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Unit Two: Population and Migration- Patterns of fertility, mortality, and healt Infant mortality down by 30% in past decade

Unit Two: Population and Migration- Patterns of fertility, mortality, and healt Infant mortality down by 30% in past decade | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it



The wide gap between rural and urban areas in infant death rates continues in India but is declining . Rural IMR in 2012 was 46 infant deaths per 1000 live births while the urban rate was 28. In fact, the rural IMR declined by 30% compared to the urban decline of 28% since 2003.

 

More at Original: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Infant-mortality-down-by-30-in-past-decade/articleshow/24503069.cms


Via nrip
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Tamil Nadu has halved its infant mortality rate in the past decade while many other states have decreased their mortality rate by 40%. Infant mortality rate is viewed as a key marker of wellbeing administrations, healthful levels, neediness and instructive level of the individuals. 

 

II. In developing countries, infant mortality is caused from a lack of medical attention. Developing countries do not have the technology needed for childbirth, ultrasounds and x-rays in order to perform diagnostics on pregnant women. However, with today’s extensive and better run primary health services, some women can get the attention they need. 

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Unit Six: Women in labor force- Women | Farming First

Unit Six: Women in labor force- Women | Farming First | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Women make 43% of the agricultural work force in developing countries, yet work longer hours than men, work at labor intensive tasks, but have smaller wages than men. In addition to intensive labor, women also are responsible for taking care of the households, while their access to productive resources and services are limited. 

 

II. I thought that this excerpt from the newsletter "Farming First" was very informative and helpful. The graphs illustrating the inequality of women gave me an idea of how unequal the agricultural system is with female labor. 

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Unit 6- Urbanization: The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America ... an increasing case for urbanization

Unit 6- Urbanization: The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America ... an increasing case for urbanization | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Dylan Simon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Proximity to employment can influence a range of economic and social outcomes, particularly low-income and minority workers. Based on a census tract, demographic data revealed that the number of jobs within the commute distance decreased, along with the decrease of the number of jobs in city and suburban areas, and the decline of job proximity in areas with high poverty and majority-minority neighborhoods. 

 

II. This is not surprising to hear that with suburbanization, the commute to work places increased and job proximity decreased. This is because the suburbs tend to be located outside of the central business district, that is the main hub for work places. As families grow, they move out to the suburbs, thus increasing distance between them and their workplace. 

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Unit Four- Gerrymandering: Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Unit Four- Gerrymandering: Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 14, 2015 2:10 PM

Unit 4 but used in class-- cannot be used for scoop it summary activity!

Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

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Unit Four- Cold war- The Polish Church's Gender Problem - New York Times

Unit Four- Cold war- The Polish Church's Gender Problem - New York Times | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Matt Skallerud
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Since the fall of Communism and integration into the West, gender has become an established concept in Poland, along with the feminist and L.G.B.T. movements. During an interview, Bishop Pieronek blurted “I would like to add that the ideology of gender presents a threat worse than Nazism and Communism combined”, even though he could name any incident where gender caused a physical threat. He also believes that gay right and sex education is at odds with nature. 


II. The main reason for Poland’s misconstrued beliefs is due to their lack of sexual education, due to Poland’s fear of the church, that bands certain activities unless a resident has a certain degree of wealth, or a certain residency. It is ridiculous that Bishops believe that the sexual education will lead to abortion, masturbation at very young ages, and pedophilia.” Every supporter of these beliefs are influenced by the heavy power of the church, dictating the rights and wrongs of human rights. 

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Unit 3: Language- Politics of language: ‘Use mother tongues for primary education’ - The Express Tribune

Unit 3: Language- Politics of language: ‘Use mother tongues for primary education’ - The Express Tribune | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Charles Tiayon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Speakers said that a whole culture dies with the death of a language. Teachers in small communities believed that students should be taught in their mother languages. This use of mother languages preserves folk culture and keeps the local culture alive. 

 

II. I believe that folk culture is very important to preserve, especially in very small local communities. However, in our globalized world, many cultures have been lost due to lingua francas being used instead of mother languages in order to benefit their students. If students know the lingua franca or at least a widely known language that is spoekn outside of their local community, they are more likely to succeed with the ease of communication in education and in future employment. 

