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10 Interesting Facts about the Colosseum in Rome | Localnomad Blog

10 Interesting Facts about the Colosseum in Rome | Localnomad Blog | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Discover the most interesting facts about the Coliseum! The top 10 about the largest amphitheater in the world. Read here and be blown away with some of these
Yeva P's insight:

A few random facts I learned from this article: The Coliseum has over 80 entrances; 500,000 people lost their lives during the ancient Roman games; festivals and games could last up to 100 days in the Coliseum; it took 9 years to build using over 60,000 slaves; most of the damage seen today was caused by the earthquakes of 847 AD and 1231 AD. 

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Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome

Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Yeva P's insight:

In ancient Rome, only the richest could afford indoor plumbing. The people that did have indoor plumbing were charged a fee based on the size of their pipes. It is said--but maybe not true--that some emperors (in particular Claudius) who conducted public business from the royal "thrones." The water from the latrines, along with what came out of private homes, was collected into a giant sewerage system called Cloaca Maxima. Eventually, Romans sometimes had to cover up their sewers with stone vaults made of stone to contain the smell. 

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Cards-N-Time Games: Ancient Greece

Cards-N-Time Games: Ancient Greece | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
We are in the month every fourth winter when we spend our evenings watching the Winter Olympics. This is an anomaly because it is a shared cultural experience dating back more than 2,500 years and yet it engrosses a nation that has disavowed the teaching of history in its universities, the very concept of “civilization” let alone the importance of Greece to Western Civilization, and is embroiled on multiple fronts in the issue of amateurism in sports. Putin spends $50 billion of Russia’s national treasure on the Sochi Olympics to change the world’s collective memory of its history, and we race into the future not only ignoring but denying the influence of our past.
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Ancient Rural Town Uncovered in Israel : DNews

Ancient Rural Town Uncovered in Israel : DNews | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
The 2,300-year-old rural village was found on the outskirts of Jerusalem.
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The First Computers, Lasers, Robots, And More: Ancient Innovations From Our Distant Ancestors

The First Computers, Lasers, Robots, And More: Ancient Innovations From Our Distant Ancestors | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Does the original computer really trace back to 100 BCE? Were lasers invented by Archimedes? Time machine: set for stunning.
Yeva P's insight:

Scientists have found what they call the Antikythera mechanism which is the ancient Roman's version of a computer. The computer dates to 100 BCE and contained about 32 gears and dials, and was used to predict astrological phenomena. The first programmable robot was invented around 150 AD by a Greek scientist who also invented an early steam engine, hydraulics, and other automated devices. 

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Walking Wounded – PTSD from Ancient Greece to Afghanistan

Walking Wounded – PTSD from Ancient Greece to Afghanistan | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
While the term post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) wasn’t officially coined by psychologists until 1980, both military and civilian psychologists had spent a great deal of previous decade seeing ...
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Although PTSD is a recently coined term, here has been evidence found that PTSD has been going on for thousands of years.  The account of an ancient Greek historian Herodotus, reveals that a veteran from the battle of Marathon in 490BCE suffered from PTSD. After an especially traumatic encounter on the battle field, he lost his vision without any wounds present. 

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The Romans: Marriage And Weddings

The Romans: Marriage And Weddings | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
In our ongoing series about the daily life of the Ancient Romans we look at how they tied the knot
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Around 18BC, Emperor Augustus  marriage, was against adultery, and wanted to increase the Roman birth rate by encouraging childbearing. The Emperor raised taxes on unmarried men and women, and made adultery a crime that was punishable by exile. The more elite men and women were in society, the younger they got married--mostly to forge alliances and to consolidate power, wealth, and territory.  

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DNA shows ancient hunter had blue eyes, dark skin | Arts+Culture

DNA shows ancient hunter had blue eyes, dark skin | Arts+Culture | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
BERLIN (AP) — A hunter-gatherer who lived in Europe some 7,000 years ago probably had blue eyes and dark skin, a combination that has largely disappeared from the continent in the millennia since, scientists said Tuesday.

The discovery, publishe
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After performing DNA analysis on an ancient male tooth found in a cave in Spain, researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona have concluded that the combination of blue eyes and dark skin may have been common among ancient European hunter gatherers. Their DNA analysis also showed that the man had a hard time digesting milk and starch. The researchers hope to find more ancient DNA so they can make further discoveries. 

