General Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
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Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children

Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Parents with social anxiety disorder are more likely than parents with other forms of anxiety to engage in behaviors that put their children at high risk for developing angst of their own, according to a small study of parent-child pairs.

 

Anxiety is the result of a complex interplay between genes and environment, the researchers say, and while there's not much to be done about one's genetic makeup, controlling external factors can go a long way toward mitigating or preventing anxiety in the offspring of anxious parents.


"Children with an inherited propensity to anxiety do not just become anxious because of their genes, so what we need are ways to prevent the environmental catalysts -- in this case, parental behaviors -- from unlocking the underlying genetic mechanisms responsible for the disease," Ginsburg says.


Via Gina Stepp
Hilary J.'s insight:

The debate regarding whether nurture or nature plays a larger role in mental illness has been ongoing for sometime. Recent research though, has identified that these two factors work with each other and not against each other like previously thought. In regards to anxiety and the development of an anxiety disorder, the researchers of this article note a significant amount of research has found that the children of those with anxiety disorders may have a higher genetic predisposition for developing their own anxiety disorder than the children of those without an anxiety disorder. An additional component that was researched though, was the attitudes and behavioral habits of those parents with anxiety disorders; essentially, the effect that the environment these parents created for their children who already had higher predispositions to developing an anxiety disorder was closely examined. Using factors of parental warmth and affection, this research found that parents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder showed less warmth and affection towards their children, criticized them more often and expressed doubts about their child's ability to perform a task. Learning about genetic and environmental components and the implications they may have on the prevention of anxiety, particularly in childhood, is of utmost importance. Anxiety disorders often go unrecognized in childhood. Because of the likely delays in diagnosis and treatment, the child may be at higher risk for depression and poor academic performance not only in childhood, but into their adult years as well. 

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Loran Northey's curator insight, March 9, 2014 1:35 PM

Children model behaviour and if the behaviour they continually witness is worry, fear and anxiety then that unfortunately is what they will learn to do to. 

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Anxiety Quotes: The Ten Best Quotes About Overcoming Anxiety

Anxiety Quotes: The Ten Best Quotes About Overcoming Anxiety | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Quotes about anxiety that have validity.

 

These famous anxiety quotes encapsulate the principles of two leading psychological therapies for overcoming anxiety - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).


Via Ariana Amorim
Hilary J.'s insight:

While this article isn't based in science, it is an excellent source of personal affirmations those suffering from general anxiety disorder can use. Using affirmations can be helpful as one of several techniques or interventions to combat excessive anxiety. An affirmation is a true thought, or quote repeated out loud to yourself in moments when you are feeling particularly triggered to engage in a behavior or unhealthy thought process. By repeating this statement over and over to yourself, you are actively focusing on a positive outcome rather than the negative situation. For example, someone experiencing an excessive amount of anxiety may refer to one of the quotes in this article i.e. "(Slow breathing) is like an anchor in the midst of an emotional storm: the anchor won't make the storm goes away, but it will hold you steady until it passes." - Russ Harris. An individual may repeat this out loud to themselves in an attempt to bring themselves back to the present moment and re-focus their thought process in a more productive way.

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Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons

Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Distraction is an effective pain reliever, and a new study concludes that listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons who can easily become absorbed in cognitive activities.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Hilary J.'s insight:

While the research in this article dealt primarily with pain control, an unexpected outcome regarding anxiety patients was found. Distraction is a common tool used to reduce pain in post-surgical and pain-control patients. Essentially, it is the act of redirecting an individual's thoughts into something else other than the pain they are currently feeling. It was found that those patients who had high anxiety in addition to pain control issues were the most responsive to distraction and cognitive redirection. In this way, the researchers initial hypothesis that those with high anxiety would be unable to be redirected was contradicted. This research has important implications in the way that anxiety can be treated. Teaching clients who are suffering from anxiety cognitive redirection and distracting techniques that allow them to be more mindful, such as listening to music, may assist in decreasing their level of anxiety when other interventions are unavailable. 

