AP World History and AP Human Geography
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Organizing APHG content

Organizing APHG content | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Digital resources to strengthen the quality and quantity of geography education in classrooms the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2015 11:54 PM

Since this site is updated daily and organized chronically, finding some of the best posts from the past can be difficult for someone new to the site.  Some of the posts are on current events and not as relevant several years after the fact, but I want to make it easier to find the older posts that are still relevant today more easily accessible.  I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.  Additionally, this Story Map will also guide you on how to get more out of this website.         

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)
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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:33 PM

I think building a country from scratch mostly needs a plan for strong governance. Some of the items mentioned in the video would eventually be necessary (i.e. an anthem or a flag), but not exactly a top priority as the country could function without these. Rather the items like taxes and training the police are hugely important. A society needs the revenue to grow and the police to keep order. However, what disturbed me about this video is there were no other real mention of government institutions. Now I am not saying that the Constitution needs to be exactly like the United States, but the following is needed: a plan for how to treat the citizens, implement social programs, create/review the law, get officials into office, etc. Without looking at these basic questions of government, there is no way the country can function because there aren’t actually the procedures in place when problems do arise.

 

After strong governance, I also think that recognition in our globalized world is needed as well. In order for a country to prosper, the country will need to rely on other nations at one point in time for things like trading. If enough countries just refused to recognize the area and as such refused to trade then the country would more than likely fail. Luckily, Sudan is recognized by the United States and the UN did come to speak with the nation. SO that doesn’t seem to be an issue.

 

To me these are the top two things needed and since one is greatly missing, I am not surprised by the problems Sudan has.  

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Defining an Independent Nation

Defining an Independent Nation | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the terms country, state, and nation are often used interchangeably, there is a difference.

 

A straightforward explanation of important vocabulary terms for a political geography unit. 

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:54 PM

(Europe topic 6)

The contrast between these 3 terms (and combinations of them) has always been confusing to me, and I'd assume many others as well. Though this video explains fairly well the differences in definitions, I don't think that they have been consistently used as accurately as possible. Though terms like United Nations and the Navajo Nation seem to make sense to me, "one nation under God," as taken from the  Allegiance, might arguably be a technicality. Though the American spirit can be considered to have formed its own nation, there is undoubtedly a multitude of nations within (or at least partially in) the United States. (I'm not disagreeing with the phrase, but just thought it was worth mentioning during this time when the world has changed so much since its inception) Also, what is considered a nation by one group is not necessarily acknowledged by another, and this is what can lead to miscommunications, loss in translation, and arguably tensions, with the Middle East serving as a good example.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:04 PM

This short video does a great job of explaining the differences between these terms. Often they are wrongly used interchangeably while in reality they have distinct meanings and cannot simply be swapped out for another.

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Islamist group threatens Sochi Olympics

Islamist group threatens Sochi Olympics | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rebels from North Caucasus issue terror threat to organisers, singling out hosts and visitors for target.

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Foods that Changed the World

Foods that Changed the World | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The impact of crops involved in the Columbian Exchange


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Sacred Sites at Sacred Destinations - Explore sacred sites, religious sites, sacred places

Sacred Sites at Sacred Destinations - Explore sacred sites, religious sites, sacred places | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
An online catalogue of sacred sites - articles, maps and photos of hundreds of sacred sites, holy places, religious architecture and mysterious sites around the world.

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Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School's curator insight, January 14, 2013 3:23 PM

Waht a great site for dealing with the cultural landscape and especially the concept of sacred site

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Mercator projection with Africa at the top.... - Maps on the Web

Mercator projection with Africa at the top.... - Maps on the Web | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Mercator projection with Africa at the top.
ta9909:
“Very fun interactive here: http://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition/
(Click ‘pause’ though or you’ll start to get dizzy after a while.)
” (Mercator projection with Africa at the top.

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:51 PM

Such powerful imagery. I was tinkering around with the pictures and moving the scroller from right to left, keeping my eye on a particular house that stood before the typhoon. To keep scrolling to the left and to watch that image of the house completely disappear was absolutely surreal. It made the news of the devastation wrought by the storm seem so much more real; here I was, sitting in class and watching a home- a place where a family once lived, where lives had been and were continuing to be forged- completely disappear from the face of the map, never to return. I have lived in the same home for 15 years, and I could never imagine watching my home disappear in such a manner. The psychological impact of this devastation on such a massive scale is unimaginable, something that must be endured in order to truly understand- and, unfortunately for the people living in these areas, they now understand it all too well. The financial recovery from this storm will eventually come- perhaps not as fast as hoped, but it will, as always- but the recovery in human costs will take much longer. For those affected, many will believe that there can never be a recovery. Watching that home disappear in the blink of an eye makes me feel that they are probably right.

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The Islamic Legacy of Timbuktu

The Islamic Legacy of Timbuktu | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
No word in English connotes remoteness more than Timbuktu. Thanks to the astonishing wealth that Mansa Musa had displayed on his visits to Cairo and Makkah, it also connoted riches.

