AP Human Geography
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From Risking His Life To Saving Lives, Ex-Coal Miner Is Happy To Take The Paycut

From Risking His Life To Saving Lives, Ex-Coal Miner Is Happy To Take The Paycut | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The "Brave New Workers" series tells stories of Americans adapting to a changing economy. This week: after years working in the coal mines of West Virginia, a miner charts a new career in health care.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 5:03 PM

This series, Brave New Workers, is all about workers adapting to the shifting economic geographies.  Some industries are seen as foundational to a community and there is much angst about the loss of particular jobs.  New technologies are disruptive, and the process of job creation/job loss is sometimes referred to as creative destruction.  My uncle, once about a time, was a typewriter repairman.  Clearly, the personal computer was going to render his niche in the economic system obsolete so he became a web developer.  Not everyone successfully makes a seamless transition, but this collection of stories is emblematic of the modern American worker, needing to nimbly adapt to the labor market.

 

Tagspodcast, industry, manufacturinglabor, economic, USA.  

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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2016 1:14 PM

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

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Imaginary Geographies

Imaginary Geographies | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
This fabulous 1927 map shows some of the key reasons why the movie industry flourished in Los Angeles–California’s physical geography is incredibly diverse. As the industry was emerging in the first half of the 20th century, they didn’t have massive budgets to travel the world to give their locations a great degree of geographic accuracy it their set locations. Southern California was the ideal home base for a wide range of locations that could physically approximate so many environments and ecosystems. This cost saving strategy had more than economic ramifications; this strategy reinforced many spatial (and cultural) stereotypes in the movies that powerfully influenced how people conceptualized what these places were like. These geographies of cinematic imagination, created for economic purposes, shape our regional perceptions.

 

Tags: place, California, landscape, popular culture, industry.


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unit 3

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:17 AM

This is really cool. The movie industry thrives in California for many reasons. Good weather was a major one, but having so many different "climate types" in one area was very beneficial.  

sharon siwela's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:59 AM

couldn't agree with this more.

FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:20 PM

Going to California next week and this is really interesting!

 

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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


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Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today? key concept of transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2015 12:45 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:11 AM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


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unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:32 PM

unarguably one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:05 PM

unit 6

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

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Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:30 PM
This would be a very new approach.
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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:17 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


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Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

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Special Economic Zones

Special Economic Zones | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are the most rapidly spreading kind of city, having catapulted exports and growth from Mauritius and the Dominican Republic to Shenzhen and Dubai -- and now across Africa. Today more than 4000 SEZs dot the planet, a major indication of our transition towards the "supply chain world" explored in Connectography.  See more maps from Connectography and order the book here."

 

Tags: globalization, urban, economic, industry, regions.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

Economic activity

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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 1, 2016 2:21 PM
VISUALIZANDO LA ECONOMÍA GLOBAL
Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

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unit 2

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:17 PM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, labor, Nigeria, podcast, 

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Unit 6

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:04 AM

Mapas ...

Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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new vocabulary for us all and unit 5!

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Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 27, 2016 12:31 PM
unit 5
Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:30 PM
This would be a very new approach.
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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


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unit 6 key concepts development, poverty, globalization, industry, labor

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:12 PM

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

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Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 11:55 AM

This article is a little sad. If you're traveling across the world and want to take pictures for memories, using a backdrop would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Tourists use a backdrop to show the Hong Kong skyline on a clear and sunny day because you have trouble seeing it most days due to all of the pollution. It's crazy that you cannot even take a picture of the actual skyline because the pollution is so bad. This temporary fix has overlooked that actual problem here. People are fascinated that they are being provided with an alternative of what it would look like but something should be done so that people can actually experience the real thing. This backdrop is putting a band-aid on the issue in the mean time but all of this pollution is not safe and something needs to be done to start fixing it. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.