AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School
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AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School
This is an aid for students in AP Micro and Macroeconomics.
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Student Loans Are Too Expensive To Forgive

Student Loans Are Too Expensive To Forgive | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Late last year, graduate students watched as legislators in the House debated giving them a hefty new tax bill: A version of the GOP tax plan proposed to treat …
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How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America

How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it

"Dollar General stores thrive in low-income rural towns, and the deep-discount chain has opened hundreds of new shops in the past year."

 

Dollar General is set to open 1,000 locations this year, for a total of more than 14,000 stores. It will have more stores than McDonald's has restaurants in the entire country. That includes plenty of urban locations, but the chain's bright yellow and black signs pop up about every 10 miles along many remote state highways. Like Walmart, it has rural roots. Dollar General started in small-town Kentucky. Al Cross, who runs the Institute for Rural Journalism at the University of Kentucky, says Dollar General competes with the world's largest retailer on price and convenience.

 

Tags: rural, retail, podcast.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 7:49 PM
I found this article to be very relevant since the first Dollar General store I've ever seen just popped up within the last year in Rhode Island. Apparently Dollar General is such a big chain in the rest of the country, that it has more stores than Walmart does. According to this article, there are certain advantages and disadvantages of Dollar General building stores in the rural parts of the country. For example this article talks about how people in some rural areas have towns that are so small they don't have any local grocers. So when a Dollar General is built in a town like that, it is a huge benefit to the town. In other cases with small towns that already have a local grocery store, Dollar General can put that store out of business with the difference in their prices. Ultimately, whether or not Dollar General's expansion into rural areas of the U.S. can be seen as negative or positive depends on the local business structure in those small towns.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM
Development
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Trump's ‘Smart’ Steel Tariffs Don't Make Economic Sense

Trump's ‘Smart’ Steel Tariffs Don't Make Economic Sense | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The president says they'll protect American jobs and bolster national security. They'll likely do neither.
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The U.S. Economy Added 2.1 Million Jobs in 2017

The U.S. Economy Added 2.1 Million Jobs in 2017 | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
But job growth in 2018 likely won't be as robust.
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Robots can pick strawberries. Now what?

Robots can pick strawberries. Now what? | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it

"The robots have arrived. And they’ll be picking crops in Florida fields soon. Robots can do things humans can’t. They can pick all through the night. They can measure weight better. They can pack boxes more efficiently. They don’t take sick days, they don’t have visa problems.

Google 'are robots taking our jobs?' and you get millions of theories: Robots will take over most jobs within 30 years; yes, but it’s a good thing; yes, but they will create jobs, too; chill out, they won’t take them all. Truckers, surgeons, accountants and journalists have all been theoretically replaced by prognosticators.

But harvesting specialty crops is different: Plants vary in shape and size and determining ripeness is complex — experts have said there are too many variables for robots. Until now."


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Jane Ellingson's insight:
Structural Changes in the economy.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2017 5:14 PM

Many industries have been, and will continue to be transformed by automation and robotics.  There is a great amount of uncertainty and anxiety in the labor pools as workers see many low skill jobs are being outsourced and other jobs are being automated.  Some economic organizations are preparing resources for workers to strengthen their skills for the era of automation. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will a machine like this transform the agricultural business? How might it impact migration, food prices, or food waste?

 

Tags: economic, laboragribusiness, industry, food production, agriculture.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:46 PM
Where will this lead us in terms of population, economics, and agriculture?
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From 'Dream Jobs' to Bussing Tables Again

From 'Dream Jobs' to Bussing Tables Again | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The end of DACA would mean the end of economic mobility for hundreds of thousands of people.
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Why do people and nations trade?

"Mark Blyth of Brown University explains international trade." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 2017 7:17 PM

To understand international trade, you need to understand how the factors of production vary from place to place, resulting in different locations having a comparative advantage on a global market.  This video nicely explains that with the example of Scotland’s comparative advantage raising sheep with southern Europe’s comparative advantage in producing wine.   Does the size of a country matter in trade?  You betcha.

 

Tags: regions, economic, diffusion, industry

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When Feelings About Money Have Nothing to Do With Actual Finances

When Feelings About Money Have Nothing to Do With Actual Finances | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Republicans say their money situation is looking up, and Democrats report a downturn. But the only thing that’s changed is the president.
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How did Zimbabwe get so poor?

President Mugabe's economic mismanagement of Zimbabwe has brought the country poverty and malnutrition. After 36 years in charge, he's looking to extend his rule by 5 more years.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 11:58 AM
unit 4 and unit 6 #democratization?
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 4:58 PM
This video investigates how the country of Zimbabwe managed to become impoverished. Under the reign of Robert Mugabe, the country’s agricultural sector was destroyed. In doing so, he caused the money run out, so he printed more which caused worst hyperinflation ever. This video shows how the countries that are run poorly can affect its inhabitants.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 10:02 AM
Robert Mugabe's blatant and stunning incompetence and corruption destroyed the value of the Zimbabwean dollar and the resulting hyperinflation decimated the national economy. This is one of the premier examples of how a total lack of competent and powerful institutions can undermine a once promising economy and devolve a nation into one of the poorest on earth. 
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How did Zimbabwe get so poor?

