a sector that features high salaries and low unemployment—will grow rapidly over the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment of geographers is projected to grow by 29 percent from 2012 to 2022, compared with an anticipated 11 percent increase for all occupations. Employment of geoscientists is projected to rise 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, and a 14 percent increase is expected for surveying and mapping technicians. Yet, the American Geosciences Institute's 'Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014' report predicts a shortage of around 135,000 geoscientists by the end of the decade.  We are not preparing our young people to claim these jobs and advance innovative ways to use technology."


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Do you feel that the United States should make a greater commitment to geography education?  You can learn how to make your voice heard in Congress through this campaign from the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2016 11:56 AM

Do you feel that the United States should make a greater commitment to geography education?  You can learn how to make your voice heard in Congress through this campaign from the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). 

wereldvak's curator insight, March 25, 2016 11:40 AM

Do you feel that the United States should make a greater commitment to geography education?  You can learn how to make your voice heard in Congress through this campaign from the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). 

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Amid economic concerns, the U.K. considers an EU exit

"The U.K. has been a member of the European Union for more than 40 years, but that partnership might come to an end amid British concerns over eurozone turmoil and the ongoing refugee crisis. British voters will soon hold a referendum to decide whether or not to exit the EU. Judy Woodruff talks to Steven Erlanger of the New York Times for the possible implications of a U.K.-EU split."

MsPerry's insight:

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 27, 2016 6:26 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:30 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Special APHG Edition of the Journal of Geography

Special APHG Edition of the Journal of Geography | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"The special APHG issue of the Journal of Geography (Volume 115, Issue 3) has 11 articles that are all focused on APHG."


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MsPerry's insight:

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 2016 8:12 AM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 3, 2016 12:04 PM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 7:54 PM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGEAPHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

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Alexander von Humboldt

"Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned geographer and South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt’s major accomplishments and why we should care about them today. See this TED ED lesson plan that accompanies the video."


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APHG-U1 Environment 

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 6:39 PM

I had not heard of Alexander Von Humbboldt before watching this video. He is said to be one of the most amazing scientists to ever live. More places around the world have been named after him than any other person. His name was lost in history so this is why many people are not familiar with him. He started off as a geologist, then he began a scientific five year journey from 1799-1804. His journey was long, dangerous at some times, and very interesting to hear about. He travel through mountains, across oceans, and through villages. For one thing, he was the first explorer to witness preparation of the curare plant, which was used for poison arrows. He recognized the importance of the cinchona tree, who's bark contains quinine, a malaria killer. He also discovered the ocean current which eliminates rainfall on the coast of Peru. To record air pressure, he climbed to the top of one of the tallest volcanoes, Mount Chimborazo. His total journey consisted of about 2400 miles, which is reality is equal to the circumference of the Earth.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 10, 2015 8:42 PM

This video was quite interesting because I had never heard of Alexander von Humboldt, yet this great scientist founded many different important facts that are beneficial and helped to find with the preparation of the Curare Plant which is in poisonous arrows and discovered the ocean current on South America. Without Humboldt South America might have been at a lose for some objects and geographical information. Everyone has an impact in geography and geology, yet Humboldt helped to create contour maps which happened different patterns, everyone builds off of others ideas. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 3:58 PM

Nope, never heard of him.  Humboldt did some extraordinary things though.  I'm surprised we don't hear more about him in education.  I've definitely heard of Darwin though.  It's interesting what we decide is relevant or who is relevant in history.  

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Swipe the photos and see Hurricane Katrina disaster dissolve into present-day recovery

Swipe the photos and see Hurricane Katrina disaster dissolve into present-day recovery | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
Drag your cursor (on a computer) or swipe your finger (on a phone or tablet) across each photo below. The 2005 Hurricane Katrina photo will dissolve into a picture from the identical vantage point nine years later. CANAL STREET...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 26, 2014 10:16 AM

This is a well-curated gallery of before and after images. 

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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APHG-Unit 1

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:24 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 27, 2014 12:37 PM

Unit 1

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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APHG-Unit 1

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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Generational Divide on Israel and Palestine

Generational Divide on Israel and Palestine | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
Young Americans are showing far less fervent support for Israel than older generations.

 

Many older Americans can still recall the Six-Day War in 1967 or the Yom Kippur War in 1973, during which Israel’s very existence seemed to be threatened by its Arab neighbors. 

