Anthropocene
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Anthropocene
Human Impact on Planetary Ecology
Curated by Honey Mae
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SpaceX Launches 3D-Printed Part to Space, Creates Printed Engine Chamber for Crewed Spaceflight

SpaceX Launches 3D-Printed Part to Space, Creates Printed Engine Chamber for Crewed Spaceflight | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“ Through 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, robust and high-performing rocket parts can be created and offer improvements over traditional manufacturing methods. SpaceX is pushing the boundaries of what additive manufacturing can do in the 21st century, ultimately making the Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft more reliable, robust and efficient than ever before.”
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Cockroach farming a booming business in China

Cockroach farming a booming business in China | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Cockroaches raised at a farm in China are crushed and used in products ranging from face cream to toothpaste
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CBC News - Food of the future: Bugs, seaweed and vertical farms

CBC News - Food of the future: Bugs, seaweed and vertical farms | Anthropocene | Scoop.it

Via Ana C. Day, Glenn Berger
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Universal 3D Printing Paste Extruder - 3D Printing Industry

Universal 3D Printing Paste Extruder - 3D Printing Industry | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Structur3D's Discov3ry universal paste extruder allows 3D printers to print flexible, viscous materials like frosting, silicone, polyurethane, and clay.

Via Elias Laitila
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Kornel Farkas's curator insight, May 14, 2014 5:05 AM

Nice add on. It can extend everyone printing capabilities who owns a 3D printer.

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The Rise of Anti-Capitalism

The Rise of Anti-Capitalism | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“As production costs plummet, the future lies with nonprofits.”
Via Mikel Arbeloa
Honey Mae's insight:
Who benefits?
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3D Printing Market to Quadruple by 2025 | ENGINEERING.com

3D Printing Market to Quadruple by 2025 | ENGINEERING.com | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
According to Lux Research, the world’s 3D printing market will quadruple by the year 2025, turning it into a $12B industry.In their newly published report, “How 3D Printing Adds Up: Emerging Materials, Processes, Applications, and Business Models”, the Boston-based research firm states that 3D printer sales alone will add up to $3.2B in 2025. Backing that figure will be another $2B in value produced by materials, however, the industry will see the greatest value, $7B, from parts produced by service bureaus.After interviewing almost 100 companies involved in additive manufacturing and devising their own model of the industry, Lux uncovered these three findings: ..Read More....
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Systemic Architecture: Operating Manual for the Self Organizing City (Paperback) - Routledge

Systemic Architecture: Operating Manual for the Self Organizing City (Paperback) - Routledge | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization.
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How Biomimicry Drives Sustainability: From Fish-Inspired Wind Turbines to the Future of 3-D Printing (Video)

How Biomimicry Drives Sustainability: From Fish-Inspired Wind Turbines to the Future of 3-D Printing (Video) | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Interview with Janine Benyus, President of the Biomimicry InstituteBiomimicry has already influenced our lives in more ways than you'd likely begin to imagine: Anti-virus software? Airport scanners? That's biomimicry. If you're a regular Treehugger reader, you already know that. And you probably already know that biomimicry is currently helping to drive some of the most intriguing trends in sustainable design. That's why I was eager to catch up with Janine Benyus, who was a panelist at the 'Form and Function: Designing for Humanity' talk at this year's Clinton Global Initiative.
Via proto-e-co-logics
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Handheld Device TellSpec Can Detect Allergens, Chemicals, and Nutrients In Food

Handheld Device TellSpec Can Detect Allergens, Chemicals, and Nutrients In Food | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“ A hand-held spectrometer pioneered by Toronto-based TellSpec that can determine exactly what is in the user’s food and display it on his or her smartphone.”
Via Wildcat2030
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Edible Batteries Could Power a Range of Smart Pills and Medical Devices

Edible Batteries Could Power a Range of Smart Pills and Medical Devices | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“ Carnegie Mellon materials engineer Christopher Bettinger argues that flexible biodegradable batteries safe for human consumption could maximize the benefits of smart pills and devices “by harnessing simultaneous advantages afforded by...”
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Entomophagy: feeding the 9 Billion | British Ecological Society

Entomophagy: feeding the 9 Billion | British Ecological Society | Anthropocene | Scoop.it

Via Ana C. Day
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Le risque allergique de Tenebrio molitor pour la consommation humaine

Le risque allergique de Tenebrio molitor pour la consommation humaine | Anthropocene | Scoop.it

X. Van der Brempt,D.A. Moneret-Vautrin

 

The allergic risk of Tenebrio molitor for human consumption.


Via Jacques Mignon, David Couchon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:18 AM

Part abstract :

 

"Les larves de Tenebrio molitor (vers de farine) sont particulièrement riches en protéines et sont désormais proposées pour l’alimentation animale. Le pouvoir sensibilisant est élevé. L’asthme professionnel par allergie à ces protéines a été identifié. Dans le cas d’une autorisation éventuelle de l’utilisation de ces protéines pour l’alimentation humaine, le risque allergique doit donc être étudié."

 

" A single case of anaphylaxis to these proteins has been published. Cross-reactivity with other arthropod proteins (such as those from shellfish and house dust mites) raises concern that they may induce reactions in patients already allergic to these arthropods."

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Is Protein-Rich Bug Flour the Solution to World Hunger?

Is Protein-Rich Bug Flour the Solution to World Hunger? | Anthropocene | Scoop.it

In September, a team of McGill University MBA students won the $1 million Hult Prize at the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting.


Via David Couchon
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The 2014 edition of "Jobs, Jobs, Jobs in Space!"