President Mugabe's economic mismanagement of Zimbabwe has brought the country poverty and malnutrition. After 36 years in charge, he's looking to extend his rule by 5 more years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 11:58 AM
unit 4 and unit 6 #democratization?
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 4:58 PM
This video investigates how the country of Zimbabwe managed to become impoverished. Under the reign of Robert Mugabe, the country’s agricultural sector was destroyed. In doing so, he caused the money run out, so he printed more which caused worst hyperinflation ever. This video shows how the countries that are run poorly can affect its inhabitants.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 10:02 AM
Robert Mugabe's blatant and stunning incompetence and corruption destroyed the value of the Zimbabwean dollar and the resulting hyperinflation decimated the national economy. This is one of the premier examples of how a total lack of competent and powerful institutions can undermine a once promising economy and devolve a nation into one of the poorest on earth. 
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New Taxes Send The Price Of Gas Soaring In Some States

New Taxes Send The Price Of Gas Soaring In Some States | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
With an emphasis on lowering federal taxes, consumers across the country are paying more in state and local taxes - including gas taxes. Drivers in seven states are paying more for gas in 2017.
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The Final Days Of Hawaiian Sugar

The Final Days Of Hawaiian Sugar | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The sugar industry in Hawaii dominated the state's economy for over a century. But it has shrunk in recent years. Now, the last of the state's sugar mills has wrapped up its final harvest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 19, 2016 9:50 PM

I grew up hearing commercials that sold the purity of the Hawaiian sugar Industry (C & H, Pure Sugar, that's the one!).  These commercials sold not just the purity of Hawaii's sugar, but also of the people and the place.  These commercials were some of my first geographic imaginings of an exotic tropical paradise on the peripheral edge of the United States.  Just like the imagined tropical bliss, the actual sugar industry of Hawaii is also coming to an end.  "For over a century, the sugar industry dominated Hawaii's economy. But that changed in recent decades as the industry struggled to keep up with the mechanization in mills on mainland U.S. That and rising labor costs have caused Hawaii's sugar mills to shut down, shrinking the industry to this one last mill."   

 

Tags: industrymanufacturinglabor, economic, agribusiness, agriculture.

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Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong

Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it

"While 75 percent of Germans who live in the east said that they considered their country's reunification a success, only half of western Germans agreed. With eastern and western Germans blaming each other for past mistakes over the past two years, that frustration has likely increased. Younger citizens, especially — who do not usually identify themselves with their area of origin as strongly anymore — have grown worried about the persistent skepticism on both sides. But where do those divisions come from? And how different are eastern and western Germany today?"


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 2016 11:25 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 9, 3:00 PM
The social, political, and economic impacts of reunification are still being flt today. The old policies of both East and West Germany still impact the cultural and social habits of Germans. Despite the borders between the two former nations being eliminated almost 30 years ago, the differences between the two halves of Germany will be felt for decades to come. Issues from vaccines to child care to trash production all feel the effects of the policies of the former division.
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 20, 11:48 AM
From when this article was written it has been 26 years since Germany was completely unified.  But over the last two years there has been a rift between east and west Germany.  Economically the east feels left behind by the west with their rise of wealth.  The west is mad that the east doesn’t taken in as many refugees as they do.  These rifts between the two are not making things easy to work out between the two.  All they are doing are pointing fingers and not coming up with solutions.  Many people of the younger generations don’t feel as divided as the older generations do.  They feel they are Germans and not east or west.  Maybe they can find a way to bring people together as one. 
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We Let Our Readers Practice International Trade. They Started A Bunch Of Trade Wars.

We Let Our Readers Practice International Trade. They Started A Bunch Of Trade Wars. | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Why couldn’t we all just get along? Last week, we published an article on the game theory of international trade and trade wars. The article included an interac…
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Is Big Business Really That Bad?

Is Big Business Really That Bad? | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Large corporations are vilified in a way that obscures the innovation they spur and the steady jobs they produce.
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America Finally Sees Meaningful Wage Growth

America Finally Sees Meaningful Wage Growth | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The first jobs report of the year beat economists’ expectations, and provided the biggest boost in earnings since 2009.
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The Places That May Never Recover From the Recession

The Places That May Never Recover From the Recession | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The Rust Belt isn’t the only region left behind by the economic recovery. The suburbs of the American west are struggling, too.
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The Long Game of Republican Economics

The Long Game of Republican Economics | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Corporate tax cuts are just the first step.
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The Fallacy of Endless Economic Growth

The Fallacy of Endless Economic Growth | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
What economists around the world get wrong about the future.