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A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome - Ray Laurence - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-yea...
Yeva P's insight:

This is an interesting Ted-ed video that talks about what a day for an ancient Roman teenager would be like. I learned a few things including: Half of the children in ancient Rome die before they reach adulthood, therefore turning 15 is considered an important milestone. Also, when a male turns 17, he is arranged to marry a girl 10 years younger than him. 

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Ancient Shipwreck Points to Site of Major Roman Battle

Ancient Shipwreck Points to Site of Major Roman Battle | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Part of a sunken warship recently found in the Mediterranean Sea may for the first time confirm the site of a major ancient battle where Rome trounced Carthage.
Yeva P's insight:

A shipwreck was discovered near the island of Levanzo, west of Sicily that is thought to be the ancient warship from the last battle of the first Punic war. Only three rams were found, because the rest of the ship was made of wood and probably rotted away. The first ram has been confirmed to be Roman because of its Latin inscriptions, however, the other two rams were plain and researchers are still trying to confirm their origins. 

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The Oxford of ancient times: Apollania - World Bulletin

The Oxford of ancient times: Apollania - World Bulletin | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
One of Albania's touristic hot spots, Apollonia ancient town demonstrates the country's deep-rooted historical richness. It was an ancient Greek city in...
Yeva P's insight:

Apollonia, Albania used to be an educational center for Roman elites. Although excavation has been going on and off since the 1920s, only about 7% of the city has been uncovered. Archaeologists have been able to find the library, theatre, administrative building and sanctuary. Reserachers believe that the city's population peaked at 60 thousand, but decreased after an earthquake in 3rd century BC. 

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The Ten Most Scandalous Women of Ancient Rome | Latin Language Blog

The Ten Most Scandalous Women of Ancient Rome | Latin Language Blog | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Which women do you think made the list for the most infamous,scandalous, and malicious of antiquity?
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Why do we make New Year resolutions? Because of ancient Rome | PsyPost

Why do we make New Year resolutions? Because of ancient Rome | PsyPost | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
As many of us start to think about our New Year’s resolutions (or breaking them), we may not realise that the tradition of making promises on the first day of the year is a custom started by our Roman ancestors.
Yeva P's insight:

The tradition of new year's resolutions started in Ancient Rome. On January 1st, there would be a huge ceremony that signified the renewal of bonds between citizens, the state and the gods. On this day, Romans would celebrate "Janus: the god of new beginnings who had two faces--one looking into the past and another looking into the future". Romans would reflect on the past year and prepare for the year ahead. 

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Terra Antica - The Baths of Caracalla: Where Ancient Romans Got Naked, Clean, And Well-Read

Terra Antica - The Baths of Caracalla: Where Ancient Romans Got Naked, Clean, And Well-Read | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Where Ancient Romans got naked, clean, and well-read.
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Were the ancient Greeks and Romans colour blind?

Were the ancient Greeks and Romans colour blind? | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Homer left historians with the impression that the ancient Greeks and Romans had an underdeveloped appreciation of colour.
Yeva P's insight:

Initially, some people believed that ancient Romans had an under-developed color sense. To test this, researchers reviewed ancient texts and came to find that ancient people saw and thought of color in a very different way than how people do today. For example, a wooden table would be called wood-colored instead of brown, and a window would be called glass-colored instead of clear. 

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Chemical Weapons Got Their Start In Ancient Rome - KnowledgeNuts

Chemical Weapons Got Their Start In Ancient Rome - KnowledgeNuts | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Use of and the threat of chemical agents used in modern warfare have sent governments worldwide scrambling for a way to regulate the use and possibility of chemical warfare. It's not a new idea, however, and archaeologists have found evidence that the idea of using poison gas as a weapon dates to about A.D. 256, when it was first used in what is now Syria.
Yeva P's insight:

This article talks about chemical warfare in ancient times. "The first evidence of chemical warfare comes from an area of Roman-controlled Syria in the year 256 A.D."  When Persians were trying to regain control of their land from the Romans, they would use chemical warfare. Persians would ignite mixtures of sulfur and bitumen that turned into a deadly gas and set it off in tunnels where Romans were. 