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What Anxiety Does to Your Brain and What You Can Do About It

What Anxiety Does to Your Brain and What You Can Do About It | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
We all deal with anxiety in some form or another, whether it's when you're pulled over by the cops or about to give a speech in front of a crowd. But for some, anxiety is a much stronger, more fearsome force--one that never goes away.

Via Ken Morrison
Hilary J.'s insight:

This article gives an excellent overview of what anxiety is and what is going on in the human brain when anxious feelings arise. The important distinction between stress and anxiety is discussed, mainly that stress usually comes from external sources and deals with immediate problems while anxiety is usually stimulated by an internal response and deals with potential problems or fear of future problems. Simply feeling anxious can turn into an anxiety disorder when that feeling is constant, overwhelming, and interrupts daily function. Those who are in the midst of anxiety often have symptoms of increased heart rate, restlessness, and a feeling of being keyed up or tense. These symptoms arise from the brain's fight or flight response to a perceived threat. Anxiety disorders can occur when the individual is unable to break free from this state of fight or flight. The article continues on to discuss interventions and techniques to lessen an individual's anxiety such as mediation and relaxation techniques, writing in a journal, and talking to a health professional including both a medical doctor and mental health specialist. 

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Transcendental Meditation an effective way to ease anxiety!

Transcendental Meditation an effective way to ease anxiety! | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it

Scientific research indicates that the Transcendental Meditation (TM) is more effective than standard treatments such as psychotherapy and relaxation techniques in beating trait anxiety, especially in people with the highest levels of stress.


Via themedguru
Hilary J.'s insight:

Transcendental Meditation (TM) refers to the mental repetition of a mantra that is meant to calm overactive thoughts and allow an individual to experience a deeper level of consciousness and relaxation which can lead to a more genuine feeling of happiness and vitality. This research study compared individuals who utilized TM consistently to those that didn't and the consequent effect this technique had on their anxiety. It was found that those who used TM experienced a drastic decrease in their anxiety symptoms. Not only did their anxiety symptoms decrease, but this decrease proved to be long-term. Additionally, research also showed that using TM was able to lower high blood pressure, improve sleeping patterns, and help combat family issues, emotional numbing, and employment difficulties, all of which are relevant factors in anxiety disorders. While only one type of meditation was researched in this study (TM), it could be useful for practitioners treating anxiety disorders and for their clients to research other possible forms of meditation that best suit the client's needs. 

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themedguru's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:28 AM
Transcendental Meditation an effective way to ease anxiety! http://bit.ly/1i7HxYD
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Cognitive behavioral therapy alleviates health anxiety

Cognitive behavioral therapy alleviates health anxiety | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Health anxiety, medically known as hypochondria, can be debilitating. The obsessive and neurotic worrying about health usually causes distress and affects the ability to function properly.

Via themedguru
Hilary J.'s insight:

Health Anxiety (hypochondria) is a form of focused anxiety where the individual holds the belief of having a myriad of medical illnesses when they, in reality, do not. It is also the fear of developing an illness. This anxiety can actually fuel physical symptoms - a cycle of believing one has symptoms, leads to physically feeling these symptoms (ex. chest pain, headaches, etc.), which reinforces the belief that something is truly wrong in their bodies. Usually a doctor's reassurance that nothing is medically wrong is ineffective at relieving the individual's anxiety. This research has found that CBT provides a long-term benefit in treating health anxiety. Patients with severe health anxiety were assigned to either a CBT intervention group led by Non-CBT experts that had undergone a two week training course, or to a standard care group that consisted of reassurance from their medical physician. Those in the CBT intervention reported decreased anxiety, depression and increase in social functioning. These results were maintained long-term. Because certain CBT interventions can be taught to other professionals such as nurses and medical doctors, it is possible that, with training, these professionals can help recognize and combat anxiety in a more cost-effective way. 

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themedguru's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:03 AM
Cognitive behavioral therapy alleviates health anxiety http://bit.ly/1d9AkJB
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What Are Anxiety Disorders?

