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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Access to safe drinking water is a physical and human geography issue because it all depends on location. For example, in Dhaka, a heavily populated area, fresh water is limited. Besides waters/rivers in Dhaka being polluted, this is a poverty filled area and government funds can only get so much for people. Dhaka is a poor, urban, and populated community.

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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:16 PM

The Ukraine is divided along Ethno-linguitic lines. Even within the borders of Ukraine there are contrast in the characteristics of local communities. Some identify with Russia, others with Ukraine. The borders of Ukraine are likely to change because there are such differences between its citizens.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:08 PM

Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Thousands of protesters in the capital city of Kiev are calling for Yanukovych to step down. This is a potentially big moment for Ukraine, as well as for Europe: Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe? What's happening in Ukraine is complicated and driven by many factors: the country's history as an unhappy component of the Soviet Union, its deep economic woes, a sense of cultural fondness for the West, wide discontent with government corruption, two decades of divided politics and a sense that Yanukovych caved to Putin.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:23 AM

It is unfortunate to see this happening.  Ukrainians want to be connected to Europe not Russia.  The divide between the people ad the President is quite large.  This makes me wonder if Putin is promising Yanukovych with a monetary bribe.  Or if Putin is threatening Yanukovych.  

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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

James Piccolino's curator insight, January 31, 6:41 PM
The link to this doesn't work, but I managed to search it out.Some of these terms are really out there. I thought I knew a lot of these but I was mistaken. One thing I am not surprised by is the fact that I do not follow all of the Rhode Island/ New England lines. I seem to not have an accent like many have here, apparently I can add vocabulary to that list. I actually say many of the terms that go with other areas of the US.
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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:06 PM

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:06 AM

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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The 11 American nations, in one map

The 11 American nations, in one map | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

Red states and blue states? Flyover country and the coasts? How simplistic. Colin Woodard, a reporter at the Portland Press Herald and author of several books, says North America can be broken neatly into 11 separate nation-states, where dominant cultures explain our voting behaviors and attitudes toward everything from social issues to the role of government.

“The borders of my eleven American nations are reflected in many different types of maps — including maps showing the distribution of linguistic dialects, the spread of cultural artifacts, the prevalence of different religious denominations, and the county-by-county breakdown of voting in virtually every hotly contested presidential race in our history,” Woodard writes in the Fall 2013 issue of Tufts University’s alumni magazine. “Our continent’s famed mobility has been reinforcing, not dissolving, regional differences, as people increasingly sort themselves into like-minded communities.”

Take a look at his map.

 


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:54 PM

The first thing I noticed about this map, and really liked, was that the nations extend past the borders of the United States. That allows these nations to reflect the similarities shared among large regions. These cultural, economic, and political regions reflect something that extends beyond the political borders of any one country. Southern Arizona is very similar to Mexico just like Northern Idaho is similar to Canada. The region labeled the Far West lumps together many different areas, likely because of the similar geography. However, there is more diversity in these areas than the map shows, for example there is a fairly big difference between the culture and political beliefs of Nevada and Utah, and western New Mexico is very different from Montana.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:31 PM

The way this map has been broken up is rather accurate. With the Greater Appalachia, stretching through West Virginia and into northwest Texas. Also, El Norte being separated due to the linguistic differences that have always been around that area.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 6:47 PM

This article was very interesting because it gave you a different way to look at not only the Unites States but the North American continent as well. I never realized that this continent can be broken into 11 separate nation-states. These 11 different divisions all represent and explain the different cultures or view points of the people living in them. The divisions can be a result anywhere from voting choices, social issues, religious beliefs, or just that particular type of community. I live in the Yankeedom. Northeastern states value education and are more comfortable with government regulation versus other areas. I was unaware that within the El Norte region, southwest Texas and the border region is the oldest and most different in America. Areas where independence was valued more had higher levels of violent deaths rather than the areas that had more government interventions.

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:39 AM

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:01 AM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


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RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:48 PM

As you review the resource map noting the locations of the emptiest and most crowded places on Earth, take note on where these places are located.  What do you see?  Why do you think they are crowded or uninhabitable?  What are your thoughts?  What amazed you?

Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence

A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
More than 1 million flag-draped and face-painted Catalans held hands and formed a 250-mile human chain across the northeastern Spanish region Wednesday in a demonstration of their desires for independence.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:40 PM

While the early 20th century saw the rise of nationalism leading to the destruction of empires and birth of nations based upon culture not all cultures achieved this. An example of this today is in Catalonia within Spain. The people of Catalonia wish to separate themselves from the rest of Spain and become an individual free nation. Unfortunately for them Spain has no intentions of letting them go and few within the UN are siding against Spain.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:18 PM

There are a lot of unknown countries in the world, for instance Catalonia. A country that is independently located in Spain, Catalonia is one that is rarely heard of. With recent countries wanting to claim independence from their larger states, its looks like Catalonia wants a piece of the pie. Though coming to a place of self-governance is a mile stone, it also comes at a high sticker prize. They not only have to develop national recognition by other states in the world union, they have to be able to produce commodity that is able to compete on a global level. These countries wanting to claim independence have a long way to go.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 2:08 PM

Until pretty recently, I wasn't even aware of Catalonia, nevermind their hope for independence. I didn't know that they didn't consider themselves Spain, but another place entirely.  But, because they've been considered part of Spain for so long, it seems like independence from Spain could be hard to achieve. However, holding marches and things like this are a great way to get a movement going, as long as it doesn't become violent or any sort of serious public disturbance, because that never solves anything.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 2014 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:26 PM

unit 3

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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

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Miguel Alfaro's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:51 PM

Informacion de Latinos en los Estados Unidos.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities. 

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 9, 2017 7:19 AM

https://geographyeducation.org/courses/regional-geography-geog-400/modern-slavery/

 

This article describes when people in Africa are victims of modern day slavery. It tells us how people are forced into working long long hours a day with no breaks, barely any food or water and a very unsafe working environment. Some examples of what these poor people are forced into working as are laborers, prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides. Many people are also forced into marriages and illegal mining and smuggling of goods across borders . There are currently about 30 million modern day slaves all over the world. Their mostly in large parts of Africa and most of India. There's also some in Europe and in the U.S. One of the most unsafe working environment these slaves are forced into working in are the illegal mining projects. Their forced to work long hours in a mine that could collapse any second with nothing but a cheap flashlight tied to their head and a shovel or spade. 

 

I think this article connects to what were working on in class about modern slavery and Africa. I think this is very sad because I think everybody has the right to do what they feel like and deserve their freedom just like most people. This is extremely unfair and I think that more people should try and do something about it. Of course there are already loads of people trying to prevent this issue from spreading and I think it's a very kind and respectful thing to do. I did learn a lot from this article tho and the TED talk. One thing I learned was that this problem mostly appears in Africa. I honestly though that Asia and more parts of South America would have this issue as well. So yes, I learned quite a lot from this and I think that it was a good article with lots of useful information and I got a lot of emotional feelings from seeing the video.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Ap human geography | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Ap human geography | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.