The 2014 edition of "Jobs, Jobs, Jobs in Space!" | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Time marches on, and those of us looking for gainful employment in the space sector will notice quite a few changes from the August 13th, 2013 post "Jobs, Jobs, Jobs in Space!" For those who'd like to keep up to date, here's the latest listing of places you should be approaching if you'd like to work in the space industry...
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Storythinking > Storymaking > Storytelling

"Storytelling" is a long time resident of the charts of educational ideas. As a topic of workshops and presentations (I've done plenty), books (none for me),...

Via José Carlos
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Insects approved for human consumption | Flanders Today

Insects approved for human consumption | Flanders Today | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Insects: Delicious, nutritious, and now officially on the menu in Flanders

Via Ana C. Day, Glenn Berger
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 8, 2014 9:39 PM

"While the EU is yet to come out with a clear position on eating insects, Belgium has taken the lead and legalised its own list of 10, making it the first European country where the consumption of insects is officially allowed. The list includes larvae of mealworms, superworms, the African grasshopper, American desert locust and specific subspecies of crickets and beetles. Retailers who want to put insects on the market first have to be registered with FASFC and abide by all applicable rules concerning hygiene, traceability and labelling."

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Around the World, Social Unrest Starts with Soaring Food Prices

Around the World, Social Unrest Starts with Soaring Food Prices | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
The climate change-fueled battles over food and resources have already begun.
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Stem Cell Printing Could End Osteoarthritis Pain > ENGINEERING.com

Stem Cell Printing Could End Osteoarthritis Pain > ENGINEERING.com | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
cientists at the University of Pittsburg have developed a new 3D printing technique that can replace cartilage in patients suffering from osteoarthritis.Over the last few centuries human lifespans have been growing ever longer. While living well into your 80s, 90s and even beyond 100 years can be rewarding, human biology has yet to catch up with modern medicine’s ability to extend our lifetimes. That unfortunate reality leads to the breakdown of some of a body’s tissues well before the end of its life. ..Read More....
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Unprimed 1

“ A talk by Tim Morton given at the Architectural Association, London, February 4, 2011.”
Via proto-e-co-logics
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A new — and reversible — cause of aging | KurzweilAI

A new — and reversible — cause of aging | KurzweilAI | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered a cause of aging in mammals that may be reversible: a series of molecular events that enable communication inside cells between the nucleus and mitochondria. As communication breaks down, aging accelerates. By administering a molecule naturally produced by the human body, scientists restored the communication network in older mice. Subsequent tissue samples showed key biological hallmarks that were comparable to those of much younger animals. “The aging process we discovered is like a married couple — when they are young, they communicate well, but over time, living in close quarters for many years, communication breaks down,” said Harvard Medical School Professor of Genetics David Sinclair, senior author on the study. “And just like with a couple, restoring communication solved the problem.”
Via Wildcat2030
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Computerizing people may be next step in tech

Computerizing people may be next step in tech | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“ It’s likely the world in the not-so-distant future will be increasingly populated by computerized people like Amal Graafstra. The 37-year-old doesn’t need a key or password to get into his car, home or computer. He’s programmed them to unlock at the mere wave of his hands, which are implanted with radio frequency identification tags. The rice-size gadgets work so well, the Seattle resident says, he’s sold similar ones to more than 500 customers through his company Dangerous Things. The move to outfit people with electronic devices that can be swallowed, implanted in their bodies or attached to their skin via “smart tattoos” could revolutionize health care and change the way people interact with devices and one another. Critics call the trend intrusive, even sacrilegious. But others say it ultimately will make life better for everybody. Some researchers and executives envision a day when devices placed in people will enable them to control computers, prosthetic devices and many other things solely with their thoughts. ”“In the next 10 to 20 years we will see rapid development in bioengineered and man-machine interfaces,” predicted Graafstra, who wrote a book about the technology, adding that the trend is going to “push the boundaries of what it means to be human.” “ .”
Via Wildcat2030
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Google patent: THROAT TATTOO with lie-detecting mobe microphone built-in

Google patent: THROAT TATTOO with lie-detecting mobe microphone built-in | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
“ What could POSSIBLY go wrong?”- Google's Motorola Mobility division has filed an application with the US Patent and Trademark Office for a "system and method" to tattoo a mobile-device microphone with lie-detector circuitry onto your throat. Your immediate response, dear reader, was ours as well: What the...? With such a device tattooed on one's throat, it would make it rather painful to, say, switch carriers, eh? And with a lie detector permanently attached, NSA snoops could have a field day. It wasn't until we had read at least halfway through the 10 pages of US Patent Application No. 20130297301, "Coupling an Electronic Skin Tattoo to a Mobile Device" that we encountered the words "flexible substrate". Whew... After our fears were so allayed, we were able to more objectively evaluate the application, filed on May 3, 2012, and published this Thursday during the USPTO's weekly patent-fest. In sum, some of the filing's ideas seem reasonable, and others risible. We'll begin with the reasonable, then move on from there.
Via Wildcat2030
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The Noisy Future of Farming | Worldwatch Institute

The Noisy Future of Farming | Worldwatch Institute | Anthropocene | Scoop.it

Via Ana C. Day
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Here's What You Need To Know About The Ground-Up Insects Starbucks Puts In Your Frappuccino

Here's What You Need To Know About The Ground-Up Insects Starbucks Puts In Your Frappuccino | Anthropocene | Scoop.it
From a cactus to your beverage.
Honey Mae's insight:

better this than artificial, chemical toxic dyes!

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