Antigua China
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Antigua China
Investigación sobre la Antigua China.
Curated by Noel Ruiz
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Interpreting Ancient Chinese Fashion - Day 7

Two San Francisco fashion designers—Colleen Quen and Jude Gabbard— seek new inspiration by visiting China for the first time. They skip cosmopolitan Shanghai...
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Interpreting Ancient Chinese Fashion - Day 9 - back in SF

Two San Francisco fashion designers—Colleen Quen and Jude Gabbard— seek new inspiration by visiting China for the first time. They skip cosmopolitan Shanghai...
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Vestimenta China Tradicional Antigua de Emperador.

Vestimenta China Tradicional Antigua de Emperador. | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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Emperador Qianglong con traje de corte.

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Vestimenta Antigua China

Vestimenta Antigua China | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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In Wenchang County of Hainan Province in southern China, a famous hometown of overseas Chinese, there has always been a custom to wear wooden sandals. 

Although the wooden sandals are in the danger of being gradually eliminated, to be replaced by cloth shoes, leather shoes or plastic shoes, yet you can still see many people wearing wooden sandals, whether in countryside or town.

Muji is a general term for shoes of wooden treads. Legend has it that in the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476BC), Jie Zitui, a nobleman of the Jin Kingdom, once got exiled together with the Jin King, Jin Wengong, to another kingdom. After his return, Jie Zitui lived in seclusion in Mianshang Mountain (now southeast of Gongxiu County, Shangxi Province), and declined Jin Wengong's repeated invitations. Later, the military people ordered by the king to summon Jie Zitui attempted to force him out by burning the mountain where he lived, but Jie Zitui died holding a tree. Jin Wengong lamented Jie Zitui so much that he used wood of this tree to make Muji, and whenever he put them on, he would think of Jie Zitui.

Wenchang Muji has a centuries-old history. At first, its shape was very similar to a tiny wooden stool and the upper was added onto it. Since only a small area of Wenchang Muji contacts the ground, they are suitable for walking on muddy road or in rainy days, and it is not easy for people to slip down.      

Afterwards, Muji carved out of a whole piece of wood appeared. Such Mujis have more advantages.

There are many sorts of Wenchang Muji: Kulian (chinaberry) Muji, Kuchang Muji, Jiangfu muji, etc. Especially, the Muji made of chinaberry and painted with beautiful pictures is so wonderful to wear, as chinaberry is both light and durable.

Along with Sino-foreign cultural exchanges, Muji has spread to Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia, and even today it is still popular there.

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Noel Ruiz's comment, February 28, 2013 11:07 PM
Zapatos hechos de madera tradicionales de la provincia sur de china.
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Vestimenta China Antigua

Vestimenta China Antigua | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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Vestimenta Hanfu.

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BoletinMar2008.pdf

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Documento pdf sobre la vestimenta en china, en sus dinastías y minorías étnicas.

 

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Arquitectura China Antigua

Arquitectura China Antigua | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

Imagen de la Ciudad Prohibida de Pekin.  Es una de las arquitecturas más importantes de China.

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Internal Architectural Characteristics

Internal Architectural Characteristics | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

Ancient Chinese architecture, like a silent cultural language, bears rich cultural symbols that reveal Chinese beliefs in life and society. For instance, houses belonging to people of higher social status will definitely have different types of roofs, steles, and couplets, compared with those of lower-status people. IntroversionUnlike many foreign buildings, which attach much importance to external appearance, some Chinese ancient buildings are simple externally but enjoy internal richness. Two typical examples are the Chinese Quadrangle (Siheyuan) and Gardens in Suzhou of East China's Jiangsu Province . Super-StabilityAncient Chinese architecture has remained almost unchanged over thousands of years due to a long history of feudal society in which people embraced similar values and lifestyles.

When appraising ancient Chinese architecture, instead of jumping into mere favorable or unfavorable comments, one should never neglect the fact that the architecture have weathered the storms of time and survived till today. Therefore, critics should be objective by taking historical situations into consideration when making comments.

 InterdependenceThe most influential idea in Book of Changes is that everything in the world is interdependent and one can never learn anything without placing it into a more general environment; Ancient Chinese architecture is no exception.

For instance, the reason why ancient Chinese buildings are made of wood rather than stones lays in the Chinese belief that wood symbolizes spring, green, and new life and therefore is used to build houses for the living. Stones, however, are usually used for mausoleums and graves. 