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Unit 1: How to Use and think about maps with geospatial data- Using JavaScript to Create Geospatial and Advanced Maps

Unit 1: How to Use and think about maps with geospatial data- Using JavaScript to Create Geospatial and Advanced Maps | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Geospatial Information are used to aid the visualization of complex data. Much of the work in GIS involves points, shapes, symbols, and other features. 3D Maps can be used when making chloropleths, while “turf” systems use polygons to plot data. 

 

II. I honestly thought this article was very informative but also slightly boring. However, in this article, the author notifies the reader on how to implement GIS systems and how to analyze the systems with different types of data displayed on various maps. Although GIS is a complex and innovative piece of technology that is used in a helpful way, i find it difficult to understand and a slow concept to take interest in. I believe that GIS is very helpful with geographers and their studies. 

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THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY's curator insight, May 23, 2015 3:37 AM

JavaScript fan? You can use it to create geospatial and advanced maps!

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Unit 1: Sources of Geographical Data & Census- Map of Most Common Race

Unit 1: Sources of Geographical Data & Census- Map of Most Common Race | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I.This visual shows the distribution of races in counties in the United States. The darker colors represent the denser population of a certain race. The map shows that the dominating race in the United States is white, with hispanic coming in second, then black populations, asian populations, native, and lastly, pacific islander. This census was taken over a 5 year estimate. 

 

II. I thought this map was really interesting because it allowed users to see the most common races, but also allowed users to navigate through second most common races, giving different perspectives of population and race distribution. What i thought was interesting was how the most dense regions of asian populations, mainly in Chinatown, were still significantly smaller than the less dense regions of the white races. 

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:47 PM

Summary: This map shows racial distribution throughout Baltimore.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 7 because it shows how a city has been planned and built over time around racial discrimination with areas of similar race clumped together.

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:17 AM

This census map shows the diversity of America, but also largely shows how entire counties, such as those around Baltimore and St. Louis can be seemingly segregated between races, though all persons are American. This leads to bizarre nationalism and continued ethnic and racial divides in society through the uneven distribution of race and ethnicity in the US.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:00 AM

I think it is interesting to think about the reasons where certain ethnic groups live. It is sad but also interesting to see that because of the slavery in the south, black americans make a large if not  dominant percentage of the majority  of the south. It is also interesting to see where Asian Americans living where they do because it is a newer migration pattern. This is reflected in the areas that Asians settle because of how they got to their homes.

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Unit Five: Agriculture- Major agricultural production regions- Top Agricultural Producing Countries

Unit Five: Agriculture- Major agricultural production regions- Top Agricultural Producing Countries | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Discover which countries produce the most agricultural products, which export the most and what is being done to increase production.
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. This article provides the top agricultural producers in the world. United States, China, and Brazil are the top producers of corn. China, India, and Indonesia re the top producers of rice. China, India, and the United States are the top producers of wheat. The United States is also the number one exporter of goods, exporting 118.3 billion dollars worth of goods. 

 

II. Agriculture is no longer a major employer in Europe or North America due to the lack of land access. Because of this lack of resources to have mass production, farmers are now using genetically modified organisms to produce higher crop yields and reduce the need for fertilizers and herbicides. There is a large debate on the use of GMO’s as many believe it can increase food security, while others are concerned for the unnaturalness of GMO’s and the safety of their health and the environment. 

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Unit Five- Agriculture - Environmental issues: soil degradation, overgrazing, river and aquifer depletion, animal wastes, and extensive fertilizer and pesticide use- Nepal steps up safe pest...

Unit Five- Agriculture - Environmental issues: soil degradation, overgrazing, river and aquifer depletion, animal wastes, and extensive fertilizer and pesticide use-        Nepal steps up safe pest... | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Nepal’s safe pesticide use programme now includes training for vendors who deal with farmers.

Via Sylvain Rotillon, SustainOurEarth
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Nepal’s government is looking to advance protected utilization of pesticides now in the nation. Training for farmers in order to develop the farming techniques incorporate improvement for secure deals, circulation, stockpiling and the use of pesticides.

 

II. Although it is very difficult to train all of the farmers in Nepal, farmers can be reached through vendors. The use of safer pesticides will result in a decrease in surface runoff. The surface runoff that can contaminate drinking water and cause cancer. 

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Unit Five: Agriculture - Second Agriculture Revolution- Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution

Unit Five: Agriculture - Second Agriculture Revolution- Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

(Reuters) - On a fenced plot not far from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's home, a field of mustard is in full yellow bloom. 

Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. A mustard field is in being grown in India. This field represents the government's reversal of an effective ban on field trials of genetically modified organisms. Prime Minister Modi supported the use of genetically modified crops, especially with India’s cotton harvest. However, grassroots groups associated with Modi's Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have opposed GM crops because of the reliance on seeds patented by multinationals.

 

II. To a great extent farming India got to be independent in foodgrains after the dispatch of the Green Revolution in the 1960s, when it presented high-yielding seed assortments and the utilization of compost and watering system.The test now is to duplicate that achievement in eatable oils and vegetables, which are progressively sought after.

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 11:18 AM

This story talks about the difference the second agricultural revolution has made in India. It talks about the good and the bad about it. Monsanto said it is important for these farmers to create value on their farms. This is a good representation of the second agricultural revolution

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:38 PM

Summery: This article discusses the new agricultural practices in India to feed its growing population. It's being called the "Second Green Revolution", the challenge being to replicate GMOs in the growing demand for edible oils and vegetables. 

 

Insight: This articles view on the growing agribusiness is incredibly original and insightful. India's growing population can't be supported without the use of GMOs, and their "Second Green Revolution" is just the way to solve that problem. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:05 PM

Summary: This article talks about the recent implementation of trial fields of genetically modified crops in India. They had been previously banned due to the fear of loss of biodiversity and food safety. But recently, India has been losing a lot of their arable land to urbanization, and with farm production decreasing, using genetically modified crops, or GM crops, seemed to be the only option. This, paired with their extraordinary population growth, India's crop production wouldn't have been able to sustain their growing population. 

 

Insight: This article discusses the introduction of biotechnology, specifically GM crops, into India's current agricultural industry. This introduction, although riddled with fear of loss of food safety and biodiversity, could potentially really help India handle feeding their quickly-growing population.

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Unit Five: Agriculture- Environmental issues: soil degradation, overgrazing, river and aquifer depletion, animal wastes, and extensive fertilizer and pesticide useBuzz about bee deaths: Committee h...

Unit Five: Agriculture- Environmental issues: soil degradation, overgrazing, river and aquifer depletion, animal wastes, and extensive fertilizer and pesticide useBuzz about bee deaths: Committee h... | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

A group of white suited, mud-boot stomping “Beeks” took over legislative offices Friday morning, as the group of beekeepers passed out golden-honey bears to promote their Pollinator Protection Act.

 

The sweet action by these “beeks,” as they call themselves, would establish labeling requirements for any seed, plant material or nursery stock that uses the Neonics pesticide and limits the selling of these pesticides to only qualified applicants.

 

HB 605, the Pollinator Protection Act, was heard by the Environment and Transportation committee following the entourage of honey-harvesters.

 

If enacted the bill would only allow certified applicators, including veterinarians and farmers, to buy the pesticide, taking it off the shelves of neighborhood stores. It faces opposition from a pesticide manufacturer and people concerned it could impact flea drops for pets.


Via SustainOurEarth
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. “Bee supporters” took over legislative offices to promote Pollinator Protection Act. The Pollinator Protection Act would allow certified applicators, including veterinarians and farmers, to buy the pesticide, taking it off the shelves of neighborhood stores. Honey bees are vital to numerous agricultural yields. The Pesticide is known for the exhaustion of the honey bee populace.


II. Not only to pesticides harm the environment, but the actual harming of the the insects leads to a great imbalance in the ecosystem. Bees have an important niche in the environment as they pollinate many plants and cause the growing of more plants. This is important for organic farmers and their crops as they need pollination to grow a wider variety of crops. 

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Unit Five: Agribusiness- Drought, water scare gets attention of agribusiness giant ADM

Unit Five: Agribusiness- Drought, water scare gets attention of agribusiness giant ADM | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

IDECATUR, Ill. -- At the height of this year's drought, decision-makers at the agribusiness giant Archers Daniels Midland kept an uneasy eye on the reservoir down the hill from their headquarters.

Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Lake Decatur’s water levels are fluctuating. This drop in water effects the ADM, the Archers Daniel Midland agribusiness. The company uses millions of gallons of water to turn corn and soybeans into a variety of products. The agribusiness now realizes that they must conserve water as the finding a new water source will be extremely expensive and difficult. 

