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Rescooped by Alex Simon from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Development company for Hyperloop emerges from stealth mode | GizMag.com

Development company for Hyperloop emerges from stealth mode | GizMag.com | Anything | Scoop.it
Well, Elon Musk can relax now. Having previously announced his intention to at least build a demonstrator of his Hyperloop transporter for high-speed, high-capacity inter-city transport, he now appears relieved to leave that task to HTT (Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, Inc). HTT is an engineering startup company operating under the wing of California-based JumpStartFund. It has developed basic organization and operational plans, as well as having established key partnerships to help navigate a path to a working Hyperloop.Musk's Hyperloop has gained a vast amount of media attention over the past year or so. His proposal was for a dedicated low-pressure tube train to connect the Los Angeles and San Francisco city centers while reaching top speeds of about 800 mph (1,300 km/h). With a yearly passenger capacity of 15 million passengers, and half-hour transport between the most distant terminals, the Hyperloop made quite a splash as an alternative to open, above-ground high-speed trains.Click headline to erad more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Alex Simon's insight:
Thats really cool, but its problably really expensive to make. But if it does what it says it does, then it would be really modern and inovative.
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Rescooped by Alex Simon from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Attacks On Clean Energy Were A Giant Failure | HuffPost.com

Attacks On Clean Energy Were A Giant Failure | HuffPost.com | Anything | Scoop.it
Efforts to roll back renewable energy standards in the states this year have largely failed despite the best efforts of conservative groups, according to a new report.At least 37 bills have been introduced in 2013 to eliminate or weaken states' renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which set a minimum requirement for how much energy a state's utilities must draw from renewable sources like solar and wind. The new report from ProgressNow and a coalition of national environmental and state-based progressive groups found that only one of those efforts has passed so far this year."They have almost no success," said Brian Wietgrefe, national research director at ProgressNow. "It's because it works -- the policies work."Thirty-seven states have some manner of RPS in place. But a number of conservative groups, including the Heartland Institute and Grover Norquist's Americans for Tax Reform, have been driving efforts to amend or entirely remove those standards.Perhaps the most influential opponent is the American Legislative Exchange Council, the conservative nonprofit that brings together lawmakers and corporate interests to develop model legislation. In October 2012, ALEC's board of directors adopted a model bill that the Heartland Institute wrote, called the Electricity Freedom Act. The bill describes RPS as "essentially a tax on consumers of electricity that forces the use of renewable energy sources beyond what would be called for by real market forces" and calls for their repeal. ALEC's list of advisers includes representatives of a number of energy companies that stand to lose money as renewables gain a bigger share of the market, including Peabody Energy, Koch Industries and Exxon Mobil.Todd Wynn, who until recently headed ALEC's energy, environment and agriculture task force, had promised that 2013 would be "the most active year ever" for efforts to repeal renewable energy mandates. And it was -- but most of those efforts didn't work.ALEC did not immediately respond to The Huffington Post's request for comment.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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