What's more, the Eight Diagrams (Bagua, relating to divination), the Yin-Yang Principle (concerning opposing elements), and Feng Shui (dealing with attracting positive energy) all have exerted great influences on ancient Chinese architecture.

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La arquitectura china antigua, un arte de madera y ladrillos

La arquitectura china antigua, un arte de madera y ladrillos | Antigua China | Scoop.it
La arquitectura china es bien característica y es la cuna de muchos otros estilos de construcción en oriente que la han tomado como ejemplo a seguir. C
Noel Ruiz's insight:

 la Arquitectura Antigua China refleja el respeto hacia la naturaleza.

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Dragones Chinos

Trabajo Práctico de la materia "Introducción a la cultura China, chino - mandarín" (UADE)

Via Wildalis Sosa
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Wildalis Sosa's comment, February 25, 2013 9:59 PM
Gracias Noel!!! Así mismito es, es una presentación sumamente completa y bien detallada.
Wildalis Sosa's curator insight, February 25, 2013 10:11 PM

Impresionante presentación sobre los dragones de china, sus orígenes, características, mitos y diferencias entre si. muy buen trabajo, con buenos fundamentos  y detallado.

 

Astrid M. Torres Caamaño's curator insight, March 15, 2013 1:50 PM

Muy buena presentación que no tan solo habla del dragón chino, sino que también menciona las diferencias entre este y el dragón japonés y coreano.

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Ancient Chinese Architecture

For higher resolution watch http://www.ntdtv.com / to watch more on youtube : http://youtube.


Via Ting
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Video sobre Arquitectura china de edificios antiguos, estatuas y puentes. 

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Dragón chino

Dragón chino | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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Pintura a mano en papel de arroz por Deng Wei Wei.

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Dragons in Ancient China

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Dragones en la antigua china.  Interesante información sobre la mitología de los dragones en china.

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Interpreting Ancient Chinese Fashion - Day 8 pm

Two San Francisco fashion designers—Colleen Quen and Jude Gabbard— seek new inspiration by visiting China for the first time. They skip cosmopolitan Shanghai...
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Interpreting Ancient Chinese Fashion - Day 10 Final Show

Two San Francisco fashion designers—Colleen Quen and Jude Gabbard— seek new inspiration by visiting China for the first time. They skip cosmopolitan Shanghai...
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Vestuario tradicional chino: Secretos de los mantos del dragón | lagranepoca.com

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Vestimenta Antigua China

Vestimenta Antigua China | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

The ancient Chinese clothing consisted mostly of robes. While the women wore lengthy tunics that reached the ground, the men wore tunics that reached their knees. The sleeves of the garments were wide, and loose fitting, with sashes being added as ornamentation. Darker shades were preferred over light ones. Lighter coloured clothing was worn more commonly by the common people. The original ancient Chinese clothing was referred to as the Han Chinese clothing. The outfit was called the Hanfu. With the coming of various dynasties, the hanfu underwent a lot of modifications.

Primarily, there were three variations of ancient Chinese garments

PIEN-FU: A 2 piece ceremonial costume, consisting of a tunic top extending to the knees, and worn with ankle length skirt or trousers.

CH'ANG P'AO: This is a one-piece ankle length tunic dress.

SHENYI: A combination of the first two, a shenyi is a 2 piece top and trouser/skirt outfit that has been sewn together to make a one-piece garment.

The earliest dynasty recorded, the Shang Dynasty (c.1600 BC-1000 BC), developed the fundamentals of the Hanfu; it was made up of a knee-length tunic tied with a sash, with narrow cuffs called yi, a narrow, ankle-length skirt, called shang. This was accompanied by a bixi, which was a length of fabric that reached the knees. Since technology was limited, the only colours that could be used were primary colors- red, blue , yellow and green. It was a unisex outfit worn by men and women alike. The higher strata of society of course had more elaborate work and motifs on it in spite of the limited colors available.

