AP Human Geography
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AP Human Geography FRQ and Exam Breakdown

AP Human Geography FRQ and Exam Breakdown | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2015 4:48 PM

This outstanding infographic from the Human Imprint is an excellent summary of the AP Human Geography exam and gives some valuable insights to prepare students to pass the exam.  This is well worth the read for any APHG teacher.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 5, 2015 4:15 PM

This chart is loaded with useful data about the AP Exam.  If you're looking to focus your studying this deserves some of your time (as well as your "verbs" sheet from class

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UN News - UN body stresses vital role of geospatial data to achieving sustainable development goals

UN News - UN body stresses vital role of geospatial data to achieving sustainable development goals | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Geographic information about people and the planet is critical to making better decisions and using resources more wisely, and will be vital to achieving the new Sustainable Development Goals that countries have recently agreed on, according to a United Nations expert on the issue.
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Summer work and unit 6

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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Free online textbook, being beta tested--but might make a great secondary resource!
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100 Photos Inside North Korea - Part 1 - Earth Nutshell

100 Photos Inside North Korea - Part 1 - Earth Nutshell | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
I visited North Korea for 16 days in 2014 - here are 100 photos I took inside all corners of this secretive communist nation.
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Unit 4
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Texan tug-of-war

Texan tug-of-war | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More annexation on the horizon ALAMO RANCH, at the edge of San Antonio’s outer ring road, is hardly a glamorous place. New strip malls stretch along access roads;...
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Unit 7
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Abandoned Athens Olympic 2004 venues, 10 years on – in pictures

Abandoned Athens Olympic 2004 venues, 10 years on – in pictures | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A decade after Greece hosted the world’s greatest sporting extravaganza, many of its once-gleaming Olympic venues now lie abandoned
Courtney Barrowman's insight:
Unit 6-7, Reminds me of "development" pics from Brazil and the World Cup, maybe we should reconsider calling it "winning" the bid to host?!
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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:56 PM

APHG-U6

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 1

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Leslie G Perry's curator insight, June 2, 2015 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 2015 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 2015 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

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On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants

On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Jonah Fisher has been to Rakhine state in Myanmar to meet Rohingya migrants who are being forced to return home - but at a cost.

Via Seth Dixon
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unit 2

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2015 10:08 PM

The Rohingya that are in the news lately are refugees on boats that everyone agrees that SOMEONE should help, but that no country in Southeast Asia wants to bring in. 


Tags: migration, political, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:29 AM

Migration

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 29, 2015 11:53 AM

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 



Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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Geography of a Pencil

Geography of a Pencil | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Students map the origins of a pencil, predict and map trade and transport networks, and relate what they learn to globalization.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer reading KQ3,: key concepts globalization, transportation

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."


Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

Suburbanization in the United States has been a phenomenon for the past 60 or so years, and continues on to this day with massive highway transport systems centered around cars. Its no surprise with cheap suburban land and relatively easy commutes that many of the fastest growing cities in the US are seeing their growth largely in suburban areas, where many more people can afford to live than the big city.

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:07 AM

This article accurately depicts the difference between a normal city 50 years ago and a city today, as well as the continuing spread of suburbanization. For example, Austin, the capital of texas, a hustling, bustling always busy area, is predominantly suburban. As cities and countries continue to advance and develop and its citizens become more successful and family oriented, suburban homes for families will become more needed than something smaller, like condos or studio apartments. As the needs of the cities change, the structure of the city changes as well. This applies to our final unit of APHUG: Cities and Urban Land Use.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:29 AM

Urbanization

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Cotton Candy Grapes Taste Test

Cotton Candy Grapes Taste Test | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
My burps smell like cotton candy!
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Unit 5
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Lawless oceans? 8 things people get away with on international waters

Lawless oceans? 8 things people get away with on international waters | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Waters that are open in the worst possible ways.
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Unit 4
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First day of school: Why August is the new September - CNN.com