 

The idea that economic growth can continue forever on a finite planet is the unifying faith of industrial civilization. That it is nonsensical in the extreme, a deluded fantasy, doesn't appear to bother us. We hear the holy truth in the decrees of elected officials, in the laments of economists about flagging GDP, in the authoritative pages of opinion, in the whirligig of advertising, at the World Bank and on Wall Street, in the prospectuses of globe-spanning corporations and in the halls of the smallest small-town chambers of commerce. Growth is sacrosanct. Growth will bring jobs and income, which allow us entry into the state of grace known as affluence, which permits us to consume more, providing more jobs for more people producing more goods and services so that the all-mighty economy can continue to grow. "Growth is our idol, our golden calf," Herman Daly, an economist known for his anti-growth heresies, told me recently.

 

Tags: op-ed, economic, industry, sustainability, development, consumption, climate change, environment, resources.

 


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Venezuela Is Starving

Venezuela Is Starving | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Once Latin America’s richest country, Venezuela can no longer feed its people, hobbled by the nationalization of farms as well as price and currency controls. The resulting hunger and malnutrition are an unfolding tragedy.

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Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:27 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes. This is because food production is but a small part of a larger picture; the system of food production and distribution in Venezuela has been decimated by the nationalization of private farms. Individual farmers can’t make a profit in the new political economy and consequently are going to stop producing for the market. This vicious cycle is political in nature more so than in is agricultural.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 9, 10:46 PM
(South America) It's depressing to see the dramatic turn of events in Venezuela's political and economic climate in recent decades, coming from the richest country in Latin America to the country with the world's highest inflation rates and number two on country murder rating. This causes increased levels of crime, stealing and looting food for families to survive. The Venezuelan government has refused foreign aid and yet cannot find a solution to fixing the lack of food, healthcare, and medicine. This problem affects several South American countries and always poses a threat of travelling across borders. We tend to think of the Western World as more enlightened yet just south of the US we find authoritarian countries with the highest crime rates in the world, starving its own people.
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 15, 2:05 PM
Sometimes the world seems like a really hopeless place and this article definetly supports that train of thought.  Venezuela only a few years ago produced enough food to feed themselves and actually had enough surplus that they were able to export.  What they couldn’t grow they would import.  The food shortage that the country is facing is not an agriculture problem in the sense that the land is incapable of producing food or shipping routes have been compromised, but a problem with how the government started running the system.  As one farmer said, “‘The system is created so you can’t win.’”  The government took ownership of many large farms and fertilizer and feed production.  Those groups have barely been producing anything and causes the entire agricultural community to suffer and Venezuelans to starve.  Another problem that is making the situation in Venezuela even worse is that the economy collapsed and inflation is rampant.  The value of currency is so low that people cannot even afford the scarce food available.  There are few employment opportunities, making finances even more strained.  But perhaps the most upsetting part is that children are literally starving to death and there is nothing hospitals can do to stop these deaths because they themselves do not have the resources.  The combination of an economy in shambles and a botched agricultural system have left Venezuelans in turmoil with little government effort to help.  The government is not only not providing help, but they are literally refusing aid from foreign governments who have offered.  Geographically, Venezuela is located in an area with sufficient farm land and large reserves of oil, so they shouldn’t be struggling.  But people have the ability to ruin or ignore what nature has provided them and that is why Venezuelans are withering away.
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Is Economic Despair What's Killing Middle-Aged White Americans?

Is Economic Despair What's Killing Middle-Aged White Americans? | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Two Princeton economists elaborate on their work exploring rising mortality rates among certain demographics.
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Is It Better to Be Poor in Bangladesh or the Mississippi Delta?

Is It Better to Be Poor in Bangladesh or the Mississippi Delta? | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
The Nobel laureate Angus Deaton discusses extreme poverty, opioid addiction, Trump voters, robots, and rent-seeking.
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Providence area sees biggest shift away from manufacturing jobs in US

Providence area sees biggest shift away from manufacturing jobs in US | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it

A new study illustrates just how drastically employment has plunged in Rhode Island’s historic industrial base over recent decades. Since 1980, the Providence metropolitan area has experienced the largest shift in the country away from manufacturing jobs and into work requiring college degrees, according to a paper by Stephan Whitaker, a research economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. “In 1980, 40% of workers in the Providence metro area worked in manufacturing and 25% worked in degree-intensive fields,” Whitaker writes. “By 2014, manufacturing had dropped to just 11%, and degree-intensive jobs had risen to 47%.”

 

Tags: urban, industry, manufacturing, labor, economic, Rhode Island.


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America Is Still Making Things

America Is Still Making Things | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
Manufacturing is dead. Long live manufacturing.
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Minimum-Wage Increases: Another Big Winner on Election Night

Minimum-Wage Increases: Another Big Winner on Election Night | AP Micro and Macroeconomics at Mankato West High School | Scoop.it
At least 2 million Americans will get raises after ballot measures passed in a handful of states.
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