The following dynasty, the Western Zhou Dynasty managed to enforce a social system in the ancient Chinese clothing. This was displayed by the complexity in their outfits. The higher the rank, more flamboyant and ornate their attire. This included the length of a skirt, the wideness of a sleeve and the degree of ornamentation. Further, the Hanfu became looser. The sleeves were wider and the yi was fastened with a sash which was adorned with jade ornaments. Since left-handedness was looked down upon, the yi was essentially draped in a style known as jiaoling youren, or wrapping the right side over before the left. The shenyi came into force under the Eastern Zhou Dynasty. It is a kind of a combination of a tunic and skirt where the upper and lower halves were cut separately but sewn into one piece. Another additional modification was that left end of the dress was reshaped into a kind of border which could be fastened in front on the chest. This modified dress was quickly adapted.

In the ancient Chinese Clothing most of the traditional designs were unisex uncomplicatedly cut. However, as the dynasties changed, gender specificity came into the shenyi. The men typically wore pants and women, skirts. Each dynasty had their own styles of Hanfu as they evolved.

During the winter months in the ancient China, to keep them warm, people wore padded jackets over the tunics. Though it is considered very common in China, yet silk, as a fabric was restricted to the rich. The poor wore hemp or ramie.

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Vestimenta de Antigua China.

Vestimenta de Antigua China. | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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Twelve-Symbol Dragon Robe (longpao), circa 1880 (Qing Dynasty),  Silk and metallic foil-wrapped yarn in tapestry weave (kesi). Vestimenta tradicional.

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Garden Architectures

Garden Architectures | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

One of outstanding characteristics of Chinese garden architectures is taking advantage of the environment so that the natural scenes and human interest could be merged. The classic garden architectures are often embellished with calligraphy of poems and with paintings. They shun symmetry along an axis and adopt an irregular and complicated layout with plenty of large and small spaces. The appearance of a garden building should be aesthetic and expressive, and enhance the beauty of the surroundings. In its details, exquisite decorative means should be made use of, such as pretty guardrails, patterned windows, grilles, etc. A garden building is a place for viewing the scenery within or beyond the garden and is a key point of the garden. So both the direction of the building and the positions of its doors and windows should take into consideration the viewing angles and the routes.

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Noel Ruiz's comment, February 26, 2013 10:11 PM
Arquitectura junto a la naturaleza.
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External Architectural Features

External Architectural Features | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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Flexibility

Configurations and functions of ancient Chinese architecture, if necessary, can be easily changed, and rooms within them are easy to be dismantled, rebuilt, or shifted for other uses. China's architecture focus particularly on the beauty of group combination, and often adopts a central-axis, symmetric compact composition method. But some types, such as gardens, certain mountain forest Taoist temples and certain residences adopt the method of free combination. The focus is paid to the pursuit of neutral, easy, reserved and deep esthetic characters, giving expressions to the esthetic habits of the Chinese nation.

Unique Structure

Chinese architecture constitutes the only system based mainly on wooden structures of unique charming appearance which differs from all other architectural systems in the world which are based mainly on brick and stone structures. A structure not only has its engineering and technical significance, but the structural and decorative beauty manifested in its resourceful and ingenious combination are themselves part of the architectural beauty.

 

In the case of a wooden structural system, in particular, its complexity and delicacy are unmatched by brick and stone structures, and therefore demonstrate the wisdom of the Chinese. Further processing of the frame members of organic structures and other affiliated frame units forms unique Chinese constructional decoration, including interior and exterior decoration, color painting, wooden, brick and stone sculptures and color glaze, all of which contain very rich techniques and a vivid development process.

 

Symbolized Decoration

Chinese architecture prefers to use the symbolized decoration on the surface of the building. The most frequent used standards are dragon and phoenix. The dragon and the phoenix are the principal motifs for decorative designs on buildings, clothing and articles of daily use in the imperial palace. The throne hall is supported by columns entwined by gilded dragons, the central ramps on marble steps were paved with huge slabs carved in relief with the dragon and phoenix, and the screen walls display dragons in brilliant colors.

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Noel Ruiz's comment, February 26, 2013 9:51 PM
Características que diferencian la arquitectura china con la de las demás. Una arquitectura que su material principal es madera no piedra ni ladrillo.
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Palace (Gong) Chinease Architecture

Palace (Gong) Chinease Architecture | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

The Chinese word for "palace" is Gong. The Forbidden City of Beijing, which still stands intact and which served as the imperial palace for both Ming and Qing emperors (1368-1911) covers an area of 720,000 square meters and embraces many halls, towers, pavilions and studies measured as 9,900 bays. It is one of the greatest palaces of the world. In short, palaces grew into a veritable city and are often called Gongcheng (palace city).