 By contrast, “young Americans have grown up with Israel as an incredible superpower in the region, and with occupation and intifada,” said Ira Stup of J Street, the liberal-leaning pro-Israel lobby group. “Young Americans often have a vision of Israel vis-a-vis Palestine that is more in line with what is going on now.”

There is no mistaking the depth of the generational split. 

Late last month, Gallup asked Americans whether Israel’s recent actions against Hamas were justified or unjustified. Those who were 65 or older backed Israel by a wide margin: 55 percent to 31 percent. But those aged between 18 and 29, said by more than a two-to-one margin — 51 percent to 25 percent — that Israel’s actions were unjustified.


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APHG-Unit 3

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Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail."


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Cory Erlandson's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:51 AM

Human-Environment Interaction in GIFs.

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 26, 2014 6:42 PM

This is a great demonstration of human impacts on ecosystems. 7 locations in the world show dramatic change over time.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

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There has never been a country that should have been so rich but ended up this poor

There has never been a country that should have been so rich but ended up this poor | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"Venezuela has become a failed state.  According to the International Monetary Fund's latest projections, it has the world's worst economic growth, worst inflation and ninth-worst unemployment rate right now. It also has the second-worst murder rate, and an infant mortality rate that's gotten 100 times worse itself the past four years. And in case all that wasn't bad enough, its currency, going by black market rates, has lost 99 percent of its value since the start of 2012. It's what you call a complete social and economic collapse. And it has happened despite the fact that Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves. Never has a country that should have been so rich been so poor.  There's no mystery here. Venezuela's government is to blame--which is to say that Venezuela is a man-made disaster. It's a gangster state that doesn't know how to do anything other than sell drugs and steal money for itself."

 

Tags: Venezuela, South America, op-ed, economic, political, governance.

 

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Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 2, 4:08 PM
Venezuela has the most promise to be an economic powerhouse. Their plethora of fossil fuel resources should make them such. However, their gross abuse of power and economic mismanagement have doomed the country to devastating economic hardships. Despite the clear fact that Venezuela should be a global fossil fuel player, the blatant and indredibly brash corruption and governmental incompetence was too much for their economic potential to withstand. 
David Stiger's curator insight, September 23, 3:54 PM
The line "there has never been a country that should have been so rich but ended up this poor" is jarring. Venezuela has the world's largest oil supplies - a natural resource so valuable some refer to it as "black gold." But, the nation has oddly become, as the article judged, a "failed state." The nation is suffering from staggering unemployment, poverty, and economic decline. People are starving and cannot meet their basic needs. The country tried tackling poverty under a socialist system by sharing the oil wealth with its citizens. This socialist project collapsed into failure with the onset of increased government corruption. 

Hugo Chavez, the country's former president, set in motion a government that was doomed to fail. Seeking to find supporters who were loyal to him, Chavez removed the economic and oil experts from power. Oil production fell drastically while government officials began engaging in drug dealing and embezzlement of public funds. The three pronged cancer has crippled an economy based on only one export - oil. If the economy had been diversified from the start, perhaps the crisis would not be so terrible. 

To alleviate hyper-inflation, President Nicolas Maduro has been subsidizing certain businesses. These businesses have found that selling their capital on the black market is more profitable than restocking their shelves to sell needed products at discounted rates. The governments efforts only cause the nightmare to grow. 

As people decry the deplorable acts of crony capitalism in the U.S., it would be wise to examine how sour a purely socialist system can turn. More equitable distribution of a country's wealth can be wise only if there are safeguards against corruption. Venezuela is a key example of what happens when a elite few loot and pillage an entire nation. 
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How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out!

How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out! | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
Think you're a geography expert? Test your knowledge with BBC Travel’s Geoguessr – the game that proves how well you know the world!

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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KEpps's curator insight, March 19, 2016 5:06 AM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 20, 2016 2:45 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 29, 2016 5:37 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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How Things Spread

How Things Spread | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.

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MsPerry's insight:

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:26 PM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

Jelel Ezzine's curator insight, March 25, 2016 3:13 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 2016 7:40 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Welcome to the land that no country wants

Welcome to the land that no country wants | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
Bir Tawil is the last truly unclaimed land on earth: a tiny sliver of Africa ruled by no state, inhabited by no permanent residents and governed by no laws.

