AP World History
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A History Of Sudan's Civil Wars & Conflict

This is the story of how Sudan became two nations, and of an ongoing conflict in the Nuba Mountains that has changed the lives of millions of people. In parts 2–5 of our VR series, We Who Remain, follow the lives of four people living through the war: http://ajplus.co/nuba360. Produced in partnership with Nuba Reports and Emblematic Group.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:58 PM
Global Challenges: political geography
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The first video in this 5-part video is a bit slow, but provides the historical and geographic context needed to understand the developmental, ethnic, and political issues that remain so difficult to resolve.  The Subsequent four videos provide a more human, personal glimpse into facets of the conflict. 

 

Tags: Sudan, politicalethnicity, Africa, war.

Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 11:47 PM
From this video one can see how crucial borders can be to neighboring ethnic groups, especially in Sudan. North Sudan is made up of mostly Arabs and Muslims, while mainly Christians live in South Sudan. Also, the majority of North Sudan is black while the majority of South Sudan is white. Due to these two ethnic groups being so different and previously being grouped into one country, much fighting and a devastating civil war has broken out over the past few decades. Recently within the last decade Sudan was officially divided up into two nations because of the ongoing fighting and cultural differences which seems to be a step in the right direction to reduce the amount of fighting between the two countries.
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32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World

32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World | AP World History | Scoop.it
Our world is a complex network of people, places and things. Here are 32 maps will teach you something new about our interconnected planet.

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StacyOstrom's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

macellomedeiros's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Lynne Stone's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:08 PM
Everything posted by Seth Dixon really contributes to our understanding to the world.
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The Cold War: A pop-culture timeline

The Cold War: A pop-culture timeline | AP World History | Scoop.it
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed
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Half a century of U.S. interventions in Latin America, in one map

Half a century of U.S. interventions in Latin America, in one map | AP World History | Scoop.it

The map above summarizes the recent history of U.S. policy toward Latin America, a history with which few people in this country are familiar. It was produced for the activist newsletter ¡Presente! in 2011.


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A history of the New Zealand rugby haka

A history of the New Zealand rugby haka | AP World History | Scoop.it
Everyone in rugby seems to savour the haka
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40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire | AP World History | Scoop.it
2000 years ago today, the Roman Emperor Augustus died. His reign marked the start of a 200-year period of peace and prosperity for the empire.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2014 3:25 PM

While some internet map compilations aren't that informative, Vox puts together some quality sources in a way that add perspective and insight to any given topic.  This collection on the Roman Empire gives today's students maps with perspective to see the size of the Roman Empire as well as maps to show the cultural and historic context. 

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The Amritsar Massacre

The Amritsar Massacre | AP World History | Scoop.it
Early in April 1919 news of the arrest of Indian nationalist leaders in the Sikh holy city of Amritsar sparked riots in which a mob went on the rampage, killing several Europeans, leaving an English female missionary for dead, and looting numerous banks and public buildings. British and Indian troops under the command of Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer were sent to restore order and Dyer banned all public meetings which, he announced, would be dispersed by force if necessary.

Despite this, thousands gathered in protest in a walled enclosure called the Jallianwala Bagh, near the city’s Golden Temple, sacred to Sikhs. Dyer marched a force of 90 Gurkha and Indian soldiers into the enclosure and, without warning, they opened fire for about 10 to 15 minutes on the panicking crowd trapped in the enclosure. According to an official figure, 379 were killed and some 1,200 wounded, though other estimates suggest much higher casualties.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 2015 8:37 AM

April 13, 1919.  This was a pivotal moment that propelled the independence movement in India, and help Gandhi get more popular support. 

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:43 PM

Use if cover India

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The Holy Test

The Holy Test | AP World History | Scoop.it
Do you think you can tell the difference between the Bible and the Quran? Take this simple test to find out.
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China to end one-child policy - BBC News

China to end one-child policy - BBC News | AP World History | Scoop.it

China decides to end its decades-long policy of allowing couples to have only one child, Xinhua news agency reports.


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New Zealand’s haka is the world’s most perfect act of nationalism

New Zealand’s haka is the world’s most perfect act of nationalism | AP World History | Scoop.it
The ancient Maori war dance is now performed by the country's famous rugby team.

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Why India is still fighting over caste system - CNN.com

Why India is still fighting over caste system - CNN.com | AP World History | Scoop.it
Caste discrimination was supposedly a thing of the past, CNN's Ravi Agrawal says, but recent protests show that the practice still influences life in India.

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Mrs. Osborn's AP World History (APWH, WHAP) Course Introduction, 2015-2016

Mrs. Osborn's 2015-2016 AP World History (APWH, WHAP) Course Introduction. Rowlett High School. teacheroz.com.
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The Magna Carta and the troubled journey to an independent judiciary

The Magna Carta and the troubled journey to an independent judiciary | AP World History | Scoop.it
In popular perception the Middle Ages was a time of lawlessness and cruelty. And to a degree, that characterisation holds true. Crusades abroad, ill-disciplined governance at home, England in the early thirteenth century was not exactly enlightened.

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How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel

How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel | AP World History | Scoop.it
THE SIX-DAY WAR increased Israel’s territory threefold. The “borders of Auschwitz” were gone; the vulnerable nine-mile narrow waist acquired a thick cuirass with the mountains of the West Bank. Israel soon annexed East Jerusalem with some surrounding land; it did the same with the Golan Heights in 1981.

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East.