 

II. An agribusiness is a group of industries focused on agricultural produce and services involving farming. Agribusinesses are major corporations that expands farming into a commercial business. ADM makes millions of dollars each year, and the depletion of water to irrigate their crops can result in a major downfall in the business. 

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Unite Five: Agriculture- Organic farming, crop rotation, value-added specialty foods, regional appellations, fair trade, and eat-local-food movement MSU organic farming study finds diverse benefits...

Unite Five: Agriculture- Organic farming, crop rotation, value-added specialty foods, regional appellations, fair trade, and eat-local-food movement MSU organic farming study finds diverse benefits... | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Using domestic sheep rather than traditional farming equipment to manage fallow and terminate cover crops may enable farmers who grow organic crops to save money, reduce tillage, manage weeds and pests, and reduce the risk of soil erosion.
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. The downfall to organic farming is soil erosion which is directly related to tillage. In order to reduce tillage, Miller, an organic farmer, decided to use sheep to graze on his fields. The sheep graze the fields for cover crop termination and weed control. The use of sheep on the fields has reduced the costs for tillage for the certified organic farm.

 

II. Similar to how early farmers used domesticated animals for clothing, food, and labor, farmers today still take advantage of the many uses of animals. The use of domesticated animals can be more beneficial in many aspects in comparison to today’s use of machinery. The use of wheat tractors and manmade pesticides are detrimental to the environment as they tear up the land and lead to surface runoff. Traditional methods are not only environmentally friendly, but can save money and resources for the farmer. 

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Unit Six- Gender Inequality Index: 5 Ways to Shatter the Glass Ceiling

Unit Six- Gender Inequality Index: 5 Ways to Shatter the Glass Ceiling | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. There are fewer large U.S. companies being led by women today than by men named John. The New York Times released the data of the "Glass Ceiling Index", measuring gender inequality in corporate leadership. While 5.3% of CEO's out of 1500 corporations are named John, only 4.1% is the total percentage of women being a CEO. This article gives advice on how to "shatter the Glass Ceiling," and break through gender inequality.

 

II. I thought this article was really interesting. It is appalling to see the small percentage of women who are CEO's in the business industry, and especially appalling to see how many more men are named John than the total number of women being CEO's in the corporations. I think that the advice the author gives women is good, for example having mental toughness and being aggressive. However, i do not think that women should have to be coached in order to get a job position. I think its wrong that some women  have to purposely act overly tough in order to validate their intelligence, while many men can be themselves yet still get the position because they do not have to compensate or prove themselves for their gender. 

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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:31 AM

This article is about the deficiency of women in charge of American businesses and reasons why women are crucial to economic success. 

 

The New York Times did a study that found that there are more CEOs in America named John (obviously men) than all women CEOs combined. This does more to shatter the perception that women are treated equally in corporate business. While some people would argue it's because that men generally are more successful and better suited for CEO than women, the article disproves that as well. Studies have shown that women have a higher emotional intelligence and perception than men—a quality that comes in handy in group settings. The lack of women at the head of corporate business is, instead, the result of historical perceptions that women were not as intelligent as men and had no place in running a business. Branching off from this is the tendency of women to adopt certain qualities in an attempt to achieve success that have come from unrealistic expectations of them. The article stresses the importance of women to use their emotions and intuition, which would bring new perspectives to the field rather than make themselves more like their male co-workers. Even in countries such as America, the GII (Gender Inequality Index) is still not zero.

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:30 PM

This article goes over one major shocking statistic within the gender inequality index. That statistic is that there are more men named John in the workplace than all women in the workplace.

 

This article connects to the Unit 6 TEK about the gender inequality index because it discusses the gender inequality issues of the workplace and how these issues can be fixed.

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:06 AM

Women across the nation have been largely suppressed, predominately in the work force. There are more CEOs named John or David than there are women. This article discusses the gender gap in work space, and also informs how to be an adequate leader as well as address gender inequality, and how to become a successful boss.

This article shows gender inequality, even in more developed nations such as the United States; however, there are ways to end the gender discrimination as well as ways to address it if you are facing the biased opinions deriving from gender.

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Unit Six- World Cities: The New World Order - In Photos: The Most Important Cities In The Developing World

Unit Six- World Cities: The New World Order - In Photos: The Most Important Cities In The Developing World | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via InfoBlaze
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Outside of the Western world, a handful of cities are fast becoming important global business players. Some of their home countries are recognizing that power and seek to create a "multi-polar" world that isn't so reliant on the U.S. and Europe. This article lists the power cities outside of the core economies of the west. 

