animals and prosocial capacities
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animals and prosocial capacities
Prosocial capacities shared by humans and other species: empathy, reciprocity, altruism, bonding, play, tool use, communication
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A Genetic Study Writes a New Origin Story for Dogs

A Genetic Study Writes a New Origin Story for Dogs | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Erik de Castro / Reuters “Not too many people have been bitten during the course of this project,” says Adam Boyko at Cornell University, “but it's not zero.” Boyko's team, fronted by postdoc Laura Shannon, have spent the last seven years...
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Oxytocin nose-drop brings marmoset partners closer

Oxytocin nose-drop brings marmoset partners closer | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, show for the first time that common marmosets—Callithrix jacchus, a species of New World monkey—that receive oxytocin in nose-drops attract more social interaction from their mates. Oxytocin is a hormone released naturally in the blood and brains of humans and other mammals, during social and sexual behaviors. Previous studies showed that individuals who receive an oxytocin boost show greater sociability, through increased cooperation, altrui
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A special badger – with very special protectors

A special badger – with very special protectors | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Edale, Derbyshire I could only stand and marvel: at the badger, but also at the dedication of those working on her behalf
Despite the whispering, our excitement was palpable.
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did you know? - Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens...

did you know? - Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens... | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens follow wolves around a lot, mostly because they just seem to like them. They aren’t known to follow other predators and they prefer to eat with the...
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pdeppisch's comment, October 4, 2015 10:47 PM
Very interesting! Thank you! Some more info: http://www.adirondackwildlife.org/WolvesRavens.html
Jocelyn Stoller's comment, October 7, 2015 9:08 PM
Thank you for the link!
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Monkeys and humans see optical illusions in similar way

Monkeys and humans see optical illusions in similar way | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Monkeys perceive visual illusions in the same way great apes and humans see them, according to researchers.
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Up Close With a Very Smart Orangutan at the Indianapolis Zoo

Up Close With a Very Smart Orangutan at the Indianapolis Zoo | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
After six decades of Zoo visits on five continents, and a number of safari treks through animal habitats in Southern and Western Africa, I frankly thought I had seen it all.
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How to Give a Robin an IQ Test

How to Give a Robin an IQ Test | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Testing whether individual animals are smarter than others of their species is tricky
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Sand Octopus Turns its Body into a Squirt Gun to Burrow

Sand Octopus Turns its Body into a Squirt Gun to Burrow | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
In another episode of “Cephalopods are Basically the Most Amazing Creatures on Earth,” today we get an inside look at the burrowing habits of the southern sand octopus, the pressurized hose of the animal kingdom.
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Why is that dog looking at me?

Among the deep and intriguing phenomena that attract intense scientific interest are the birth and death of the universe, the intricacies of the human brain and the way dogs look at humans.. Read more at straitstimes.com.
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Citizen Scientists Contribute to Dog Research

Citizen Scientists Contribute to Dog Research | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Five hundred citizen scientists around the world have contributed data to a study of what goes on inside the minds of their dogs.

The research, appearing Sept. 16 in Plos One, analyzes data collected by 500 dog owners who played the same games at home that researchers use in the laboratory to find out about a dog’s cognitive skills and problem-solving.

On five of the seven tests analyzed, citizen science data corresponded closely to what had been produced by labs at Duke University and elsewhere.

For example, in one of the game-like tests, dogs were found to rely more on their memory than their sense of smell to find a hidden treat. The dogs watched as their owner hid food under one of two cups. Then while the dog’s vision was obscured, the owner switched the food to the other cup. (See a YouTube video of the experimental protocol at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toJZMfnc8ig

If dogs could smell the food, they should have been able to choose the correct cup, but owners found that most dogs went to where they last saw the food.

The data were collected through a website called Dognition.com that was developed by Brian Hare, an associate professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke who studies primate and dog cognition. Hare is also the founder of the Canine Cognition Center at Duke, which has a network of 1,000 dog owners who can bring their pets into the lab to participate in research.