Apart from the palace, other abodes of the emperor are also called Gong. The Yiheynan Park used to be the Summer Palace. Then there is another type of Gong called Zhaigong, where the emperor prepared himself abstinence before he offered sacrifice at grand ceremonies. There is one such Zhaigong on the grounds of Beijing's Temple of Heaven.

Inside a great number of Gongs, certain individual buildings may also be called Gong. The Qing emperors used to live at Qianqinggong (Palace of Heavenly Purity) in the Forbidden City, whereas the living quarters of the empresses were at Kunninggong (Palace of Female Tranquility). The imperial concubines of various ranks inhabited the six Gongs or palace quadrangles on either side of the central axis of the Forbidden City.

The name Gong is also used for religious buildings of great dimensions. The Potala in Lhasa is a Gong to the Chinese; the lame temple of Beijing is Yonghegong. The temples of Taoist priests are generally called Sanginggong (palace of triple purity).

For thousands of years, the word Gong was reserved exclusively for naming imperial and religious buildings. With the passage of time and political changes, many of the old Gongs have been opened to the general public for sightseeing. Furthermore, a number of buildings have been named Gong or palace. For instance, Taimiao of the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing has been renamed the "Working People's Palace of Culture". Similar Gongs or palaces have been built in many cities of the country for the cultural, scientific and recreational activities respectively for workers and children.

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Development of Chinese Ancient Architecture

Development of Chinese Ancient Architecture | Antigua China | Scoop.it
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In the Paleolithic Age, men lived on fishery and hunting, and were sheltered in trees and caves. In the Neolithic Age, men engaged in raising animals and farming, and settled down by digging caves and by building simple houses with twigs and lumber, thus commencing their architectural activities.

 

During the 3,000 years of the feudalist society, Chinese ancient architecture formulated gradually its unique system, coupled with a considerable progress in urban planning, garden designing, and house construction technique. In 221 B.C., the First Emperor of the Qin Empire mobilized the resources of the country to do construction works on a massive scale, including A'Fang Palace, the Emperor's Mausoleum, the Great Wall and the Dujiangyan Water-Conservancy Project. From then on, many more massive construction works of lasting fame were carried out in the history of China.

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Chinese Architecture

Chinese Architecture | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:
Información sobre la arquitectura china antigua y sobre la arquitectura de la ciudad prohibida.
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Diferentes mitos sobre el origen de los Dragones Chinos.

Diferentes mitos sobre el origen de los Dragones Chinos. | Antigua China | Scoop.it
Noel Ruiz's insight:

Algunos mitógrafos cuentan que los dragones son percibidos a través de ciertos tótems de antiguas tribus Chinas.
Varios de éstos presumen que el dragón surge de una desfiguración o mutación de reptiles acuáticos, como serpientes o cocodrilos. Es así que, citando un ejemplo, en la cultura Tanshao existe una criatura alargada tipo serpiente-pez. La asociación de esta figura con el dragón se basa en la leyenda de una trucha que debe saltar sobre un mítico arco llamado “el arco del dragón” para que ésta pueda convertirse en uno.
En la dinastía Han, el dragón es representado con cuerpo de culebra, escamas de pez, cuernos de ciervo, cara de camello, dos pares de talones de águila, orejas de toro, patas de tigre y ojos de demonio; y según algunas versiones, bajo su barbilla mantiene una perla flameante.
Existe otra versión sobre los orígenes que es relatada por He Xin, donde se dice que el dragón proviene de una especie de cocodrilo. Como este animal es sensible a los cambios atmosféricos y prevé la llegada de la lluvia, se le atribuyó el control sobre el clima.
Otros investigadores han sacado la conclusión de que el dragón chino nace como resultado de la mezcla de totems de varias tribus cuando éstas, por necesidad de supervivencia, se unieron para vivir juntas.
Las versiones modernas de los dragones chinos les atribuyen poderes sobrenaturales, como por ejemplo el decir que pueden crecer tanto como para cubrir el cielo entero. Pueden volar sobre las nubes ó esconderse debajo del agua. Según los Shuowen Jiezi, los dragones pueden crear las nubes, evocar el fuego y el agua y volverse invisibles o también, brillar en la oscuridad.

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