 

II. Although this article was not very informative, it was interesting to see the most important cities in the developing world. I thought Beijing would not be included in this article because i perceived it to be a developed city. When people think of World CIties, they mainly think of the world cities of the developed nations, but this article opened up a new perspective of the most influential cities in other parts of the world. 

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Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:28 PM

Summary: This Forbes post highlights the growing importance of world cities and megacities, and lists the top 15 countries that are on heir way to becoming the most developed and connected countries in the world. Topping this list is Beijing, Shanghai, and Honk Kong. 


Insight: This relates to unit 7 in that it outlines the new world cities that are globally impacting everyone, and the growing megacities that are on their way to becoming the most globally connected and powerful. I think it's odd that the top 3 of the 15 are all in Asia, but the economic stability and spatial positioning of the continent gives it prime political and economic opportunities. 

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:14 AM

In this article it talks about how the new developing cities are growing faster than ever and will become the new world cities. This relates to the topic in unit 7 of world cities. A world city is a major city used in the trading and communications of all the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:03 AM

The most important cities in the world are not only in Western nations. They are found all over the world, ranging from developed countries such as USA with New York, to developing countries such as China with Beijing. The globalization has connected all nations together, manifesting an importance of trade and commerce.

This article pertains to cities and their characteristics, since not all important cities are in big name developed nations such as France or the UK. 

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Unit Four- Sovereignty- Pambazuka - GMOs and food sovereignty: Which way Africa?

Unit Four- Sovereignty- Pambazuka - GMOs and food sovereignty: Which way Africa? | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. African governments are under intense pressure from within but also from big agribusiness and Western governments to embrace GMOs. Kenya banned production of GMO's in 2012, therefore putting them into a food shortage. Methods of farming in Kenya no longer met the farms needs, and were thus being pushed by western governments to bring back GMO in foods to keep up with the food demand. 


II. I think that it the sovereignty of a country is very important. The country's own government should be allowed to have complete control of its own decisions and not be pressured by outside influences. However, when it comes to these means, i do believe that African countered should so whatever it takes to feed their people. The people of Kenya should not have to starve because their government wants to only produce and import all organic foods. When people's lives are at stake, the government should do whats best for their people and not for personal beliefs. 

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Unit 4-Spatial relationships between political systems and patterns of ethnicity, economy, and gende Language ‘purity’ is unobtainable goal - Global Times

Unit 4-Spatial relationships between political systems and patterns of ethnicity, economy, and gende Language ‘purity’ is unobtainable goal - Global Times | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Charles Tiayon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Chinese employees in companies talked to each other - they freely mixed English words and Chinese grammar. However, none of these workers were immigrants nor had traveled abroad. Chinese employees used English words to identify work procedures and material names, while Chinese grammar was used to create a logical train of thought. 

 

II. I think that it is good that “no language is entirely pure.” Even an english speaker in Texas knows few Spanish words because of the heavy Spanish influence in restaurants, and the large number of immigrants coming into Texas. Knowing words or grammar of another language can be vital in communication with another person in employment or in education. With the connected, globalized world, many people are bilingual and have been advantaged in education and communication with others. 

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Unit 3- Religion: Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion

Unit 3- Religion: Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. According to Pew Research Center, Christianity is on the decline across race, gender, education and geographic barriers due to three main factors. 1. Millennials are growing less affiliated with religion as they get older. 2. There are more religiously unaffiliated Americans than Catholic Americans or mainline Protestant Americans. 3. Those who are unaffiliated are becoming more secular. 

 

II. I was very surprised to see that there were more unaffiliated people than Catholic or Protestant people. The “religious switching” from Catholicism to another faith could be due to an intense Catholic environment that children may have lived in in the eighties, the generation where there are the most unaffiliated people. I do not think that this decline of people who hold a religion is a bad thing. Hopefully, our religion should not have an effect on societies behavior towards another. I believe that people are becoming more unaffiliated with religion as they begin to look at things with a scientific point of view, where theories are based off of tangible ideas and realism. 