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 4, 2017 2:22 AM
How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:12 PM

Middle East/Southwest Asia

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 27, 11:53 AM
Anyone who thinks they have a solution to dividing up Israel into a land for both Palestinians and Israelis should read this article, because it is basically impossible.  It seems that both Palestinians and Israelis tried to claim as much land as they could for their own during the second half of the twentieth century.  However, they didn’t seem to have a long term plan because basically none of the territories are autonomously Palestinian or Israeli.  There would be no way to divide the country without displacing millions of people.  Jerusalem itself is even more of a mess because it is divided between Jews, Muslims, Christians and Armenians.  There would be no way to grant full control of Jerusalem to one group without causing major conflict.  The very last part of this article describes what both Israelis and Palestinians believe qualify them for greater power in the territory.  Both believe that whoever has a higher population should be entitled to more control.  The problem is that Palestians calculate that their population is about to be equal to the Israelis, but the Israelis believe the birth rate of the Orthodox Jews is high enough to keep their population larger.  It’s pretty hard to tell which group is correct because they are both very biased on the matter.  The settlement patterns and the stubbornness of both the Israelis and the Palestinians leave little hope that this conflict will be solved anytime soon.
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The world’s most powerful corporation

The world’s most powerful corporation | AP World History | Scoop.it
The East India Company was vast and powerful, hiring thousands across the world. But what was it like to work there? And are there parallels with today’s multinationals?
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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.
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Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey

"The curriculum 'Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey' traces the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the birth of the Turkish Republic, and contemporary issues in Turkey. Learn more at www.choices.edu/turkey "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:49 PM

This video is a great introduction to the Choices Program's new unit on Turkey...a country that is truly a bridge between the Middle East and Europe, without being fully in either.   This unique global position makes Turkey a very important country to understand both culturally and politically.


Tags: politicalculture, Turkeyhistorical.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:24 PM

Turkey has always been a country that I find interesting. So many amazing architectural structures and landscapes. I have two friends from high school who work there in the peace corps. I asked them what it's like and they couldn't really describe it. They said it isn't really Arabic but it certainly isn't western either. This was a good introductory video on the area.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 30, 11:23 AM
This video is helpful in understanding the factors that have made Turkey what it is today.  Their physical location has impacted much of their history, as they have been centrally located around various empires for centuries.  Turkey is complex because it doesn’t fit the mold of being a solely Middle Eastern country or a solely European country, it has elements of both regions.  Up until World War I, Turkey leaned more towards being an Islamic, more traditionally Middle Eastern country.  However at this point they adapted many European ways in order to retain their power as an empire.  Another point about Turkey is that the area that they are confined to now has only been so for about a century.  However, the Turks as a group of people have a very long and rich history.  Turkey is one of those countries that is difficult to fully understand or categorize because it is a multitude of cultures.  This is presenting a problem currently in Turkey as their government is being challenged.  It is yet to be seen whether the Turkish people want a more democratic style of government like that of European countries or a more authoritarian government like their Middle Eastern neighbors.  Since they are a combination of both areas culturally, it is hard to tell which system they will pick.
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Why don't black and white Americans live together? - BBC News

Why don't black and white Americans live together? - BBC News | AP World History | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.
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World War One Through Arab Eyes

World War One Through Arab Eyes | AP World History | Scoop.it
One hundred years after the Ottomans joined the war, this three-part series tells the story from an Arab perspective.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:10 PM

This was programmed on Al Jazeera

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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | AP World History | Scoop.it
This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.

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Armando's curator insight, June 28, 2015 6:59 AM

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:40 PM

Use for Global History warm up.

Dale Gray's curator insight, May 30, 9:21 AM
This is very specific teacher resource that could be useful when developing an unit plan for 'Movement of peoples (1750 – 1901)' ACDSEH018, particularly the area of study including:

Experiences of slaves, convicts and free settlers upon departure, their journey abroad, and their reactions on arrival, including the Australian experience (ACDSEH083)

The short and long-term impacts of the movement of peoples during this period (ACDSEH085)

Paired with inquiry-based questions this digital teacher resource will be a successful activity to engage learners.
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A history of the New Zealand rugby haka

A history of the New Zealand rugby haka | AP World History | Scoop.it
Everyone in rugby seems to savour the haka
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Russia and the Curse of Geography

Russia and the Curse of Geography | AP World History | Scoop.it

Want to understand why Putin does what he does? Look at a map.


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The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region

The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region | AP World History | Scoop.it
In the latest crisis, tens of thousands are racing to Hungary before a border fence is finished.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:34 AM

refugee

asli telli's curator insight, September 17, 2015 1:25 AM

#refugees #syria #middleeast #regions

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 26, 2017 1:36 PM
unit 2
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Download Free Cracking the AP World History Exam, 2016 Edition (College Test Preparation) EBOOK

Click Link : http://book99download.com/readbook.php?asin=0804126283.html PDF Download Free Cracking the AP World History Exam, 2016 Edition (College ...
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Putin: 'Kiev is the mother of all Russian cities' and 'We won't be able to live without each other'

Putin: 'Kiev is the mother of all Russian cities' and 'We won't be able to live without each other' | AP World History | Scoop.it
Ukraine's turmoil has become Europe's most severe security crisis in years and tensions have been high since Russian troops seized control of Crimea, which has now decided to merge with Russia. Russian troops are also massed near the border with Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine.
The new government in Kiev, Ukraine, was established after pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych fled to Russia in February 2014 after three months of protests culminated in deadly clashes. - AP
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