AP Human Geography Education
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U.S. Aging Population - C-SPAN Video Library

U.S. Aging Population - C-SPAN Video Library | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Richard Jackson talked about the economic, social, geopolitical, and demographic implications of the aging of the U.S. population, and he responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. Dr.

 

This video highlights the effects of the later stages of the demographic transition on economics, politics and cultural institutions on the most developed countries in the world.    


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:08 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of the dependency ratio and the population pyramid. As the population ages, the dependency ratio increases as the elder population brackets of the population pyramid require funds from the working class population to sustain themselves.

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Summit will bring leaders together to discuss region's 'brain drain'

Summit will bring leaders together to discuss region's 'brain drain' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
An upcoming summit in Huntingburg, Ind.will bring together rural community leaders to tackle the issue of 'brain drain.'...

 

This issue of brain drain is not only one that impacts less developed countries, but it is also visible in rural parts of the developed world on a smaller scale.   Fundamentally, it is a geographic issue as the economics, job opportunities and cultural amenities impact the demographic profile of places. 


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The Beginning of the End for Suburban America

The Beginning of the End for Suburban America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Beginning of the End for Suburban America...

 

A provocative title, but are our cities and urban settlement patterns shifting?  Is sprawl going to be curtailed by cultural, environmental and economic forces?


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The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, February 10, 2014 10:10 AM

When suburban areas starting increasing, it had several advantages- Bigger homes, better education, a yard to call your own. These advantages are beginning to be shadowed by several factors that are actually pushing people out of these suburban areas and changing the urban pattern in our cities. Will people start to swarm in the central business district, or will rural areas reign? -Brooke

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:34 PM

This article shows how trends in energy consumption and the economy can affect geographies of development. After WWII, the United States hit an unprecedented economic boom. Large amounts of cheap oil combined with economic growth spurred the development of infrastructure and cities dependent on automobiles. Since people no longer had to live in the cities to work in them, they began developed outside of the city. Today, oil is becoming more and more expensive, which could mean the end of the age of the automobile. Since cities remain to be hubs of employment and business, people can no longer afford to drive long distances for their daily commutes. People are beginning to move into cities or along public transportation lines in order to more feasibly get to work. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:39 PM

Over the past 10-15 years, the suburbs grew dramatically, and have become less popular.  In the early 2000s it thrived because the economy was doing well, and technological advances were in hyper speed.  I was a bit shocked that it's slowed and that it's being reported that suburbs are coming to an end, but then it it started to make sense.  The unemployment rate was extremely high, as were gas prices.  It only makes sense that less people would be building or buying larger home with bigger cars and more appliances.  But, it was possibly better for our environment.  Less miles being driven means less pollution by cars, less electricity being used never hurts.  But now, gas prices have dropped again, and the unemployment rate has dropped as well. But, today we have so many alternatives to gasoline run cars and common electricity, that even if suburbs made a huge comeback, they wouldn't be the same as they were before.

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How China can help Europe get out of debt

How China can help Europe get out of debt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How it can halt the European debt crisis.

 

The economic struggles of one country, in the era of globalization and supranational organizations such as the E.U., have an increasingly wider area of impact with larger ripples in the pond.


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The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


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David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 2015 4:33 PM

This was a pretty cool article. I liked how it started with this specific census being the least broadcasted/talked about compared to any other census. The first thing that came to my mind once reading this is racism... In either case, it was a good read.

Throughout the article I kept thinking about natural reasons why people move. For example, its too hot, the winter is a burden, but also natural disasters, like Katrina. I know there was a large population of Katrina refugees whom fled to Texas, specifically Houston, right after the Hurricane struck. This of course would explain the sudden increase in the black population of Houston but also why the population has not increased or rather gone down over the past 5-10 years.

Im sure natural disasters as well as the basic weather motivate individuals to move but the socioeconomic reasoning cannot be ignored. For example the article mentioned lower cost(s) of living in certain cities migrated to by African Americans. A cheaper cost of living is attractive to any one person whom is strapped for cash. Social reasoning can be determined through racial issues in certain cities, education, family or rather long distance family/friend relations. 

This article was written in 2011. It would be interesting to view the most recent census in regards to this topic. As well as brainstorm the statistics and why they are... the way they are. 

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"It's Not My Mountain Anymore"

"It's Not My Mountain Anymore" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"First-hand accounts of profound experiences and mountain living in rural Appalachia."

 

This book touches on important themes.  In our rush to strengthen the economic vitality of our urban areas, what are the cultural and environmental impacts within rural areas?  This nostalgic look at a bygone era also exemplifies the concept of "place" as a geographic term, and the deep emotional attachments that it evokes in so many.


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Online Maps: 50+ Tools and Resources

Online Maps: 50+ Tools and Resources | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mapping is a huge and growing sector, from social maps for sharing with friends, to mashing up Google Maps in every possible way."

 

You know that the technology exists for you to link your online information with maps...but not sure how to go about it?  This link from mashable.com lists over 50 sites that specialize is visually representing your data, information or projects.  Online mapping is not just for the experts, but being democratized ...online mapping for the masses! 


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Rural US Disappearing? Population Share Hits Low - ABC News

Rural US Disappearing? Population Share Hits Low - ABC News | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ghost Towns: Rural U.S.Disappearing...

 

1910: 72% of USA rural

2010: 16% of USA rural

 

This stark reversal has profoundly reshaped our society.  The patterns noted in Peirce Lewis's 1972 classic article "Small Town in Pennsylvania" have just continued and accelerated.  Critical questions: What forces are driving the change?  What other parts of society are impacted by this shift?


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 3:41 PM

I think society itself evolves from the past. Alot of new ventures emerge and society adapts to that. Alot of rural areas have evaporated as a new force of urban planning has emerged where more developed cities have increased and more small cities are being recognized and developed into a more open society. Ghost towns are being more destroyed and created into a opportunity where a driven society will create businesses  for people with no jobs.

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:44 PM

People move from rural areas to urban areas in the US. This pattern has shifted the notion the founder fathers had when creating this great nation when they envisioned a mostly farming society where people own the land.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 28, 2016 2:38 PM

New article URL link here

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Is Manufacturing Falling Off the U.S. Radar Screen?

Is Manufacturing Falling Off the U.S. Radar Screen? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
As companies move production overseas and as other industries grow faster, manufacturing is accounting for a smaller share of the economy. And the nation has no distinct plan for the sector’s future.

 

This article is full of applications for global economic restructuring, post-industrial economics, outsourcing, rust-belt decline, rise of China, etc.  


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Where are the people of color in national parks?

Where are the people of color in national parks? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
While the American public has grown increasingly diverse in the last decade, black and Hispanic-Americans remain underrepresented in visits to U.S. national parks, according to a new report.

 

What factors help to explain the differences in National park visitations between?  What does this say about the United States from a cultural perspective?


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Southern California hit by major power failure: An (UN)Natural Disaster

Southern California hit by major power failure: An (UN)Natural Disaster | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Failure of a major transmission line in Southern California has cut power to millions of people in the U.S. and Mexico, and electricity could be out into Friday, utility officials say.

 

I'm thinking of my family in San Diego, but after experiencing some electrical failures in Rhode Island due to Hurricane Irene, it got me thinking of a new geographic reality.  The way modern Americans live is entirely dependent on electrical energy that to experience a disruption is essentially the equivalent of a natural disaster.  This speaks to the human-environmental interaction "theme" of geography since most Americans can't sustain their lives for more than 72 hours without electricity.  We urbanites have detached ourselves from the land and "low-tech" to an alarming degree.  We've created a sitatuation that leads to (un)natural disasters without our technological gadgets that have become our necessities.  


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Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service

Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...

 

Will a river flood soon?  A very important local, and intensely geographic question.  This site has data for thousands of rivers in the USA, to assess when flooding might occur, and how severe the flooding may be .  This Hydrograph shows the Pawtuxet River in Cranston RI (from my neck of the woods).  Students can do more with data than we often allow them in classroom settings

(For national map, click on "RIVERS" under the NATIONAL tab). 


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Keeping Tabs on Learning With a Tablet

Keeping Tabs on Learning With a Tablet | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Vote for my project at LimeadesForLearning.com. Limeades for Learning is a partnership between SONIC and DonorsChoose.org that supports public school teachers across the U.S. Just visit the site now and vote daily.

 

This is a plug for a geography teacher to get better resources in her classroom...just click "vote for this project" to help her out. 


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Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography

Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fun visualization about the geography of sports fans, specifically where can you get a radio signal for games for the Red Sox or Yankees games.  


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:16 PM

Now this is very interesting.  First of all I live along the coast of Eastern Connecticut, which essentially is a battleground between New York and Boston.  Sure there is Patriots and Jets/Giants, Celtics and Knicks, but nothing is comparable to the Red Sox and Yankees rivalry.  Fortunately my area is covered by the New York radio stations, as well as the Boston stations, but in an area where you're either "for them or for us" it's almost a judgement depending on which team you favor.  Growing up it was always fun to have half your friends root for the Red Sox, and half for the Yankees.  Yet as I've grown older I've realized it's much more geographical and territorial than I had ever thought.  Hands down, the best rivalry in American sports, and I'm lucky enough to be right in the middle of it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:15 AM

(North America topic 1)
This map of Red Sex vs. Yankees radio coverage caught my eye for 2 reasons. First, the general divide between radio broadcasts seems mostly identical to a map I've seen about fans by county and city. I wonder if the fans caused the coverage, OR if the coverage made the fans?? Hmm...

Also, I couldn't help but notice the uncannily-large Yankee coverage area posted right in the middle of Rhode Island. I'd think that Hartford would have a larger circle.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:39 PM

New England's most famed baseball team! The Red Sox have a storied rivalry with the New York Yankees from the 2004 MLB Playoffs where the Sox won the last four games of the ALCS to be the first team ever to win a series from being 3 games down and on the brink of elimination in all their remaining games in that series. They also compete with the Yankees with radio broadcasts. Fans mainly in Rhode Island, Massachusetts listen to the Red Sox radio Broadcasts. The areas up for dispute where there is competition is extreme southern Rhode Island, Western Connecticut, and areas on Long Island, and Greenwich Connecticut have people who listen to both broadcasts/

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Twitter Experiment- "The Social Media Classroom"

Dr. Rankin, professor of History at UT Dallas, wanted to know how to reach more students and involve more people in class discussions both in and out of the ...

 

Cell phones and social media are sometimes viewed as the anti-thesis of paying attention and staying engaged in class.  I'm doing this for the first time this semester, what I am calling "the Social Media Classroom" and so far, it's been fruitful.  


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Grammie's comment, September 16, 2011 11:19 PM
the classes are ready for this.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 17, 2011 4:06 PM
I think that classes are ready for this...but not all professors are. It is a paradigm shift, but a worthwhile endeavor to at least give it an honest effort.
Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 21, 2014 5:35 PM

This video was all about getting students to voice their opinions and communicate in the classroom. Sometimes, raising your hand to ask questions and particpate can be hard for some personalities. Using Twitter for the classroom discussion gets everyone's input. Shy students really benefit from using this platform for classroom discussions. Texting can continue throughout the semester-- even when school isn't in session using social media to drive the conversation.

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What your state is the worst at – United States of shame

What your state is the worst at – United States of shame | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

And the United States of Awesome, what any state is best at.  This could lead to some humorous, but also engaging discussion--hopefully without the negative stereotypes.  Thanks Danbury HS! 


