And the Mountains They Echoed
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And the Mountains Echoed: Khaled Hosseini: 9781594631764: Amazon.com: Books

And the Mountains Echoed

~ Khaled Hosseini (author) More about this product
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And the Mountains Echoed [Khaled Hosseini] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. An unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else. Khaled Hosseini
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In And the Mountains they Echoed hardworking farmer, Saboor, is struggling to make a living, as a drought has ruined his crops in the rural city Shadbagh of Afghanistan. He is unable to support his family, and decides the only way to make some money is to sell his youngest daughter, Pari, to his brother-in-law's boss, Mr and Mrs. Wahdati. The deal comes with one condition, however: Saboor and his family may never come visit Pari again. Throughout the book, Khaled Hosseini explores how one drastic event can impact so many people, with each chapter written in the point of view of another person. The first is written by the point of view of Abdullah, who is overly attached to his sister, Pari and how he sneaks out of his house to accompany Saboor to Kabul as he sells her to Mr. and Mrs. Wahditi. The next chapter is written as a letter by Nabi, Saboor's brother-in-law, to Markos, the new landowner of the Wahditi house, about his relationship with Mr. and Mrs. Wahditi, and how Mrs. Wahditi leaves her husband to go to Paris with Saboor's daughter Pari. The next surrounds a young Afghan man from America, Idris, who with his friend, Timur, goes back to Afghanistan in 2010, after years of war and terror to claim back their valuable land of their ancestors, and in the process meet Markos. Chapter 6 is written by Pari, and her scarred relationship with her mother in Paris. Her life is boring and tasteless before she recieves a message from Markos to come to Afghanistan and claim back her land given to her by Nabi. The next chapter revolves around, Adel, the son of a very rich businessman, in Shabagh and how war has changed the place completely. While he is there he meets a young boy named Gholam who claims Adel is living on their land and as it turns out is Abdullah's brother. The nest chapter surrounds Markos's life and why he came to Afhanistan and his relationship with Nabi. The final chapter focuses on how Pari finally meets her brother in America after 65 long years.

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Children for Sale

Children for Sale | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
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The documentary, "Children for Sale," describes the hostile environment in which rural Afghans must live their life. The film focuses specifically on one man and his wife who are struggling to make enough money to make a living. In these situations, the only options the villagers have are to sell their children to the wealthy businessmen in Kabul and other big cities. Most specifically a woman named Sadeeqa, buys one of the families only boys to take to Kabul with her. It's sad to think that the price tag on the child is only around $1500. The parents of the child are extremely disappointed with the father stating, "I'm selling a piece of my heart, to keep the rest of it beating." He's referring to the fact that all his other children need food and water to say alive. Furthermore what is more saddening is that the child doesn't even get to say his goodbyes as he is pulled away from his mother by Sadeeqa who doesn't want him to stay connected with the rest of his family any longer. Sadeeqa, however, promises the family that she will provide him with all the education and money he needs to succeed.

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Remembering Afghanistan’s Golden Age - NYTimes.com

Remembering Afghanistan’s Golden Age - NYTimes.com | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
From the 1930s to the 1970s, Afghanistan had a semblance of a national government and Kabul was known as “the Paris of Central Asia.”
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Through the article Elisabeth Bumiller describes the golden age of Afghanistan from 1940-1970, and how Afghan society has changed so drastically due to the Taliban. Bumiller talks about how Kabul was labeled as the "Paris of Central Asia" during the time of stability they had during that era. Furthermore she claims that women, "not only attended Kabul University, they did so in miniskirts." Kabul's tourist industry was booming with people from India, Pakistan, and Turkey all came there to visit the beautiful snow-capped mountains and beautiful gardens. Mr Jawad even insisted that, "Afghanistan was less tribal than New York." It's hard to think that after the Soviet invasion nothing was ever the same again. Beautiful gardens was replaced with complete destruction and debris. Once the Soviets left, the Taliban took over, and it led to Kabul, once a beautiful city, into the center of a war zone.

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Afghan Village

Afghan Village | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
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The following article shows the hardships of the Afghan people living in the rural Afghan villages. Although Kabul might be modern and close to the western world, the rest of Afghanistan is filled with poverty. This allows the Taliban to make huge impacts and influence tons of people to join them in their fight.

