APES: Aquifers in the United States
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APES: Aquifers in the United States
underground layers of water; groundwater
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Aquifers in the United States

Aquifers in the United States | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

This image shows every underground aquifer in the United Sates. Some of the United States most famous aquifers include the Ogalla aquifer in the middle of the United States and the Floridian aquifer around Florida.

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Ogalla Aquifer Picture

Ogalla Aquifer Picture | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

This picture displays the Ogalla Aquifer, the largest underground water source in the United States, it also shows the depth of the water at certain points during 1997 which will still be the deepest points today, although they may not be the same depth. 

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Floridan aquifer

Floridan aquifer | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

The Floridian aquifer is the most productive aquifer in the world. This aquifer supplies large amounts of water to many neighboring large cities in Florida and Georgia. A thick layer of carbonate rocks cover the Floridian aquifer. The permiability varies based the the part of the big system. The Upper Floridian is highly permeable in most places with a middle confining unit where it restricts water from the Upper and Lower Floridian.

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Aquifer Diagram

Aquifer Diagram | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

This diagram explains how aquifers can be confined by a impermeable rock layer or unconfined where water flows freely through the rock layers. Aquifers like this one are located all over the United States.

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EPA says fracking likely polluted Wyoming aquifer - AlertNet

EPA says fracking likely polluted Wyoming aquifer - AlertNet | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

In December of 2011, the EPA announced that the aquifer around Wyoming was contaminated in the search for natural gas. This was the first case of pollution of a water source through the search of natural gas since 1987. The EPA suggests the the mining company used to technique call fracking. Fracking, which is short for hydraulic fracturing, is the method of blasting large amounts of water, chemicals, and sand deep underground to break up the rocks containing natural gas. Normally fracking is done so deep underground that if has no worry about contaminating an aquifer, but the natural gas they mined was closer to the surface and was able to contaminate the aquifer. While the EPA wants to put a stop to the fracking their influence is limited due to a 2005 law that exempts fracking from the federal oversight. 


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My Scoop on Aquifers in the U.S

Aquifers are sources of usable groundwater. This groundwater exists in the multitude of small spaces found within permeable layers of rock and sediment. There are two basic types of aquifers, confined and unconfined. A confined aquifer means that water is surrounded by a layer of impermeable rock. An unconfined aquifer means that water can easily flow in and out of the aquifer.

How humans can use the water in these aquifers is through wells. The wells are drilled into the ground so they can use it to drink, take showers etc. Water flows in the aquifers like it does in the atmosphere, from high pressure to low pressure. This means that if a contaminant were to sink into an aquifer it could be easily spread. This also means that an unconfined aquifer is more likely to be contaminated with chemicals because water cannot penetrate through the impermeable layer of the confined aquifer.

Water in these aquifers cannot be there forever. Rainwater can percolate through the ground and into the aquifer. This is known as the recharge area. So the water that is building up needs a place to go. The area that dumps excess water from the aquifer is known as the discharge area. Water in an unconfined area may be there for days or years where as water in a confined aquifer recharges very slowly. This process could take up to thousands of years.

There can be many problems with humans using wells to take water out of aquifers. If humans take more water out then is being recharged, the aquifer could run out of water. For instance, the Ogallala aquifer in the Great Plains is a major supply or water that people use. Humans are taking water out to use it for houses, agricultural and industrial uses. If water is not being put back into the aquifer then it could run out. Hopefully there is not a time where we could run out of water but the way humans take advantage of it now who knows if we will have enough in the future.

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Texas Water District acts to slow depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer

Texas Water District acts to slow depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer | APES: Aquifers in the United States | Scoop.it

The Ogalla Aquifer's water supply is rapidly depleting. The people who live in North Texas are trying to stop the rapid depletion of the nations largest and most used underground water source. The High Plains Underground Conservation District has encacted a law in North Texas declaring that farmers are only allowed use enough water that allows an "allowable production rate." Through new irrigation techniques and a reduced use of water from the Ogalla, Texans plan to meet their 50/50 goal. Which leaves 50% of the Ogalla watersource left after 50 years.


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