First day of school: Why August is the new September - CNN.com | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Why start before Labor Day? Do schools hate summer? We get some answers.
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Beginning of year--
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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 8, 2015 12:08 AM

Beginning of year--

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Up on the Roof: Top-Floor Attractions Help Maximize Revenues - NYTimes.com

Up on the Roof: Top-Floor Attractions Help Maximize Revenues - NYTimes.com | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
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Unit 7
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The world reshaped

The world reshaped | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In 2015 demographers, teachers and politicians will stop talking about the population pyramid and start referring to the population dome. The change in terminology...
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unit 2

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Animaniacs - Yakko's World - HIGH QUALITY - YouTube

great song to learn the countries, and you can combine to learn the nationalities
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For fun and inspiration prior to the locational geography exam.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

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mary jane james's curator insight, April 7, 2017 2:55 PM
This video relates to my subject on religion by showing the five main religions and how they're changing the world and prospective of how people see themselves on earth.
 My opinion on the video is that is good to see that all of the religions are somewhat related by where and how they were created, and also what is shown in them.
 
Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 2017 9:53 PM
This article relates to are class because it is talking about different religions. It states that we all have different beliefs, but we believe in a higher power. This article was interesting because it shows you how different your beliefs are to other religions. They all have a story they believe is true.
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:27 AM
Unit 3 - Religion
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Prayer in Various Global Faiths

Prayer in Various Global Faiths | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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unit 3

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 12:15 PM

See how people around the world pray...video examples of prayer and the cultural/spiritual significance are shown highlighting Buddhists, Mormons, and Sikhs.  Place is very important component to prayer for many and the 4th example shows how some use a labyrinth as a tool to commune with the divine.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, Buddhism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:54 AM

unit 3

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.


Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 5

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:27 AM

Ag Unit

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 11:55 AM

This article is a little sad. If you're traveling across the world and want to take pictures for memories, using a backdrop would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Tourists use a backdrop to show the Hong Kong skyline on a clear and sunny day because you have trouble seeing it most days due to all of the pollution. It's crazy that you cannot even take a picture of the actual skyline because the pollution is so bad. This temporary fix has overlooked that actual problem here. People are fascinated that they are being provided with an alternative of what it would look like but something should be done so that people can actually experience the real thing. This backdrop is putting a band-aid on the issue in the mean time but all of this pollution is not safe and something needs to be done to start fixing it. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.

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River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary

River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary: It all comes down to ... Geography.

 

This natural and physical border is examined by @josephkerski.


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Unit 4: natural and physical boundaries

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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Summer reading KQ1

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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 8, 3:24 PM
The animation in this video depicts how Central America and the Caribbean’s landforms came to be.  What is interesting is that about 170 million years ago, Africa and South America were part of the same land mass and today Africa is pretty far away from South America.  This means that there are probably similar geographic features on the two continents, like rocks or soil, despite the distance between them now.  That may contribute to people being able to grow similar crops in the two areas that are oftentimes seen as so different.  The western part of South America, specifically Central America seems to have been pulled apart from North America.  This means that these two continents may share geographic features as well.  Although regions may seem like they are separated by great lengths and should be dissimilar from each other, that is not the case- as the tectonic plates are constantly shifting the way the earth’s surface looks.  It’s hard to think that the earth was ever different than it is today and how such large land masses could possibly move so far.  This animation does a good job of exemplifying the great effect that tectonic plates actually have.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 5:36 PM
It's interesting to see how the earth's surface has changed over time.  It's also strange to see that at one point the Americas were so compact, and that Africa was attached to both North and South America.  Although these tectonic shifts take place over the course of millions of years, this video makes me wonder what the globe will look like in another million years, or another 100 million years.  I'm sure the continents will be in a new configuration as unrecognizable as they were 170 million years ago.
Christina Caruso's curator insight, February 9, 5:40 PM
This video it talks about Plate Tectonics and how south America pulled away from North America starting 170 million years ago. I have learned a lot about plate tectonics in Oceanography this semester.