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Afghan IDP's and Refugees

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This interesting document represents the population displacement of Afghanistan. It is important to note that over 3.7 million people have been displaced over the last 40 years. Undoubtedly this is directly linked to the Afghan War and the Taliban. Recently what is starting to happen is that countries like Iran and Pakistan that housed the Afghans are starting to send Afghans back. The result is tens of thousands of people living in temporary camps

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UNHCR - Afghanistan

UNHCR - Afghanistan | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
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The UNHCR organization in Afghanistan addressees many issues that have come about in Afghanistan the last ten years. Established in 2002, UNHCR, United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees, help many of the people that have been displaced due to the Afghan War in the last ten years. First and foremost, the statistics of the organization show that there are more than 650,000 people that have been internally displaced in the country. Furthermore it is important to note that every single one of them have been helped by the organization. Another statistic that is listed on the website is that over 172,000 ex-refugees that originated in Afghanistan but had left to go to Pakistan due to the war have also been helped. These returnees live in refugee camps similar to the ones they lived in when they left to go to Pakistan. An important thing to note is that you can contact the organization by calling them at (41 -22 -739 -7500) or visiting their head quarters in Kabul at 41 Peace Avenue, Shar-e-new, Kabul.

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Selling little girls to pay back debt

Selling little girls to pay back debt | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
By Samuel Burke, CNN

The mother of a little Afghan girl cannot even turn to face her daughter. She looks down in shame as she explains why she must hand the girl over to drug lords.
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In the article, "Selling Little Girls to Pay Back Rent," author Samuel Burke focuses on the issue of human trafficking for money and forgiven debts. Burke writes of a young Afghan mother and father who sell their daughter in order to get rid of their outstanding debts. Although the parents do not want to sell their child, they feel they have no other option as Afghan druglords threaten to kill the family if they do not pay back their owed debts. Drugs have become a huge issue for people in Afghanistan as it is the world's center and highest producer for opium in the world. Jamie Doran, producer of the PBS film Opium Brides, claims that there is a video of a man who had outstanding debts and refused to sell his daughter, and in return was beheaded by a pen knife. Burke pleads that the government should come and help considering over 5,000 children have been taken by the druglords, but the Afghan government has yet to come up with a solution to help the farmers.

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AFGHANISTAN: Increased number of returnees from Pakistan

AFGHANISTAN: Increased number of returnees from Pakistan | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
More Afghan refugees returned home from Pakistan in 2010 than in the previous year, despite increased insecurity in Afghanistan, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) says.
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In the article, "Afghanistan: Increased Number of Returnees from Pakistan," the author focuses on the increased migration of Afghan refugees in Pakistan, back to Afghanistan. In a 7 month period of 2010, over 104,000 Afghans returned to their home from Pakistan, despite the continued insecurity in Afghanistan. In all, the articles stays that over 4.5 million Afghans have returned home since 2002. Although these Afghans have returned home, UNHCR says only 29% have opted not to return to their home areas. Furthermore all the land that the refugees left when they went to Pakistan has been occupied and taken by the government. Thus the Afghans have been placed in informal housing settlements with good conditions. The NGO International Medical Corps says it provides health services to over 150,000 returnees who are not provided those same services by the national Afghan government. The refugees however, claim that the land should be redistributed by the government to all the people that owned them. This gives them an opportunity to build houses again and get their lives, that they lost due to the war, back and lead a normal life.

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Afghanistan large color map

Afghanistan large color map | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
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The map of Afghanistan shows a lot about the type of people that live there. It is important to note that besides a few small cities, Afghanistan is mostly made up of rural lands. There is a lot of empty space in the middle that implies that there are many places for the Taliban to hide in mountains

 

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School of rural Afghanistan

School of rural Afghanistan | And the Mountains They Echoed | Scoop.it
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This captivating photo shows an ordinary school in rural Afghanistan. It is important to note that school is very small and there are a lot of kids in the picture. Even though the government is trying to send kids to school and get rid of the influence of the Taliban, it doesn't help with small schools, considering most of the Taliban's influence is on little kids in small villages.

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