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:23 AM

It is a shame that millennials are declining religion more. Religion is one of the bases of culture. If you take away a base from a house it crumbles. The more we deny our religion, values, and culture in general the more we will become plain, and no longer culturally diverse.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:35 AM

Religion-Christianity in USA

Bradley Blocher's curator insight, April 4, 2017 1:18 PM
This article is related to our AP Human Geography due to the fact religion often plays an important role in the cultural make-up of a country or society. With Christianity declining in America, America will soon have  more problems with trials they may face since faith in God to help us as a nation get through things will no longer be a part of many people.
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Unit 1: Geography as a field of inquiry- Geographers Making a Difference

"Geography is a broad and diverse field, but one thing geographers have in common is using a geographic perspective to have an impact on the world. In this video, a few talk about the many ways that geography helps them to make a difference." 

 

This video is a great demonstration of the diverse and practical applications of geography.  This is a great answer to the oft-asked question, "but what does a geographer DO?"

 

Tags: geography, video, geo-inspiration, AAG, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. This video not only answers why geographers are important, but also what important things do they do. This video is a demonstration about the diverse and practical applications of geography, also explaining the various effects of geography. For example, geography can effect logistics, marketing, sales and government affairs. 

 

II. Although APHUG has immensely elevated my knowledge of geographers roles, this video told me things that geographers do that i was not aware of. For example, geographers doing research on coastal communities with the sea rise due to arctic melting and climate change. Geographers study the environment as well as the human-environment interaction, contrary to common belief that geographers only study land formations and urban patterns. 

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mapsdotcom's curator insight, February 28, 2014 11:48 AM

How can you make a difference with Geography? What does it mean to you?

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Unit One: Major Geographical Concepts based on Location- Your health depends on where you live

Unit One: Major Geographical Concepts based on Location- Your health depends on where you live | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Environment + genetics = risks. If we manage these risks, we will live a healthy life. Pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, methane gas and carbon dioxide can effect lungs and cause cancer. Homes near factories, such as "plantations" can be effected by chemicals released but the factories. Doctors have a hole in their research, as they do not ask about environmental factors. 

 

II. It was very interesting to see the toxic release inventories located in Colorado on a cell phone. I did not know that we could get hold of that information. I believe that if everyone knew how close they actually were to toxic waste facilities, they would immediately move away from their homes for fear of getting a chronic disease. I believe that this reflects the main reason for environmental issues, being that people are not uncaring of the situation, just unaware. 

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Unit Three : Culture - Folk/Pop culture - ‘Ni Boisekoa naiz’: Keeping Basque alive in Idaho | Al Jazeera America

Unit Three : Culture - Folk/Pop culture -        ‘Ni Boisekoa naiz’: Keeping Basque alive in Idaho | Al Jazeera America | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Via Charles Tiayon
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. A family of Basque Americans gather to teach the Spanish language of Basque. With only one million Basque speakers left, the language is very vulnerable to being lost in the midst of popular culture and then growing of new generations. 


II. Folk culture is very important to preserve as it allows a traditional culture’s practices to be shared to other people around the world. With the heavy influence of popular culture, it is very difficult to maintain traditional practices. It is important that a culture does not die out. When a culture is lost, diversity around the world is abandoned and society becomes the same. 

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Unit Five- Agriculture- Biotechnology- How a US company (Monsanto) changed PH corn industry - Manila Standard Today

Unit Five- Agriculture- Biotechnology- How a US company (Monsanto) changed PH corn industry - Manila Standard Today | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Milton Stokes, an American registered dietitian, came to the Philippines last week on a trip organized by US seed producer Monsanto Company to warn about the future when population will most likely increase and arable farms will shrink. 

 

 

 

Stokes, a former writer and restaurateur who now serves as director of global health and nutrition outreach for Monsanto, says the planet will have to feed at least two billion more people by 2050.

“From my perspective, what’s profound and of interest to me is that the population of Earth is growing. By 2050, there will be at least additional 2 billion people on this planet. That is probably a conservative estimate. [More] food has to come from somewhere.  We feed the world on arable land that is about the size of South America.  Nobody wants to bring more land to production. That’s just not gonna happen,” he says in a roundtable briefing with journalists at Dusit Thani Hotel in Makati City.

 

 

Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Milton Stokes, the founder of Monsanto, warned the Philippines about the decrease of resources when population is estimated to increase and farms will shrink. Stokes believes that arable lands will shrink by over one third in the next century. With the population also increasing, Stokes promotes that biotechnology should be used to make or modify products or improve plants, animals or microorganisms. 

