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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

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Maldives

Maldives | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:54 PM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:39 PM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

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Wasted Food Around The World Takes Heavy Toll On Environment : NPR

Wasted Food Around The World Takes Heavy Toll On Environment : NPR | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Wasted food creates billions of tons of greenhouse gases, and it costs us precious water and land. The rice lost in Asia and the meat wasted in rich countries contribute most heavily to the problem.

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PatrickHance's comment, September 15, 2013 9:47 PM
We waste 1.43 billion tons of food globally each year. Besides from the obvious problem of wasted food feeding nobody, wasting food worsens the environmental impact of farming. A report by the Food and Agriculture Organization brings to light the issue of food waste, especially in land and water waste. Pairs of regions and foods were created for the study. 6 out of the 10 pairs were from Asian countries, who waste the most vegetables and grains. Latin America, Europe, and the US account for 80% of wasted meat. These two figures are the most concerning because rice and meat have the highest carbon impact levels. In developing countries, food waste is primarily caused by shipping issues, and in wealthier countries consumers are the primary cause for food waste. People in rich countries buy more food than they can eat, and also overreact to expiration dates and throw away food that is still good.
PatrickHance's comment, September 15, 2013 9:57 PM
Food waste is a very important global issue. Not only could food that you waste be used, it has a large impact on the environment. It's also very expensive; food waste costs farmers $750 billion a year, still excluding seafood. Food waste is becoming even more concerning with predicted decreases in food security. The FAO's study calculated that currently, we will need to increase food production by 60% to feed everyone by 2050. By reducing our food waste, there wouldn't be as much demand to increase production. Food production already takes a heavy toll on the environment, why would you want it to be even less efficient? You can reduce food waste by only buying what you need, and by of course eating all of your food.
PatrickHance's comment, September 15, 2013 9:58 PM
Barclay, Eliza. "Wasted Food Around The World Takes Heavy Toll On Environment." The Salt. NPR, 11 9 2013. Web. 15 Sep. 2013. <Wasted Food Around The World Takes Heavy Toll On Environment>.
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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”

 

As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 

 

Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Cities Threatened By Climate Change

Cities Threatened By Climate Change | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
It's not just flooding: Plenty of other issues—such as rising sea levels and drought—present pressing problems for these urban areas.

Climate change is one of the most serious issues facing the world's cities in the 21st century, but so far policymakers, planners, and scientists have come up with few solutions to prevent—or mitigate—its calamitous effects.

While flooding disasters like Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have brought attention to the dangers posed by stronger storms, there are plenty of other threats—such as rising sea levels—that might be even more pressing. Wildfires and drought have already heavily damaged the American Southwest, while flooding threatens low-lying island nations.

Visit the link to find which cities that will soon be in danger.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:56 AM

This article explains the effects of the climate change has on the city. This shows us that the climate controls the physical setting of a city and if any changes are made in the climate that means that the city will also change with it. In some cases this can dangerous and cause harm to a cities landmark or physical geography. Some issues that are concerning about this is flooding's, hurricane's, and other strong storms.

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Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:09 PM

Similar to the Aral Sea,  the Tigris and Euphrates river basins have become drier and drier between 2003 and 2009. It is important to see all the aspects that have caused the rive to dry out and its do to there own people in this region. About 60 percent of the loss was attributed to the pumping of groundwater from underground reservoirs. Most of the problems are due to that about one-fifth of the water losses came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought. These could be some of the environmental issues but also there has been tremendous population increases in this region. This water is perfect drinking water for the people of South East Asia and the countries surrounding it but numbers are extremely high. 

It is important to analyze how us humans can change the geography of a certain area in such little time. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

The middle east has lost a huge portion of its freshwater over the past decade. The two natural-color images above were acquired by the Landsat satellites and show the shrinking of the Qadisiyah Reservoir in Iraq between September 7, 2006 and September 15, 2009. The first graph shows the elevation of the water in that reservoir between January 2003 and December 2009. The second graph shows water storage from January 2003 to December 2009. Obtaining ground data information in the middle east can be difficult.The researchers calculated that about one-fifth of the water losses in their Tigris-Euphrates study region came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought.

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NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

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10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth

10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

It wasn’t too long ago that the term ‘Smart City’ was not on very many people’s radar screens, but recently, it has been more familiar, and people are understanding the concepts behind smart cities.


A smart city uses information combined with technology to improve quality of life, reduce environmental impact, and decrease energy demand. This list of the smartest cities on the planet takes those factors into consideration, as well as the ‘smart’ plans the city might have for the future...


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ComplexInsight's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:26 PM

Great find from Peter Jasperse's blog and an inspirational read for those interested in building a smarter cities and environments since these cities have already started along the journey.

Jed Fisher's comment, February 16, 2013 4:54 AM
fantastic!
Jed Fisher's comment, February 16, 2013 4:54 AM
fantastic!
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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:59 PM

This shows how different cultures have adapted to harsh environments 

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

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Where the world’s running out of water, in one map

Where the world’s running out of water, in one map | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
About 1.7 billion people depend on freshwater aquifers that are being depleted faster than they can be refilled by rain. That includes the crucial Ogallala Aquifer in the midwestern United States.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

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Terraced Rice Fields

Terraced Rice Fields | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
See a photo of an aerial view of a terraced rice field in China and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 2013 11:14 AM

This image shows is one of the more beautiful cultural landscapes that shows the great extent of agricultural  modifications of the environment.  National Geographic's photo of the day is a great source for images that start class discussions and can enliven class content. You may download a high resolution version of the image here

 

Tags: National Geographic, agriculture, landscape, China.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:42 PM

Rice fields are pretty neat. You need to be one meticulous person to be able to build these fields. The shapes of them and the erosion that occurs to the oldest ones form interesting patterns. These ariel shots are worthwhile looking at and seeing where exactly the rice is growing is cool.

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Fresh Water Resources

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:45 PM

How much of the Earth's water is fresh water?  How much of that is used for industrial, agricultural or domestic uses?  Why is groundwater becoming increasingly utilized?  Enjoy this TED-ED video for the answers. 


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Agron S. Dida's comment, December 17, 2013 5:33 AM
Ben, there is a good link about the lack of water: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216154330.htm#.UrAC_n3F2FA.twitter
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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Americans eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world, but habits are starting to change. This may be in part because of health and environmental concerns. We explore some of the meat trends and changes in graphs and charts.

 

Often we hear about the dietary impact of meat consumption at the personal scale, but what are the environmental impacts of heavy meat consumption on a global scale?  Even more telling than the podcast are the charts and infographics that are connected to this article.  Not all meats have the same environmental impact (beef is much less environmentally efficient than chicken, pork or turkey).   As globalization has spread, American cultural preferences have changed worldwide taste preferences.  As the global population rises, the impact of meat consumption is now a major environmental concern. 


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