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Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
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More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift

More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
After four decades of mass migration to the U.S., more Mexicans are now returning home.

Via Seth Dixon
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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:44 PM

With less jobs now in the u.s. and the economic growth in Mexico this is a good reason for Mexicans to head back home. What people do not realize at least I did not is the fact that there is a lot of entrepreneurship on the streets of Mexico. Since 2000 the changes that have occurred in Mexico is economy, education, politics and lower birth rates. 

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:17 PM

The first thing I thought while I was reading this was "I wonder if Donald Trump, and his flock of moron followers have seen these statistics?" I mean, never let the truth get in the way of a good hate speech right?! But as I continued reading I couldn't help but worry about the effect this could have on the American economy. The truth is that illegal's do the work we aren't willing to do. Do you know any American kids who want to work in the fields of Alabama picking watermelon's for $5 an hour? Hell, do you know any American kids who want to work, period? Do I actually think a watermelon is worth $13?

John Puchein's curator insight, December 4, 2015 6:51 AM

Due to a Mexican economy rebounding and a slow down in the American economy making it harder to find jobs, we are seeing a change in Mexican immigration patterns. While this has been suspected for years, Pew research finalized a study. 

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Maquiladoras are a well-known example of developed countries outsourcing factory work that is cited as a factor leading to de-industrialization in the Northeastern USA.  While many geography classes discuss this macro spatial reorganization, this link challenges us to look at the micro spatial systems of maquiladoras that make them economically efficient.  Some good graphs, maps and images.  


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


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Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:44 AM

While our government is perpetually mired in gridlock, the Mexican government is making lasting reforms to their nation. News attention on Mexico is almost always negative. While the violence and the drug trade are serious issues,  not enough attention is being devoted to the rapid growth of the Mexican economy. Politicians in Mexico are coming together to create an environment for positive economic growth. The article describes three factors that are leading to the growth of the Mexican economy. The first factor is Mexico's geographic location. Being located right next door to the United States is an enormous advantage for Mexico. Industrial goods are easily and cheaply being transported across the border. The second factor is the ever controversial NAFTA. The agreement ratified during the Clinton Administration allows for Mexican goods to be sold at lower rates than their Asian counterparts. The final factor is wages. The cheap labor environment has made the nation a manufacturing hub. So what can the United States learn from Mexico? Many of their economic advantages are not applicable to our country. However, we can look to Mexico for an example of functioning government. It well past time that our political parties come together and actually try to govern our nation.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:47 PM

Wow, what an interesting article about the direction Mexico is taking off on. Their GDP is increasing and the worker's wages are surprising better than Chinese workers. Both are huge exports of good and as a younger country than China, Mexico is on it's way to manufacture and economic boom. As neighbor country to Mexico, I am curious to see the actions U.S will take to learn and mirror Mexico's growth.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 2017 11:32 PM

Gives a visual of migration trends and can connect to current events or historical events.