AP Human Geo
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Changes in the APHG course


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:31 AM

HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:16 PM

Take a look HUGGERS!

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:29 PM

course info-- 2 AP conferences in the last year and this was not mentioned!

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For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die'

For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die' | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Thousands of Muslims in the Central African Republic have fled as UN chief warns of 'ethno-religious cleansing'.

 

Leave or die.  It's come down to this for the Muslims of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic.  Muslims here once lived freely among the Christian majority, running businesses and praying in mosques. Now, many of the city's Muslims have fled, and on Sunday about 1,300 Muslims from Bangui's PK12 neighbourhood were evacuated to safety by peacekeeping forces.

Already one of the world's poorest countries, CAR has seen a wave of upheaval and violence in the past 15 months. The 10-month reign of the Muslim-dominated Seleka rebel group inflamed intercommunal tensions in the country, and spurred the rise of Christian militias called the anti-Balaka.  Once the Seleka was forced out of power in January, the anti-Balaka rampaged, targeting Muslims across the country for their perceived support of the Seleka and its bloody excesses.


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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 11:24 AM

This article does a good job discussing the ongoing issues in the Central African Republic. Its horrible to see a religious cleansing taking place at this point in time. One would think religious cleansing by the sword has diminished (perhaps it has in historical terms) but it is still very much alive throughout the world. What's interesting is how once religion is mixed with politics it seems bloodshed always ensues. The changing of presidents reflects the changing of "what group" controls the country/region... 

CAR is located within the struggling Sahel region. Yes, there are ecological/environmental issues that plague the Sahel region and the people whom inhabit it but the region also proposes an intense societal issue. This is the region where Arab Africa meets Black Africa, thus two distinct groups of people with two different faiths. Due to conflicts in neighboring countries, as exemplified in the article through Chad, disruption has led to Arab peoples fleeing South. The displacement of these people has led to a growing muslim population in Christian dominated Central African Republic. Once political order is involved there is always one group of people in charge. The changing of societal leaders has now led to a 15 month disruption which has now evolved into a religious ethnic cleansing. 

The Sahel region is only going to get worse. There is an issue with the climate which is affecting both the people and landscape. There is now a clash of cultures/religions. These two issues are ultimately going to clash. Not only will Christians and Arabs kill each other due to political structure and treatment of each others people but perhaps disputes over fertile land, clean water, droughts, etc... will also lead to conflict. This region of the world is in a tough predicament. The clashing of peoples is not going to improve the situation. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:36 PM

The picture is ironic because the one guy in the white tank top is holding up a peace sign and the other is threatening to slit your throat.  Oxymoronic?  I guess you could see it as a V for victory.  Not really sure.  This comes down to an eye for an eye.  The Christians and Muslims will kill each other till one group comes out on top.  I guess historically we learned nothing from the Reformation.  At one point you couldn't be Protestant, then you couldn't be Catholic.  Religious persecution should not be occurring today.  What a waste of human life.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:14 PM

Though the Central African Republic is a country that not many people have heard of, it seems that it suffers from some of the same problems that any other country does. CAR is home to a large Christian population, though there is a Muslim minority present within the country. The past two years have seen a Muslim rebel group called Seleka perpetrate a violent reign throughout the country, which in turn has given rise to opposition Christian groups called the anti-Balaka. After the Seleka were toppled from power, the anti-Balaka took out their fear and frustration on the country's Muslim population for perceived support of the Seleka. The anti-Balaka murdered Muslims brutally and indiscriminately, causing many Muslims in CAR to either flee or come together in enclaves for protection and support. 

 

This kind of religious persecution is unfortunately nothing new. The Jews have experienced religious persecution for thousands of years and Muslims were on the receiving end of some particularly brutal persecution during the Crusades. It seems that regardless of the time or place, religious tensions are always present and one religion or another is always ready to persecute the other for their differences, real or perceived. This is a global pattern, not unique to any one country, region, or culture. It is an unfortunate but telling one, as it highlights the tendency of human beings to be at odds with one another over any differences. The situation in CAR is representative of a larger problem of intolerance that may never seen an end. 

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Women increasingly outpacing men’s higher education participation in many world markets

Women increasingly outpacing men’s higher education participation in many world markets | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

In many parts of the world, more women enroll in higher education than men. Unfortunately, this has not corrected other gender imbalances—women continue to lag behind men in employment, income, business ownership, research, and politics.


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Governments must plan for migration in response to climate change, researchers say

Governments must plan for migration in response to climate change, researchers say | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Governments around the world must be prepared for mass migrations caused by rising global temperatures or face the possibility of calamitous results, say University of Florida scientists on a research team reporting in the Oct.