“They’re just games,” Hare said. “The owners love playing them and the dogs love playing them. I realized more people could play them if they were online.”
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Navy to restrict training to protect marine life - UPI.com

Navy to restrict training to protect marine life - UPI.com | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
The U.S. Navy agreed to restrictions on use of sonar and underwater explosives tests which have disturbed marine life off the California and Hawaii coasts.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Terrified Dolphin Throws Himself At Man's Feet To Escape Hunters

Terrified Dolphin Throws Himself At Man's Feet To Escape Hunters | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Taiji, Japan, is a bloodbath once again — and a heartbreaking video captures the final moments of the hunt's first victims.
-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.
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Cognitive Dissonance and Animals

Cognitive Dissonance and Animals | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Cognitive Dissonance and Animals. Why do we consider some animals as companions and others merely food animals?
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No Sex Needed: All-Female Lizard Species Cross Their Chromosomes to Make Babies

No Sex Needed: All-Female Lizard Species Cross Their Chromosomes to Make Babies | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Since the 1960s scientists have known that some species of whiptail lizards need a male even less than a fish needs a bicycle. These all-lady lizard species (of the Aspidoscelis genus) from Mexico and the U.S. Southwest manage to produce well-bred offspring without the aid of male fertilization.

But how do they—and the other 70 species of vertebrates that propagate this way—do it without the genetic monotony and disease vulnerability that often results from asexual reproduction? "It has remained unclear" and "has been the topic of much speculation," report a team of researchers who aimed to answer just that question. Their results were published online February 21 in the journal Nature. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.)
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Why You Should Never, Ever Poke A Sleeping Sea Otter

Why You Should Never, Ever Poke A Sleeping Sea Otter | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, a sea otter was sleeping while floating in the ocean, peacefully unaware of a nearby boat of gawking, giggling humans.
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This Baby Orangutan's Story Illustrates The Best And The Worst Of Human Nature

This Baby Orangutan's Story Illustrates The Best And The Worst Of Human Nature | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
One soulful picture captures the painful torture that farming can inflict on orangutans. Back in 2010, a mother orangutan ventured near a village in Borneo after a landslide, her little baby still clinging to her.
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Chimpanzee personality linked to anatomy of brain structures

Chimpanzee personality linked to anatomy of brain structures | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees' personality traits are linked to the anatomy of specific brain structures, according to researchers. The researchers studied 107 chimpanzees' brains using magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans and also assessed each chimpanzee's personality by using a 41-item personality questionnaire. They found chimpanzees who were rated as higher for the personality traits of openness and extraversion had greater gray-matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex in both hemispheres of the brain
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Rats are bringing out best in kids with autism | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Rats are bringing out best in kids with autism | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Big, beautiful golden retrievers, gentle greyhounds and incredibly well-trained dogs of all breeds have charmed and comforted children and

Via Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts
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Death metal music attracts sharks, documentary crew finds out marine #biology #Science

Death metal music attracts sharks, documentary crew finds out marine #biology #Science | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
A documentary film crew hit upon a novel technique to attract great white sharks - blasting death metal through an underwater speaker.

Via CineversityTV
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Giraffes spend their evenings humming to each other | New Scientist

Giraffes spend their evenings humming to each other | New Scientist | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Biologists have long been curious to know whether giraffes produce any substantial sounds. Audio recordings from three giraffe houses in European zoos suggest they do

Via Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Cultural Infusion's curator insight, September 20, 2015 6:44 PM

These beautiful creatures are communicating with one another in a very unique way, Giraffes produce these special sounds to talk to one another. 

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Citizen Scientists Contribute to Dog Research

Citizen Scientists Contribute to Dog Research | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Five hundred citizen scientists around the world have contributed data to a study of what goes on inside the minds of their dogs.

The research, appearing Sept. 16 in Plos One, analyzes data collected by 500 dog owners who played the same games at home that researchers use in the laboratory to find out about a dog’s cognitive skills and problem-solving.

On five of the seven tests analyzed, citizen science data corresponded closely to what had been produced by labs at Duke University and elsewhere.

For example, in one of the game-like tests, dogs were found to rely more on their memory than their sense of smell to find a hidden treat. The dogs watched as their owner hid food under one of two cups. Then while the dog’s vision was obscured, the owner switched the food to the other cup. (See a YouTube video of the experimental protocol at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toJZMfnc8ig

If dogs could smell the food, they should have been able to choose the correct cup, but owners found that most dogs went to where they last saw the food.

The data were collected through a website called Dognition.com that was developed by Brian Hare, an associate professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke who studies primate and dog cognition. Hare is also the founder of the Canine Cognition Center at Duke, which has a network of 1,000 dog owners who can bring their pets into the lab to participate in research.

“They’re just games,” Hare said. “The owners love playing them and the dogs love playing them. I realized more people could play them if they were online.”
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Sperm Whales Have Their Own Culture, Marine Biologists Say | Biology | Sci-News.com

Sperm Whales Have Their Own Culture, Marine Biologists Say | Biology | Sci-News.com | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Culture in animal societies is a highly debated topic. Some scientists think it’s clear enough, while others don’t think the word ‘culture’ should be used describing anything but humans.
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