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, March 23, 2016 5:44 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:28 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

Tracy Ross's curator insight, March 23, 2016 10:50 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

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Similarities Between Spanish And Arabic

Spanish and Arabic have more in common than you think, and it's not a coincidence.

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 26, 2016 4:07 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:29 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 2016 10:55 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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Here Are The Self-Declared Nations You Won't See At The UN

Here Are The Self-Declared Nations You Won't See At The UN | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
These nations might not have representation, but they play a major role in international affairs.

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

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Ben Salve's curator insight, March 28, 2016 7:40 PM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

Dee Dee Deeken's curator insight, March 28, 2016 11:26 PM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

degrowth economy and ecology's curator insight, March 31, 2016 9:41 AM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

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Map of Most Common Race

Map of Most Common Race | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, census, ethnicity, race.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:47 PM

Summary: This map shows racial distribution throughout Baltimore.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 7 because it shows how a city has been planned and built over time around racial discrimination with areas of similar race clumped together.

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:17 AM

This census map shows the diversity of America, but also largely shows how entire counties, such as those around Baltimore and St. Louis can be seemingly segregated between races, though all persons are American. This leads to bizarre nationalism and continued ethnic and racial divides in society through the uneven distribution of race and ethnicity in the US.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:00 AM

I think it is interesting to think about the reasons where certain ethnic groups live. It is sad but also interesting to see that because of the slavery in the south, black americans make a large if not  dominant percentage of the majority  of the south. It is also interesting to see where Asian Americans living where they do because it is a newer migration pattern. This is reflected in the areas that Asians settle because of how they got to their homes.

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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."


Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

APHG-U1 Place

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 2:13 PM

The squatters have made their own community complete with services and mini marts.  This tells me there is not enough affordable housing if the people of Caracas are willing to live in dangerous conditions.  Caracas government needs to build affordable housing or create better paying jobs so the citizens can spend the money in the community.  Its a cycle that needs everyone's participation to work to build a sustaining economy.  

Gene Gagne's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:42 PM

I found this article interesting

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 10:57 AM

we have talked about this in class. These people have learned to adapt and find ways to use electricity, running water. We have seen videos of other cities in countries with electrical cables and sewage water out in the open and people find ways to tap into it. The building reminds me of the abandon mills in R.I. where homeless people frequent to beat the harsh elements and sleep at night. They build small fires and use different areas for bathroom visits. The difference is our brick unoccupied mills find a way to catch fire and the city levels them to the ground. This is definitely unsafe but goes to show when you have no place to live its amazing how people find ways to survive and kind of build their own community. What I found disturbing is the people outside the neighborhood angry because the squatters took over the building. All of a sudden they complained about the safety of the squatters when in all reality they are safer because they are acting as a self community and know they need each other to survive. If the government or city officials or citizens of the neighborhood are that concerned then they can find a way to fix up the building.

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Ignorance of Africa’s geography deters tourists fearing Ebola

Ignorance of Africa’s geography deters tourists fearing Ebola | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
JOHANNESBURG — When Canadian tourist Shauna Magill posted on Facebook that she’d arrived safely in Uganda, a friend warned her to beware of “a thing called Ebola please.”

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

APHG-U1

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2014 4:11 PM

It shouldn't be too surprising that misconceptions about African geography has led to travelers are increasingly canceling trips to Africa, regardless of where on the continent it may be.  Here are some accurate maps and data to help inform our decisions.

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Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it

"It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail."


Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

APHG-Unit 1

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:15 AM

unit 1

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:51 AM

Human-Environment Interaction in GIFs.

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 26, 2014 6:42 PM

This is a great demonstration of human impacts on ecosystems. 7 locations in the world show dramatic change over time.

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Beautiful Landscapes

"Here's a collection of timelapses I shot during the past year. Amazing landscapes from California, Arizona, Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Taiwan to Italy."


Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

APHG-Unit 1

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:04 AM

Part of a teaching geography is showing the wonders of the Earth in as way that will hopefully spark some awe, curiosity, and desire to see more of the planet.  I think this video is a nice primer for that.  


Tags: landscape, time lapsevideo.

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The Craziest McDonald's Locations Around the Globe

The Craziest McDonald's Locations Around the Globe | APHG-Ch. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 | Scoop.it
In its quest for global fast-food domination, McDonald’s has opened more than 34,000 restaurants in 119 countries. And some reside in some pretty unexpected places. Here are 14 of the zaniest.

Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

APHG-Unit 1

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