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Literary Criticism : STATIC AND TRANSFORMATIVE IMAGES IN SHAKESPEARE'S DRAMATIC ART

Literary Criticism : STATIC AND TRANSFORMATIVE IMAGES IN SHAKESPEARE'S DRAMATIC ART | Andrew's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Andrew Matulaitis's insight:

In this criticism of A Midsummer Night's Dream, it analyses the how Shakespeare writing were meant to be seen in dramatic theatre, not only read. It shows how important it is for the use of images or act outs in order to enhance the meaning of his plays. One such example would kind of be like what we did in our class. We took the time to act out what it would be like to be in the theatre, and even acted out the first couple acts. In the criticism, it really informs the reader that Shakespeare’s writings are better understood when performed in a theatre such as The Globe. Shakespeare was not writing for people to go home and read over the play, he was writing as a form of entertainment. He was writing in a way that could be elegant for the upper class citizens and yet a real down to Earth form so the Groundlings watching could understand what was going on by watching the actors. Shakespeare not only wrote the dialogue, but he also wrote a simple and very effective for the actors to get the dialogue across to the Groundlings. 

 

Knapp, James A. "Static And Transformative Images In Shakespeare's Dramatic Art." Criticism 54.3 (2012): 377-389. Literary Reference Center. Web. 2 Mar. 2013.

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Bradley Shatraw's comment, March 3, 2013 2:14 PM
Great comment on how "how important it is for the use of images of act outs in order to enhance the meaning of his plays." Very interesting! It was clever and I competely agree!
Andrew Matulaitis's comment, March 7, 2013 8:24 PM
Thank you! It could probably help out a lot of people in high school, trying to understand the language of Shakespeare.
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Source: The Canterbury Tales

Source: The Canterbury Tales | Andrew's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Andrew Matulaitis's insight:

Shakespeare's work’s has been widely criticized for not using his own ideas when writing his pieces, such as A Midsummer Night's Dream. One such source that he used for ideas in the writing of A Midsummer Night's Dream is Geoffrey Chaucer's writing of The Canterbury Tales. This piece of work explains and depicts the characters Theseus and Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night's Dream. In the Canterbury tales, it depicts and explains why Hippolyta is considered the "Queen of the Amazons." She is considered to be the "Queen of the Amazons," because Theseus brought her back from his last war, in the Amazons. He is said to be returning victoriously with what soon will be his wife. It has also depicts the fights that go on between Demetrius and Lysander over the lovely Hermia, but with different names. The Canterbury Tales is surprisingly, and almost astonishing, basically the exact same story as Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. The Canterbury Tales is most definitely Shakespeare's number one source when writing A Midsummer Night's Dream. 

 

Gould, Karen, and Jane L. Ball. "The Canterbury Tales." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-4. Literary Reference Center. Web. 11 Feb. 2013.

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Julia Cloutier's comment, March 13, 2013 8:57 PM
i really like how you tied all the articles together Andrew. The visual aspect of the way Shakespeare went about his works was something new and refreshing!
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Historical Article: Visual art enhances the learning of Shakespeare

Historical Article: Visual art enhances the learning of Shakespeare | Andrew's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Andrew Matulaitis's insight:

Whether it be the vocabulary or the plot of the play, Shakespeare can be challenging to many high school students. Understanding Shakespeare does not have to be so challenging. There are many techniques such as acting out the play or watching a modern rendition that can help to make Shakespeare less challenging. Visuals help to enhance the connection made between the new information and the prior information student’s posess. Although the article may not mention A Midsummer Night's Dream, it does help to understand the symbolism of the play and the plot of the play.

 

Barry, Arlene L. "Visual Art Enhances The Learning Of Shakespeare." Education 117.4 (1997): 632. Academic Search Elite. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

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Image: American Watercolors — John Anster Fitzgerald (1832-1906) -Titania and the Changeling Child - A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Image: American Watercolors — John Anster Fitzgerald (1832-1906) -Titania and the Changeling Child - A Midsummer Night’s Dream | Andrew's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
W. Graham Arader III: Paintings, rare books, prints, maps and atlases.
Andrew Matulaitis's insight:

Visualization is very useful, especially when dealing with Shakespearean plays. They can be very hard to imagine, and seeing them acted out, whether it be with actors or pictures, can really enhance the meaning of the sometimes-confusing dialogue. In this image from A Midsummer Night's Dream, It depicts of how the fairies would of looked like. It also can be used as a visual aid when reading with Act II, since most of Act II takes place in the wooded areas outside of Athens. Another Act that this image could help clarify confusing aspects would be Act III, which deals a lot with fairies. This image also depicts what the child looked like that Titania and Oberon are fighting over. Unlike other writings, Shakespeare’s writing's can be better interpreted if there are images to correspond with what happens. 

 

Fitzgerald, John Anster. "American Watercolors — John Anster Fitzgerald (1832-1906) -Titania and the Changeling Child - A Midsummer NightÂ’s Dream." American Watercolors — John Anster Fitzgerald (1832-1906) -Titania and the Changeling Child. Aradar Galleries, n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2013. <http://www.aradergalleries.com/detail.php?id=2867&gt;.

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Ben Stone's comment, March 12, 2013 6:59 PM
Why does this help relate to your theme? Was it just random?
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Video: Midsummer Night's Dream - Part 1 (1999)

Andrew Matulaitis's insight:

This clip is an example of an easy interpretation of Acts I and II. This clip is very accurate with the details it provides and shows an easy interpretation for anyone who might have been struggling to understand the challenging language of Shakespeare. Unlike many animations, it keeps true to what happens in the play and yet still incorporates some of Shakespeares language, in a way that is very easy to understand. After watching this short clip, I can assure you that you will be able to understand to understand what is going on, no matter how confused you were.   

 

Midsummer Night's Dream - Part 1 (1999). Dir. Disney. Youtube. N.p., 13 June 2009. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMIAGXDyN-s&gt;

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