APES: Water Ownership
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My Scoop On Water Ownership

     The ownership of water is a complex topic.  Having a right to use water is not the same as owning it.  Governements try to set standards for water distribution but it is hard to control how much precipitation the weather will bring.  Water levels change from season to season depending on droughts and other climate changes.  This can greatly affect the way these different amounts of water are spread out and divided.

     Issues of water rights have created many conflicts in the world.  These conflicts occur most often in water-poor areas such as the Middle East.  It is predicted that as the population in these areas continue to increase the conflicts will grow.  Some examples where water ownership became a problem are during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war as well as the 1980 Iran-Iraq war. 

     The biggest probelm is determining who actually has a right to own the water.  Water is essential to human life therefor all humans should be entitled to all water on the Earth.  Some people believe it is best to globally manage water.  It is hard to limit water usage when it covers 97% of the Earth.  The mystery of water ownership may never be solved.

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Rainwater Ownership

Rainwater Ownership | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

Rain falling on your house and property should not be something to worry about, however you could be accused of the collection of rainwater and in some states you could be arrested.

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Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators

Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators..."

     Most people would think they should have access to any water on their property.  Most people would not even consider this as an issue.  In Jackson County, Oregon it is not quite so simple.  According to the law, any attempt to redirect or collect rainwater falling on your property is illegal.  In order to create a pond on your property you must receive a permit from the government.  One Oregon resident owning 170 acres of land received a permit to have ponds on his property.  This permit was then revoked soon after his ponds were already in place.  It was considered to be the collection of rainwater when rain would fall in his ponds and he was therefor breaking the law.  This man was given 30 days in jail as well as a $1500 fine.  This is just one example of how complicated the ownership of water can be.

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Water ownership

Water ownership | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

"The access and use of water is determined by the ownership of water. Since water is a scarce commodity, the competition for water can be very rigorous and it can be both economically and socially motivated"

     Since water is a limited resource there is often conflict when determining the actual ownership of the water.  The action of taking ownership over water is referred to as water privatization.  Privatization can occur in three different ways.  The first is the total selling of water to large corporations that will control the use of the water.  This is not the most common form of privatization.  Next is a process of the government allowing corporations to virtually pay rent on water and can then take over the role of transporting and selling the water.  The final process of privatization allows corporations to be contracted to control the water for an administrative fee.  In this final option the corporations are not allowed to receive revenue.  All three of these options are reasonable ways to privatize water, however the most common is the second, public-private partnerships.

 

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Collecting Water

Collecting Water | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

Clean water can be scare in many parts of the world, as shown in the picture above. A country's national ownership of water can affect how it's citizens obtain clean drinking water, compared to the global sharing of water rights.

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Diagram of Water Ownership

Diagram of Water Ownership | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

This graph is showing how the ownership of water is divided up and how much of the legal status each company has a right to.

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Pros and Cons of Water Ownership

Pros and Cons of Water Ownership | APES: Water Ownership | Scoop.it

 "When the World's ecosystems are globally interdependent and water, being the most fundamental resource to life, is essential to this global interdependence."

     The world's water needs are not being satisfied. There are both advantages and disadvantages of ownership of any kind of water. "Water wars" between countries competing for scarce water resources has become a serious international concern. A nation state frequently will protect only its own citizens' right to water, and possibly at a cost to non-citizens. National ownership of water is contrary to the global ecological context of water resources and therefore a global sharing of the water would be better.

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