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Ancient Greece - Smarthistory

Ancient Greece - Smarthistory | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Art history introduction about Ancient Greece and Rome.

Via Khai Tran
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Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 2014 3:20 PM

Nancy Ross and her video touches a lot of ancient Greek and Roman art, as they were very similar and how Rome adopted many of Greece's traditions. Their art was very centralized around human figure, nude, perfect, and proportional.

claudia patino's curator insight, February 24, 2014 7:45 PM

When I see a sculpture of a nude man I quickly think the Romans. Now I learned it was also a Greek form of art. I also learned both Romans and Greeks have there our gods for the same thing but different names.

Kelsey Cherise Quates's curator insight, April 17, 2014 6:08 PM

This a very cool art style that is portrayed in the video also it gives brief history on the backgrounds of the Romans and the Greeks. The Romans took many of their inspiration from Greek art and architecture but made it their own.

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25 Influential Pieces Of Ancient Greek Architecture - List25

25 Influential Pieces Of Ancient Greek Architecture - List25 | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Ancient Greek architecture is most popular for its temples. This type of architecture was produced by the Hellenic people whose culture thrived on Mainland Greece, the Aegean Islands and in colonies in the Asia Minor ...
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Ancient Rome’s fraudulent foreign students

Ancient Rome’s fraudulent foreign students | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Foreign students getting on to courses under false pretences, overstaying their welcome and so on are nothing new. Ask the Romans.
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Around 370 AD, Rome started to allow foreign students in their town. There were certain rules and background checks (like those today) that were put in place to see if the student was qualified. The student had to disclose the town they lived in, birth certificate, and reports of achievement. The students were also expected to behave well and to be devoted to their studies. 

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Four sisters in Ancient Rome - Ray Laurence - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-yea...
Yeva P's insight:

This is Ted-ed video talking about what life would be like for some girls in ancient Rome. Some things I learned are: When an engaged woman wants to go out in public, she must wear her betrothal ring as well as all of the other jewelry that her fiance has given her as a way of showing to the public that she is engaged. Women had no place in the Senate house, law court, or forum--these were considered men's places. 

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Ancient Delphi- The Navel of the World

Ancient Delphi- The Navel of the World | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Nestled between the rugged peak of Mount Parnassus and a spectacular valley of cypress and olive trees, is Delphi- regarded by ancient Greeks as the most sacred site in the world.Delphi is said to have been founded by Zeus, who determined it to be the centre of the world. Mythology holds that…
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The Medieval Marvel of Normandy - Traveleering

The Medieval Marvel of Normandy - Traveleering | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
Viewed from the flat stretches of the Normandy shore, the abbey of Mont St. Michel rises over the water like a ghostly apparition.
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Ancient Roman Sport Stars: Chariot Racers | Latin Language Blog

Ancient Roman Sport Stars: Chariot Racers | Latin Language Blog | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
From the charioteer that earned billions to the horses who were victims of curses to the fan who threw himself on funeral pyre; Explore Roman Chariot Racing!
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Ancient DNA Overturns Assumptions About Baby Killings

Ancient DNA Overturns Assumptions About Baby Killings | Ancient European Cities | Scoop.it
A new look at a cache of baby bones discovered in Britain is altering assumptions about why ancient Romans committed infanticide. Infant girls were apparently not killed more often than baby boys, researchers report in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. "Very often, societies have preferred male offspring, so when they practice infanticide, it tends to be the male babies that are kept, and the female babies that are killed," said study researcher Simon Mays, a skeletal biologist for English Heritage, a non-governmental organization that protects historic sites. Though ancient Romans indeed preferred boys, there is no evidence they went as far as infanticide to skew the sex ratio, Mays told LiveScience. [The Science of Death: 10 Tales from the Crypt] Tiny skeletons Mays and his colleagues used a technique called ancient DNA analysis to study infant bones found at a site called Yewden Villa, near Hambleden, in England.
Yeva P's insight:

The theory that ancient Romans committed infanticide to control the population's sex ratio is being revisted due to recent discoveries. Skeletal biologist Simon Mays and his colleagues used ancient DNA analysis to study infant bones of 33 infant skeletons and found that the ratio of female to male bones seemed relatively equal. Although males were favored in the Roman culture in general, there is no evidence proving that baby girls were killed more often. 

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