What Are Anxiety Disorders? | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
What Are Anxiety Disorders? is a very detailed infographic from Global Medical Education to help people understand the history, issues and treatments of anxiety disorders.
Anxiety disorders are the commonest psychiatric illnesses globally.

Via George Huba
Hilary J.'s insight:

This article, or info-graphic is packed with all the basic information that clients suffering from an anxiety disorder may want to know. Using this as a teaching aid for clients can be helpful in that the information is basic, and presented in an easy to understand manner. Additionally, the use of celebrities and popular personalities as examples of those who suffer from anxiety and lead successful lives can be particularly useful for clients. Often times, clients with anxiety can feel isolated, and unable to function. Viewing people who have overcome anxiety and learned to live with it in a healthy, effective manner may give the client increased hope that they also may be able to overcome their anxiety and the complications it has brought to their lives. 

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Victims Of Bullying At Increased Risk Of Anxiety Disorders And Depression Later On

Victims Of Bullying At Increased Risk Of Anxiety Disorders And Depression Later On | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it

Victims of bullying as children are more likely to develop anxiety disorders and suffer from depression in adulthood, according to a study in JAMA Psychiatry.


Via Luis Valdes
Hilary J.'s insight:

This study discusses the relationship between anxiety disorders (as well as depression) and bullying. Specifically, those who are bullied during their youth show an increased risk at developing anxiety disorders, whereas the bullies themselves have an increased risk in developing depression, as well as antisocial personality disorder. This study highlights the social aspects of the development of anxiety disorders. Because bullies are found everywhere, whether in youth or as an adult, these issues can be ongoing. It makes you wonder if we could somehow decrease the amount of bullying that occurs, and learn to accept people for who they are, where they are at, would we see a decrease in mental illness? Overall, this is a topic that I believe deserves further research, and that research, as well as action, couldn't come soon enough. 

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Finals stress? Sign up for some dog therapy!

Finals stress? Sign up for some dog therapy! | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it

[photo via usfpaws]

 

"If you're feeling anxious about that science exam, or perhaps you are just looking for another reason to distract yourself and procrastinate, head down to Gleeson Library at USF on Monday, and sign up for a session with a pup who is trained specifically to ease your worries.

 

During the "therapy sessions," students will get to pet, play, study with, or just chillax with the pooch, giving their cluttered minds a reprieve. And yes, the dogs do tricks."

 

[via SFWeekly]


Via University of San Francisco
Hilary J.'s insight:

Stress is a reality in everyone's lives and does indeed serve an evolutionary purpose. Stress and anxiety causes an individual to be alert to the presence of real and perceived threats. The threat of failing in school can indeed alert an individual and cause a physical response. However, when that stress and anxiety become uncontrolled, and begin to wreak havoc in the form of debilitating symptoms, anxiety disorders are developed. While school stress and performance anxiety are very real issues for many people, certain interventions and techniques are being used to combat this problem. In the article above, the use of dogs to decrease anxiety is examined. Playing with dogs, while doesn't help a student learn, can decrease their anxiety regarding school and upcoming examinations. The decrease in anxiety in the long run, can actually aid in a positive outcome in academic functioning. Using pets, particularly dogs, as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorders may need more research but may prove to be a valuable tool in treating symptoms of anxiety. 

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Cognitive behaviour therapy improves quality of life in children with asthma and anxiety

Cognitive behaviour therapy improves quality of life in children with asthma and anxiety | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it

Researchers have found that a programme of cognitive behaviour therapy delivered by nurses to children who had asthma and anxiety improved the children's quality of life scores and reduced the risk of escalation of treatment.

 

Levels of anxiety and hyperventilation in children with asthma fell and their quality of life improved after a course of behaviour therapy from a nurse-led clinic, research has found.

 

The therapy included techniques such as mindfulness, where children were encouraged to concentrate on the present moment, rather than worry about what might happen or what has happened before.

 

Basic cognitive restructuring was also used, which involved looking at recurring detrimental thoughts or anxieties experienced by the children and encouraging them to replace them with more positive thoughts. Some of the thoughts children said might increase their anxiety were: 'I don't like people watching me take my inhaler' and 'the ambulance might not come in time'.

