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Maps Reveal How Immigration Transformed Boston's Neighborhoods

Maps Reveal How Immigration Transformed Boston's Neighborhoods | APHG | Scoop.it

"In 1910, Boston was the fifth biggest city in the United States, with a population just over 670,000. It was the second busiest port of entry for foreigners at the time, and 240,000 of its citizens were foreign born. A new exhibit at the Boston Public Library uses maps, modern and historic photos, and census data to illustrate how waves of immigration shaped the city and its individual neighborhoods in the 20th century — and continue to shape them today."


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Can you identify these famous buildings?

Can you identify these famous buildings? | APHG | Scoop.it
Test your knowledge of famous structures — from skyscrapers to ancient temples.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:38 AM

overall course knowledge

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Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail

Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail | APHG | Scoop.it
The Department of Commerce just lifted a ban on satellite images that showed features smaller than 20 inches. The nation's largest satellite imaging firm, Digital Globe, asked the government to lift the restrictions and can now sell images showing details as small as a foot. A few inches may seem slight, but this is actually a big deal.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, July 19, 2014 1:18 PM

Here we go.  I was just at the ESRI conference in San Diego and Digital Globe is pushing this in a big way.

 

We seem to be concerned about "drones," but there are a host of technologies that should be equally concerning.  The cats of which are mostly already out of the bags.

 

Merry Christmas!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:58 PM

APHG-U1

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:03 PM

Unit 1

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What is a part of the United States?


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’ | APHG | Scoop.it
YouTube users across the United States have uploaded dozens of videos to demonstrate their local dialects. PostTV examined people’s accents and state-specific answers to an online list of common questions.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:42 AM

unit 3, this is one of my favorite topics in class!

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Visualizing a Day in the Life of a New York City Cab

Visualizing a Day in the Life of a New York City Cab | APHG | Scoop.it
This week, Chris Whong, a self-professed “urbanist, mapmaker, data junkie” in Brooklyn, put out one of the more thrilling data projects we’ve seen recently. It was a visualization of the day in the...

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Why Israel is at war in Gaza, explained in less than 3 minutes

Why Israel is at war in Gaza, explained in less than 3 minutes | APHG | Scoop.it
A short explanation of how the worst round of Israeli-Palestinian fighting in five years began.

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | APHG | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | APHG | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis.