AP Human Geography Education
8.7K views | +0 today
Follow
AP Human Geography Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:14 PM

I found this article most interesting, having lived in RI, NJ, GA, IN, MD, and TX. After awhile, you will start to pick up certain words, while dropping other similar words that I have used all of my life. The words and phrases both tend to change from one state to another. Read the article, it is enlightening. Fred Issa,

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you're feeling particularly nationalistic, or just want to see how consistently you speak like your friends and neighbors, here are all the dialect quizzes that I could find. Find out what your dialect most resembles, and, in many cases, help science at the same time!

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:42 PM

Enligsh dialects looks interesting! If I have a chance later, I want to know more about it :)

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 12, 2014 11:07 AM

Take a few of these quizzes and be ready to share your reaction to your results!

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From The Hunger Games trilogy: different perspectives on the country of Panem.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 2014 8:16 PM

If you have ever read the Hunger Games series , then you were probably curious on where the districts are located. These are some interpretations that other people have made to try and fulfill the Hunger Games fans needs for a conclusion . You could even see what district you would live in if you lived in Panem. 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:32 PM

I have never seen this movie, however my sister is very intelligent with every aspect of it. Panem is the country in which The Hunger Games takes place in both the book and the film. The country is separated into thirteen districts until the rebellion, reducing the number to twelve. Each district has their own job, as shown in this image. For example, one district promotes fishing, another agriculture, and also electricity. As one can see from this map, all the districts are shaped like the United States. According to my sister, Panem is classified as being the future United States. This is an interesting aspect if we think about it. One might think that from looking at this and knowing that it is going to be the "future US", that it appears that everyone will slowly drift apart and do their own thing. Everyone may end up being their own "district" in the future.  

Amber Ramirez's curator insight, October 20, 2016 2:09 PM
Ideas
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualized the LOTRs

Visualized the LOTRs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2013 3:36 PM

The Lord of the Rings was a remarkably well-defined, internally consistent geography for a work of fiction.  This map (high-res) visualizes the journey of the main characters on their epic adventure through Middle Earth.

 

Tags: English.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 15, 2013 10:32 AM
If you eve seen some of the maps they developed for this series of book, it is just incredible the amount of detail.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

History of the English Language

History of the English Language | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What we know as the English Language today has evolved over thousands of years, influenced by migrating tribes, conquering armies and peaceful trade. Do you know the origins of the language you speak? Have a look at this detailed infographic from  Brighton School of Business and Management."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2013 10:26 AM

Languages, just like cultures, are incredibly dynamic and have changed over time.  Many people like to imagine an older version of their own culture of "how it used to be" or even "how it's always was."  This is an illusion though, to pretend as though cultural change is something new.  This fantasy allows for people to nostalgically yearn for what once was, even if that perceived pristine past was but a fleeting moment in history that was shaped by many other peoples, places and times. 


Tags: English, language, culture, infographic, historical.

Christian Allié's comment, July 2, 2013 4:41 AM
Interesting scale.....thanks!
joelle's comment, July 2, 2013 10:31 AM
:-)