 

Writing in the journal Nursing Children and Young People, the researchers said early identification of the role of anxiety in asthma could prevent unnecessary escalation of treatment, for example overuse of oral steroids, which has side effects.


Via Gina Stepp
Hilary J.'s insight:

The relationship between certain chronic illnesses and increases in anxiety is most evident in young children and adolescents. This young population may not have the life experience or coping mechanisms learned in adulthood to deal with the increase in stress that comes with medical illnesses. In this study, nurses in a hospital used cognitive behavioral techniques to help combat the anxiety that many children with asthma face. These children fear using their inhaler in front of their peers, or worry that the ambulance will not come in time. Nurses given training in CBT used techniques such as mindfulness to help children focus on the present moment and not on what could happen. Additionally, cognitive restructuring was used to replace negative thoughts with positive ones. When nurses and caregivers were able to identify anxiety early in these children, asthma attacks were more often avoided and as such, the use of steroids to control their breathing was decreased resulting in more positive health outcomes. 

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Mental illness: Early-life depression and anxiety changes structure of developing brain

New research identifies the brain chemicals and circuits involved in mental illnesses like schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety, giving potential new directions to their treatment.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Hilary J.'s insight:

The field of research on brain chemistry and mental illness is still young, though the research that has been done is promising. This new field is allowing clinicians to develop different and more effective treatments for several mental illnesses. Specifically, research on childhood anxiety and brain structure has shown that anxiety experienced in childhood may change the way that the amygdala connects to other regions of the brain. The amygdala plays a role in emotion regulation and is considered to be part of the limbic system. This finding can possibly explain how early life stresses contribute to future emotional and behavioral issues. If anxiety can be traced back to childhood, then treatment interventions as an adult may be different then if anxiety wasn't experienced in childhood.

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Rethinking Anxiety

Rethinking Anxiety | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it

People living in first-world, industrialized cultures are experiencing alarming rates of anxiety disorder. According to the National Institute of Health, approximately 40 million people per year in the US will succumb to this horrific malaise.

 

Hilary J.'s insight:

Anxiety disorders are on the rise, especially in western industrialized countries. It is reaching epidemic proportions that threaten the mental health of many in our society. Currently, the most popular approach is medication, followed by psychotherapy, or a combination of both. While medication is helpful, and can serve as a way to relieve debilitating symptoms quickly, it is not a long-term solution and can in fact increase the individual's risk of developing an addiction to the prescribed anti-anxiety medication. The medication approach, while useful initially, does not address the underlying causes of anxiety in the individual. Anxiety can sometimes be viewed as more of a symptom of something else, something deeper, that is occurring in the individual's life. When medication is used with no other intervention, the anxious individual is not cured, rather they receive the message that the feelings and thoughts that are occurring in their minds are 'bad' or 'wrong' and need to be avoided. Using only medication to treat anxiety is similar to putting a bandaid on a 12 inch laceration. It does not lend to long-term results. Instead of viewing anxiety as a mental illness that requires medication only, a healthier and more effective approach may be to see it as a disturbance in thought process that may take time to overcome and cannot, nor should not, be simply suppressed. 

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Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children

Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Parents with social anxiety disorder are more likely than parents with other forms of anxiety to engage in behaviors that put their children at high risk for developing angst of their own, according to a small study of parent-child pairs.

 

Anxiety is the result of a complex interplay between genes and environment, the researchers say, and while there's not much to be done about one's genetic makeup, controlling external factors can go a long way toward mitigating or preventing anxiety in the offspring of anxious parents.


"Children with an inherited propensity to anxiety do not just become anxious because of their genes, so what we need are ways to prevent the environmental catalysts -- in this case, parental behaviors -- from unlocking the underlying genetic mechanisms responsible for the disease," Ginsburg says.


