AP Human GeographyNRHS
865 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

geteach.com

geteach.com | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:54 PM

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is Remote Sensing?

CIRES Fellow and NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati and CIRES Fellow Steve Nerem explain Remote Sensing and how it is used to study our planet. 'Like' CIRES…

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:13 AM

These scientists explain some of the purposes and applications of remote sensing at a level that is accessible for just about any audience. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, K12.

dilaycock's curator insight, January 4, 2013 11:57 PM

Totally agree with Seth Dixon. This is a great video that explains remote sensing.

nzgeogeek's curator insight, February 4, 2013 12:21 AM

These scientists explain some of the purposes and applications of remote sensing at a level that is accessible for just about any audience.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

A Sense of Place

A Sense of Place | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
THERE WAS SOMETHING odd about the black car at the junction of Sutter and Hyde Streets. It was an ordinary saloon. Its windows were clear, and it looked in good...

 

Technologies today have allowed us to be digitally connected from anywhere.  This impacts geographic patterns from outsourcing to local businesses that rely on interpersonal communications to connect potential demand with resources.  Some may see this as geography becoming less of a barrier, and consequently, less relevant.  This article in the Economist argues that as these technologies have rendered location more important than ever since they rely on geospatial technologies.  "The reports of the death of distance have been much exaggerated." 

 

Tags: technology, globalization, location, place.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Geo-geek humor -- A cartoon strip on the projector in the 3 minutes before class can be a good thing.  I'm a Robinson. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 10, 2012 11:06 AM
I feel the Robinson map is a closest representation of the world that is translated onto a 2-D map. All of the land masses and oceans look to be accurate without flattening the map completely and still having a curvature to it; which is more of a representation of the globe.
Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:36 PM

This cartoon strip shows the different types of map projections, and has a caption of what your personality is like if you like the map projection.

I thought this was really funny, especially the caption for the Peters Projection. I'm a Robinson for sure, because I just like the way it looks. I think all the different types of maps are good and useful in their own way, even the Peters... I guess...

We also learned all the different types of map projections in class, which helped me recognize these maps. This is also a humorous way for people who don't know the different map projections to learn it while still having a fun and good time. Maps are an important element in APHUG, because everyone should know how to read maps. It's part of Unit 1, because it shows the landmasses, and some maps can show different perspectives on things.

This quirky and humorous map will help the students in next year's APHUG class the different map projections, while having fun and finding out their personality that goes along with the different maps.

1) key geographical skills

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:37 PM

This is a good overview of some different types of map projections and it has some humor too! I like how all the different types of map are all in one place. Also, each picture  is fairly detailed so that I can really see how one map is different from the next. I'm hoping this will be a good study tool in studying for the AP exam if there are any questions about different types of map projections.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Astrobleme

Astrobleme | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Lake Manicouagan lies in an astrobleme in central Quebec covering an area of approximately 1206 square miles—an area half the size of Delaware. An astrobleme is a scar left on the Earth’s surface from an impact of a meteorite. Lake Manicouagan is the result of one of the largest identified asteroid or comet impacts on Earth. In the middle of the lake, on Rene-Levasseur Island, Mount Babel rises 3,123 feet into the air.

 

Lake Manicouagan is thought to have formed about 212 million years ago plus or minus 4 million years.  This happened when an approximately 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid crashed into Earth toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists speculate that this impact may have been responsible for the mass extinction that wiped out more than half of all living species."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:33 PM

This amazing picture shows how vulnerable the earth is to space born hazards.  This 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid might have caused 1/2 the living species on the earth at that time, 212 million years or so ago, to become extinct.  Man has the abilty to adapt to changes to the environment, unlike the dinosaurs.  The question is though do we have the ability to adapt to an event of this magnitude?  Hopefully we will not have to test out this question.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Discover Ancient Rome in Google Earth

"See Rome as it looked in 320 AD and fly down to see famous buildings and monuments in 3D. Select the 'Ancient Rome 3D' layer under Gallery in Google Earth."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Giuseppe Corsaro's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:32 AM

Guardare l'antica Roma così come appariva nel 320 d.C. e volare giù per vedere edifici famosi in 3D. Seleziona 'Ancient Rome 3D'  nella Gallery di Google Earth.

Neville R Langit's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:56 PM

got to love google earth

Keith Mielke's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:10 PM

It's astounding how modern technology can really take us back to ancient times to see how others not only lived but prospered.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps

10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Google maps brings the world to your desktop - well, most of it, anyway. Here are 10 locations that governments and other entities have blurred or removed from satellite photos.

 

A user of geospatial technologies is not free to explore all places of the Earth with equal levels of specificity. Why?  Where?  How come?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:15 PM

although we like to think that we are able to go anywhere on the world wide web some locations are off limits. Google Earth allows us to see place we have never been. However, some place are not available for us to see due to security reasons. Google Earth has restricted the public to view certain images of locations.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:50 AM

The geographic context surrounding some locations is highly restricted.

What does this censorship tell you? 

It's not always political, some areas of resource extraction have been blurred too.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 19, 2014 1:29 PM

Pretty cool stuff...