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American Makeover: SPRAWLANTA

"American Makeover is a web series on new urbanism, the antidote to sprawl."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:49 PM

American Makeover only produced two segments in the series, but they are excellent examples that show the planning ethos of new urbanism.  In this episode, they lay out the argument against urban sprawl.  In Episode 2, they show the ideas that guided the planning of Seaside, Florida.  For a map of some of my favorite place based videos, which will include these, click here.     


tags: suburbs, transportation, planning, sprawlurban, land use, unit 7 cities

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 3:54 PM

I have to wonder how far is too far? The houses are much more affordable when they are far outside the city center but, how much more expensive is it to travel so far every day? Between gas prices and hours not at home or work anything you save on a house price gets spent on transportation costs. It is just a transfer of funds.

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How food shapes our cities

How food shapes our cities | geography | Scoop.it
Every day, in a city the size of London, 30 million meals are served. But where does all the food come from? Architect Carolyn Steel discusses the daily miracle of feeding a city, and shows how ancient food routes shaped the modern world.

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Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute

Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute | geography | Scoop.it
Hint: Unless you live in Mongolia, your country's probably on this list.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 21, 2014 6:17 AM

Check out this map and article that indicates that most countries are having some type of border dispute with a neighbor.

Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 21, 2014 6:21 AM

Check out this map and article that shows how most of the world's countries have an issue with a neighbor over its boundaries. S/O to Mongolia and some other landlocked countries...I guess nobody wants you...

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What dialect do you speak? A map of American English

What dialect do you speak? A map of American English | geography | Scoop.it
Do you pahk the cah? Do you eat olycooks? The words you use can identify where you came from.

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The Developing World's Urban Population Could Triple by 2210

The Developing World's Urban Population Could Triple by 2210 | geography | Scoop.it
Can we possibly prepare?

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:46 PM

"It took 10,000 years – a hundred centuries – for the world’s urban population to swell to three and a half billion people, its current level. As scores of headlines have noted, this means that half the world’s population currently lives in urban areas. How much longer will it take to complete this ongoing “urbanization project”?

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Get "Frozen" Again As Elsa Sings "Let It Go" In 25 Languages

Get "Frozen" Again As Elsa Sings "Let It Go" In 25 Languages | geography | Scoop.it

The world can't stop singing "Let It Go," so Disney has released a multilingual version of Frozen's Oscar-nominated hit song — and you can watch it only on BuzzFeed! (Amie!!)


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How religion in the US today tracks closely with geography

How religion in the US today tracks closely with geography | geography | Scoop.it

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 21, 2014 12:20 PM

"Tell me where you live, and there’s a good chance I’ll know your religion.  Mississippi or Alabama? Protestant. Rhode Island or New Jersey? Roman Catholic. Mormon? That’s easy: Utah, although a substantial minority in Idaho is Mormon too. Vermont or Oregon? You could well be "unchurched."

 

Demography isn’t exactly spiritual destiny. But for most Americans, their religious identity tracks closely with where they live."

 

Don't forget to take the "Are you smarter than an atheist quiz"!!

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | geography | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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Girls Kidnapped for Forced Marriage Suffer Rising Crime in India - San Francisco Chronicle

Girls Kidnapped for Forced Marriage Suffer Rising Crime in India - San Francisco Chronicle | geography | Scoop.it
Girls Kidnapped for Forced Marriage Suffer Rising Crime in India
San Francisco Chronicle
Dec.
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Gentrification May Actually Be Boon To Longtime Residents

Gentrification May Actually Be Boon To Longtime Residents | geography | Scoop.it
New studies suggest low-income people are less likely to leave transitioning communities, not more.

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There Are Some Towns That Are So Close To Disappearing From Our Landscape. Here’s One.

There Are Some Towns That Are So Close To Disappearing From Our Landscape. Here’s One. | geography | Scoop.it


This clip is part of a spectacular production called "Hollow" about southwestern West Virginia that is immersive and interactive — you can dive into time periods, unlock more content, hear music and sounds from the town, and really explore this place.


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The Dark Side of Globalization: Why Seattle's 1999 Protesters Were Right

The Dark Side of Globalization: Why Seattle's 1999 Protesters Were Right | geography | Scoop.it
The WTO demonstrators were the "Occupy" movement of the late-20th century—mocked, maligned, and mostly right.

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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


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Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:12 AM

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:54 PM

This is an interesting way to educate people around the world of the places that most people don't think about. its interesting to see the technology with the tribes people to see how it actually benefits their folk culture by preserving the land.

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Fair Trade | Visual.ly

Fair Trade | Visual.ly | geography | Scoop.it
Fair trade is when the original source of the product, such as the farmer get an equal percentage of the profits as the business who carries it gets.

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After Crimea, will Scotland be next to vote on independence?

After Crimea, will Scotland be next to vote on independence? | geography | Scoop.it
Exactly six months from now, Scots will go to the polls to vote on the future of their country, in a referendum on independence.

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | geography | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:06 PM
unit 7
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Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.'

Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.' | geography | Scoop.it
The geography of the snow day, courtesy of Reddit user atrubetskoy

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:44 AM

maps can be really interesting! unit 1

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How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk | geography | Scoop.it
What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer the questions to see your personal dialect map.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:08 PM

This article is the subject of the discussion board this week!  Have fun!

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This Map Shows How The GDP Of US States Compare To Countries Around The World

This Map Shows How The GDP Of US States Compare To Countries Around The World | geography | Scoop.it
The 2012 GDP of the entire United States was about $16.2 trillion.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2014 6:59 AM

The color scheme might be a little hard on the eyes, but the data content in this map is fascinating. 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 9, 2014 10:19 AM

#America!

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Visualizing Race, Identity, and Change | PROOF

Visualizing Race, Identity, and Change | PROOF | geography | Scoop.it

"In many ways race is about difference and how those differences are codified through language, categories, boxes, segmentation, and even the implicit sorting that goes on in our heads in terms of the way we label others and even ourselves. Appearance and identity are most certainly linked..."


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Religion in America’s states and counties, in 6 maps

Religion in America’s states and counties, in 6 maps | geography | Scoop.it
With Christmas right around the corner, now seems as good a time as any to look at the state of religion in America's states and counties.

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Thursday, 9/26 – Palestine and Israel | Mrs. Gehle's AP Human ...

Thursday, 9/26 – Palestine and Israel | Mrs. Gehle's AP Human ... | geography | Scoop.it
Mrs. Gehle's AP Human Geography Class. Menu ... Today we will read this article about the conflict between Palestine and Israel. (Note: Most articles about this topic are written by one side or the other.
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Here's What Happens When You Ask People To Draw A Map Of The USA From Memory

Here's What Happens When You Ask People To Draw A Map Of The USA From Memory | geography | Scoop.it
Well, they tried. (true story. i am the WORST at us geography. http://t.co/uQWSdAkAU0 via @moby_dickhead)

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The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking

The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking | geography | Scoop.it

"One of our colleagues and leaders in spatial thinking in education, Dr. Diana Stuart Sinton, has written a book entitled The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking, along with colleagues Sarah Bednarz, Phil Gersmehl, Robert Kolvoord, and David Uttal.  As the name implies, the book provides an accessible and readable way for students, educators, and even the general public to understand what spatial thinking is and why it matters.  It “help[s] us think across the geographies of our life spaces, physical and social spaces, and intellectual space.”  Dr. Sinton pulls selections from the NRC’s Learning to Think Spatially report and ties them to everyday life.  In so doing, she also provides ways for us in the educational community to think about teaching these concepts and skills in a variety of courses.   Indeed, as she points out, spatial thinking is particularly essential within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as geography."  - See more at: ESRI's GIS Education Community blog. 


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Fran Martin's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:07 AM

Useful for what we mean when we say 'thinking geographically'.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:17 PM

Educação geográfica! 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 7:02 PM

Guía popular de pensamiento espacial.

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What Facebook Tells Us About the Hidden Paths of Mass Migration

What Facebook Tells Us About the Hidden Paths of Mass Migration | geography | Scoop.it
The basic shape of urban growth is easy to spot; we look at the fastest-growing cities, for example, or immigration numbers.

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Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 14, 2014 3:03 PM

This article applies to diffusion and cultural regions. It talks about the migration patterns of those from the same place, moving to the same place. It shows us the pattern of group migration, one that is very important to understanding and easily discovered as to why migration is happening. This also applies to pop culture becuase the device used to create this map is Facebook. Its incredible that a social media site can produce this kind of information. This shows us that new social media sites are improving data and allowing us to explore many new things in human geography.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:51 PM

England is the 10th most popular for mass migration in the world. This map shows us as a society as to where people are escaping from and where people have settled along with the mass regional areas that have been affected by this Migrational chaos.