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EU Migration Alert: Eight migrants die every day trying to reach richer countries, study reveals

EU Migration Alert: Eight migrants die every day trying to reach richer countries, study reveals | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

Research into migrant deaths in Europe shows 22,000 missing, presumed dead, in past 14 years – more than half the global total

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Mapping migration-China and India

Mapping migration-China and India | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Where are the world's biggest Chinese and Indian immigrant communities? MORE Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France, with some to be found in almost every country.

 

The two most populous countries in the world, India and China, are mentioned frequently when teaching population geography.  However, it is typical in the United States to pass over these countries when discussing migration; this graphic shows the diasporas are quite extensive and highly influential. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:59 PM

When I first came across this article I thought it was intriguing but not surprising. Most people fleeing from India and China go somewhere nearby versus somewhere far away. Places like Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia have a high rate of Chinese and Indian migrants, which proves one of Ravenstein's laws.

Clayton and Annie's curator insight, February 12, 2015 10:07 AM

This is showing indias geography. This article is telling you where the most populated parts of India are. Which are most of them live out side of China. The two most populated countrys are India and China. India has a higher people per square mile than China. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:58 AM

Summary- More Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France. Some 22m ethnic Indians are scattered across every continent. Diasporas have been a part of the world for millennia; they are quite extensive and highly influential.The map highlights the world's top 20 destinations for Chinese and Indian migrants

 

Insight- since China and India are the most populous countries of the world, it makes sense that we ask ourselves "well, do people there ever go to other places to find a little bit more of personal space that is so scarce in their home countries?" They actually do. Maybe it is not because they need personal space. Working opportunities and better living conditions might be what drives these people to migrate from their countries.

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

"More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines."

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Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.

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Chinese Government May Drop Compulsory Population Control Policies to Avert Crisis

Chinese Government May Drop Compulsory Population Control Policies to Avert Crisis | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
JG Vibes | You'll never see anything about it in the mainstream, but Eugenics and forced population control is a primary goal for most of the worlds governments, and the ruling class as a whole.

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#BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:44 PM

Eugenics and forced population control is a primary goal for most of the worlds governments, and the ruling class as a whole.

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Beyond 7 Billion

Beyond 7 Billion | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

After remaining stable for most of human history, the world's population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years.

 

The Los Angeles Times has produced an in-depth interactive feature centered around the impact of an increasing global population.  With videos, population clocks, narrated graphics, maps, photos and articles, this is treasure trove of resources for a population geography unit. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 21, 2012 2:34 PM
Great link, thanks!
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Geographers: Occupational Outlook

Geographers: Occupational Outlook | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:18 PM

For those looking to justify the inclusion of geography in the curriculum, wanting to add a geography major at a school or need to justify the existence of geography education to a non-geo-evangelist, this is something to share.  The Bureau of Labor Studies has declared ""Employment of geographers is expected to grow 35 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be fastest in the professional, scientific, and technical services industry."

Sally Egan's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:36 PM

This sounds like a key reason for studying Geography.

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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 


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Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 2014 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:17 AM

This article is highlights what we already know; China is a dominant force in global trade (although the map should be centered on the Pacific to show China's real shipping lanes and interregional connections).  Containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:26 PM

With the rise and fall of human civilizations have come the rise and fall of religions as well. Americans have grown unaware of the  beliefs and teachings of other religions. They do not know the difference between ethnic and universalizing religions. They do not know that Islam is the fastest expanding religion in the world even though Christianity still has the most followers. Unit 3 Culture

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:57 PM

This article shows how religion affects the world around us and its importance in governments. Especially in the middle east (Saudi Arabia), countries often import factors of their major religion into their government. 

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Inferring International and Internal Migration Patterns from Twitter

Inferring International and Internal Migration Patterns from Twitter | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
My QCRI colleagues Kiran Garimella and Ingmar Weber recently co-authored an important study on migration patterns discerned from Twitter. The study was co-authored with  Bogdan State (Stanford)  and lead author Emilio Zagheni (CUNY).
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EU Migration Alert: IOM Releases New Data on Migrant Fatalities Worldwide: Almost 40,000 Since 2000 - International Organization for Migration

EU Migration Alert: IOM Releases New Data on Migrant Fatalities Worldwide: Almost 40,000 Since 2000 - International Organization for Migration | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
Undocumented migrants are not criminals. They are human beings in need of protection and assistance deserving respect http://t.co/uWHmZuUduR
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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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The Plight of China's Favored Sons

The Plight of China's Favored Sons | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it
For China's government, social stability is threatened by a gender imbalance likely to leave up to 40 million Chinese without a wife.

 

There are many results of population policies such as the 'One-Child Policy' in China, which is primarily aimed at reducing population growth. Some on these consequences are unintended; due to parents preferences for male children there is a strong gender imbalance in China which has some serious sociological and cultural implications. For more about Asian society, follow: http://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/2012-watch-out-chinese-bachelors


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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | AP Human Geo | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2