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Samarra – the Abbasid Capital in Iraq | Islamic Arts and Architecture

Samarra – the Abbasid Capital in Iraq | Islamic Arts and Architecture | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A blog post about the capital of the Abbasid in Iraq and the largest archaeological site in the world.

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The Islamic World: Religion, Philosophy, Politics and History

The Islamic World: Religion, Philosophy, Politics and History | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Albert Hourani, one the greatest scholars of the history of Middle East and whose students are now brilliant lecturers in the faculties of Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Turkish soap operas ignite culture war in Middle East revolution – Decoder | Video | Reuters.com

Turkish soap operas ignite culture war in Middle East revolution – Decoder | Video | Reuters.com | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This news report about popular television programs produced in Turkey and their influence throughout the Islamic Middle East was quite an eye-opener to me. Although, as an American, it doesn't come as a surprise that popular TV shows are having an effect on public opinion and cultural norms, I had not really been aware of how this effect was occurring in other parts of the world. Something to think about in terms of modern cultural change.

 


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 1, 2013 4:25 PM
Nice capture of what is happening in what is coming next in Arab Spring.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 1, 2013 8:35 PM

Agree it's an eye opener on what's happening now, post Arab Spring, including how these programs with their breaking of  cultural taboos and progressive views of women are making an impact.  Intrigued they are reaching a huge market share (bigger than the Superbowl) in the Middle East and the world.  ~ D

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Can you name the Countries of the World? | Online Games & Trivia by Sporcle

Play the Countries of the World Quiz on Sporcle, the best trivia and game site on the web!

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How Many Countries Are There?


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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Central African Republic: Religious tinderbox

Central African Republic: Religious tinderbox | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Concern is growing that the Central African Republic is sliding into religious conflict following the overthrow of President Francois Bozize in a rebellion in March.

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@NewDayStarts's curator insight, November 4, 2013 3:31 PM

Muslim-Christian attacks escalate Central African crisis

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1493: An Uncommon History of How Columbus Changed the World

1493: An Uncommon History of How Columbus Changed the World | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
What events from half a millennium ago can teach us about the globalization debate today.

In 2005, 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles C. Mann came to be regarded as the most ambitious and sweeping look at pre-Columbus North and South America ever published. This month, Mann is back with 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created — a fascinating look at one of the lesser-known, lesser-considered aspects of what happened when Columbus and his crew set foot on American soil: the environmental upheaval that began as they brought plants, animals and diseases that forever changed the local biosphere, both in America and in Europe once the explorers returned to the Old World. Known as The Columbian Exchange, this process is considered the most important ecological event since the extinction of the dinosaurs, and the paradoxes at its heart echo today’s polarized views of globalization as either a great cross-pollinator or a great contaminator of cultures.


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Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery

Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Last week Glenn Wiebe published a list of iPad apps for history teachers. One item in that list that was new to me was European Exploration: The Age of Discovery. This free iPad app puts students in charge of exploring the "New World." In the game students are in charge of selecting explorers and ships to send out to the New World. Students have to manage the finances of their expeditions so that they don't run out of money before they can return home safely."


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Harry Morley's curator insight, November 23, 2014 8:49 AM

Read this article then play the game and review the game

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 2016 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 6:44 PM
This emotional video only makes sense to those who have the political context, however, its story is one that is not uncommon in the region. The video depicts and old man and his granddaughter discussing his life before he and his family moved after the partition. It shows his granddaughter using google to send his a surprise for his birthday. 
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Egypt 'worst in Arab women's rights'

Egypt 'worst in Arab women's rights' | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Egypt is now the worst country for women's rights in the Arab world, according to a poll of experts on gender issues in 22 Arab states.


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Islamic Architecture

Islamic Architecture | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Islamic architecture is in part comprised of those buildings and built environments intended for use in Islamic worship, commemoration, and instruction. Among the architecture of this group are mosques, madrasas or schools, mausoleums, and shrines.

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Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 17, 2014 12:47 PM

Help us spread the message of Quran/Hadith around the world.
Online Quran,online Tajweed.In Shaa Allah
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ

Like/Share/Comment

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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

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The Amazing Abbasid Dynasty

This is great presentation outlining the basics of the Abbasid Empire. 

 


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The Islamic Legacy of Timbuktu

The Islamic Legacy of Timbuktu | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
No word in English connotes remoteness more than Timbuktu. Thanks to the astonishing wealth that Mansa Musa had displayed on his visits to Cairo and Makkah, it also connoted riches.

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"Upside down" map of the world, by Hema Maps Get... - Maps on the Web

"Upside down" map of the world, by Hema Maps Get... - Maps on the Web | AP World History and AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
'Upside down' map of the world, by Hema Maps
Get a puzzle with this map (affiliate) ('Upside down' map of the world, by Hema Maps Get a puzzle with...

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