 

II. Biotechnology is a biology-based technology which involves using organisms or parts to manipulate another organisms genetic code to have a certain characteristic. Although biotechnology does lead to the production of higher yield crops, it has received much controversy due to health issues and environmental problems surrounding the subject. I believe that biotechnology can be used to increase self sufficiency in developing nations as it allows for a higher production with fewer inputs, where farmers can spend less money to get more crops. 

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 11:25 AM

Monsanto seeds are known for containing GMO's and slowly taking over the seed industry. This frightens me because if companies like Monsanto start taking over with there genetically modified crop there will be no organic crops left.

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Unit Five- Agriculture-Issues in contemporary commercial agriculture

Today’s agriculture has transformed into a high-tech enterprise that most 20th-century farmers might barely recognize.



 

Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Farmers are considering using unmanned air drones to increase their productivity. Air drones can be beneficial to the farms as  machines with GPS receivers are able to recognize their position within a farm field and adjust operation to maximize productivity or efficiency at that location. Drones can be also used by sensor technologies, including machine vision that can detect things like location and size of stalks and leaves to inform their mechanical processes. 

 

II. The development of technology can be beneficial for the environment as heavy machinery leads to soil erosion on fields. Air drones can also be used to spread fertilizer or pesticide. There is much controversy on the use of air drones as there are many legal processes that must be passed of where the drone can be flown. Air drones are also known for interrupting flight patterns and causing fear from people with people associating air drones with war. 

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Nathaniel Pather's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:48 PM

Farming looks much more interesting to me now!

Ben Simpson's curator insight, March 27, 2015 5:21 AM

Drones, Robots and AI are all near future technology that will help and benefit farmers in growing and supplying food and plants. This source goes into great detail on how this will work!

Brock Nicholls's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:40 AM

 Thomasson, A (20 March, 2015). Farmers of the Future will Utilize Drones, Robots and GPS. No-Till Farmer. http://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/4501-farmers-of-the-future-will-utilize-drones-robots-and-gps


This source discusses the benefits of utilizing Robots and Drones for farming purposes making it an easier task for the farmer as s/he won’t have to travel a huge area anymore. Shows insight and history of development through the engines and systems used in agriculture e.g from animal power to combustion engines.




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Unit Two: Population and Migration- Patterns of fertility, mortality, and healt Infant mortality down by 30% in past decade

Unit Two: Population and Migration- Patterns of fertility, mortality, and healt Infant mortality down by 30% in past decade | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it



The wide gap between rural and urban areas in infant death rates continues in India but is declining . Rural IMR in 2012 was 46 infant deaths per 1000 live births while the urban rate was 28. In fact, the rural IMR declined by 30% compared to the urban decline of 28% since 2003.

 

More at Original: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Infant-mortality-down-by-30-in-past-decade/articleshow/24503069.cms


Via nrip
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. Tamil Nadu has halved its infant mortality rate in the past decade while many other states have decreased their mortality rate by 40%. Infant mortality rate is viewed as a key marker of wellbeing administrations, healthful levels, neediness and instructive level of the individuals. 

 

II. In developing countries, infant mortality is caused from a lack of medical attention. Developing countries do not have the technology needed for childbirth, ultrasounds and x-rays in order to perform diagnostics on pregnant women. However, with today’s extensive and better run primary health services, some women can get the attention they need. 

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Unit Five: Agriculture- Global food distribution, malnutrition, and famin ‘Air pollution, malnutrition responsible for persistent TB’

Unit Five: Agriculture- Global food distribution, malnutrition, and famin ‘Air pollution, malnutrition responsible for persistent TB’ | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Air pollution, malnutrition, overcrowding and poor living conditions are responsible for continuing tuberculosis problems in the country, noted the Indian Medical Association. It stated that to put off the chance of
Kristen Trammell's insight:

I. According to the Indian Medical Association, air pollution, malnutrition, overcrowding and overall poor living conditions are leading causes for tuberculosis. One fourth of all tuberculosis cases are in India. Celebrities are raising awareness about this problem in India, hoping to lead to equal drug treatment and care for victims of TB. 

 

II. Malnutrition is one of the leading causes of death in underdeveloped and developing countries. Malnutrition can lead to tuberculosis as one does not get the necessary nutrients in order to help prevent bacteria from entering their system. Developing countries are vulnerable to malnutrition with their high populations, leading to poverty and a lack of access to nutrient rich foods. 

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