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Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:46 PM

Many interesting things on this map! I'm not surprised to see that Rhode Island comes in number one in drug use, growing up I always was aware of how easy it was to get through friends of friends, and it is a big part of even the High School culture. I thought it was the same everywhere until I began to venture out. Massachusetts having the worst drivers adds cruel truth to the idea of "Massholes," but I was born there myself and I do love the place, as horrible as it is to drive in there. I've personally found Boston easier to drive in than Providence, but that might be just because I'm one of them and don't know it!

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 2017 11:32 PM

Gives a visual of migration trends and can connect to current events or historical events.

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Why Density Works

Why Density Works | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A study of 339 present-day hunter-gatherer groups demonstrated that after 'every doubling of population, the home ranges of [those] groups increased by only 70 percent': Every additional person requires less land than the previous one."

 

This is a very quick, but scientific explanation of why living in dense configurations works.  Not that it's without problems, but it's functionality in an era of population growth is clear.   

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Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau

Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Over 10 lesson plans for teaching demographics, migration, the demographic transition and more.  Included is a teaching packet, "making population real" specifically for the AP curriculum produced by the venerable Martha Sharma. 


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SportsNation: Polls - ESPN

SportsNation: Polls - ESPN | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
SportsNation is the place for sports fans to express their opinions and interact with ESPN.

 

Strange, but let me explain.  The polls on ESPN (e.g.-"What conference should Texas go to?"  Map from summer 2010) display maps to show the voting patterns.  Not surprising to geographers, there are oftentimes strong regional biases.  Creating an activity to incorporate sports into geographic analysis can sometimes grab the attention of reluctant students.  Teaching in Rhode Island, I like to show several maps that show strong New England bias against the national consensus. 


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Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene

Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nearly a week after Hurricane Irene drenched New England with rainfall in late August 2011, the Connecticut River was spewing muddy sediment into Long Island Sound and wrecking the region's farmland just before harvest.

 

The effects of the flooding in Vermont and New Hampshire graphically manifested on the downstream parts of the watershed.  Good image for showing fluvial deposition and stream load.   


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:04 PM
Fantastic image, One thing that isn't mentioned is the potential effect that this will have an marine navigation. With such a massive movement of sediment, it's hard to imagine that there won't be deposits left throughout the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. This can have a tremendous impact on boats traversing the waterways, when a foot of sediment can be the difference between safe passage and running aground.
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Geography Teaching Documents

Geography Teaching Documents | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An APHG veteran teacher has complied tried and true assignments for you to use in your geography classes, tailored to the AP curriculum.  Thank you Leslie!  You do Mount Tabor High School proud. 


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"Remember 9/11 with Google Earth" Trending Maps

"Remember 9/11 with Google Earth" Trending Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Remember 9/11 with Google Earth, Part 1: The past With the 10 year anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks coming up in a few days, we thought we’d look at some ways to use Google Earth to...

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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 10, 2012 10:08 PM
As the focus of my presentation, this is of particular interest to me. Its a really great resource and very interesting how the images can be made to fade to the back. This is a resource I could use in my classroom one day.
Sandy Montoya's comment, September 8, 2013 6:56 PM
Its amazing how with technology one could relive and re-see what once was there. In this picture and article students in the next couple of generations can learn about 9/11 in class because it was a major event in history.
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AP Central-AP Human Geography Exam

AP Central-AP Human Geography Exam | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The 2011 FRQ (Free Response Questions) with samples and rubrics are now available online.


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"Population Education"

"Population Education" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Population Education...

 

This site has resources tailored for elementary, middle and high school (and very adaptable and applicable for several college courses).  The site, the education wing of populationconnection.com, recently has updated their content with a new emphasis on what the world will be like at 7 billion.  Games, readings, videos, quizzes, etc. 


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Grammie's comment, September 13, 2011 2:03 PM
great,I couldn't agree more, G