Via Gina Stepp
Hilary J.'s insight:

The debate regarding whether nurture or nature plays a larger role in mental illness has been ongoing for sometime. Recent research though, has identified that these two factors work with each other and not against each other like previously thought. In regards to anxiety and the development of an anxiety disorder, the researchers of this article note a significant amount of research has found that the children of those with anxiety disorders may have a higher genetic predisposition for developing their own anxiety disorder than the children of those without an anxiety disorder. An additional component that was researched though, was the attitudes and behavioral habits of those parents with anxiety disorders; essentially, the effect that the environment these parents created for their children who already had higher predispositions to developing an anxiety disorder was closely examined. Using factors of parental warmth and affection, this research found that parents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder showed less warmth and affection towards their children, criticized them more often and expressed doubts about their child's ability to perform a task. Learning about genetic and environmental components and the implications they may have on the prevention of anxiety, particularly in childhood, is of utmost importance. Anxiety disorders often go unrecognized in childhood. Because of the likely delays in diagnosis and treatment, the child may be at higher risk for depression and poor academic performance not only in childhood, but into their adult years as well. 

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Loran Northey's curator insight, March 9, 2014 1:35 PM

Children model behaviour and if the behaviour they continually witness is worry, fear and anxiety then that unfortunately is what they will learn to do to. 

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Study finds treatment for anxiety disorders among children and young adults ... - Scope (blog)

Study finds treatment for anxiety disorders among children and young adults ... - Scope (blog) | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Scope (blog)
Study finds treatment for anxiety disorders among children and young adults ...

Via ESCAP Online
Hilary J.'s insight:

Mental illnesses are difficult to treat, and anxiety disorders are no exception. This study examines the efficacy of current treatments being used to treat adolescent and young adult populations. These treatments include medication, cognitive behavioral therapy or a combination of both. While nearly half (47%) reported being anxiety free at a six year follow up, the other half of participants still felt significant anxiety in their life. This study underscores the potentially life-long nature of psychiatric illnesses. It also serves as a good reminder to clinicians that even though a client may show a good response to treatment initially, it doesn't mean that further treatment and continuing treatment isn't necessary. As clinicians, it is important to be on guard and diligent in maintaining current knowledge regarding treatment of mental illnesses.

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Embracing Uncertainty: Spiritual Lessons from Anxiety Disorders - Waking Times « Waking Times

Embracing Uncertainty: Spiritual Lessons from Anxiety Disorders - Waking Times « Waking Times | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
Embracing Uncertainty: Spiritual Lessons from Anxiety Disorders

Via Lilly Calandrello
Hilary J.'s insight:

The topic of spirituality and higher powers is usually most associated with addictions in the field of mental illness. However, they may also play an important role in coping with anxiety disorders. This article takes the approach that in order to overcome anxiety, an individual must embrace uncertainty. By embracing uncertainty and handing over your concerns and fears for the future over to a higher power, in this case the universe, you are detaching yourself from any expectations or specific outcomes. It is proposed that when an individual suffering from anxiety is able to let go of their fears and uncertainty to a higher power, they are able to embrace a happier, more fulfilled sense of being, therefore relieving themselves of the symptoms that have been plaguing their lives. 

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A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO MEDITATION AND MINDFULNESS IN 6 STEPS

A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO MEDITATION AND MINDFULNESS IN 6 STEPS | General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) | Scoop.it
The idea of meditation can seem a bit intimidating.

Via Dr Sarah Allen
Hilary J.'s insight:

Meditation and mindfulness have been shown to be effective interventions in combatting the debilitating effects of general anxiety disorder and other anxiety disorders. While this practice allows an individual to focus on the present moment and calm their thoughts, and by extension, their bodies, some have reported that they don't know how or feel foolish doing so. This article offers a simple, yet effective guide to those who are attempting meditation for the first time. This guide may be a helpful resource to clients who have a difficult time remembering everything that was covered in therapy and/or want additional education.

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Dr Sarah Allen's curator insight, November 17, 2013 7:38 PM

Meditation gives our brains a break and resets our emotional reactivity. If 20 mins seems too daunting, start with trying it for one minute.