hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia
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Outback House - Aboriginal bush foods

Outback House - Aboriginal bush foods | hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia | Scoop.it
Imagine leaving your home and travelling back over 150 years to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians...
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This short clip is taken from the series on ‘Outback House’ on ABC Splash. It is listed as a resource for teaching history for year 3, 4 & 5 of primary school. It provides glimpses of some survival skills taught by Aboriginal Australians to the European settlers in outback Australia. It provides useful guidelines for educators regarding the discussions which can be made with students before, during and after viewing the video to engage the students in the thinking process. There are a number of other videos from the same series which can be explored too. “The students can be made to explore the role that a significant individual or group played in shaping a colony; for example, explorers, farmers, entrepreneurs, artists, writers, humanitarians, religious and political leaders, and Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples” (ABC Splash, 2014).

The teacher can have discussions around the importance of land for the aboriginal people and their connections to it and the change in these connections with the arrival of Europeans. The changes in the local community can be observed by guiding the students to find out about the people who first came and settled in the local area and how did they make a living. This can be done either by a visit to a local heritage museum or consulting with the NSW Aboriginal Educative Consultant Group and organising a visit from a local Aboriginal Elder or any other person of the community. Board of Studies, NSW (2008, p. 20) also highlights the fact that students can learn in a much better way about Aboriginal history and culture by listening to the experiences of Aboriginal people.

The students can make their own timelines of research about the history of Aboriginal people in their local area and support it with photographs of the past and recounts of Aboriginal people wherever possible. These can be compared to the present scenario and photographs of the local Aboriginal community and their reflections can be gathered in relation to why the changes happened. This idea aligns with one of the elements of historical skills- ‘Analysis and use of resources’ described by ACARA (as cited in Hoepper, 2014, p.191).

The teacher can make it more vivid with the use of the maps shown on this website: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/shared/abmaps/maps.htm

The website provides information about the Aboriginal maps of Sydney and NSW, map of Aboriginal Australia and list of NSW Nations and helps students to identify what their local area is based on where they live in Sydney/NSW.

1. Board of Studies, NSW (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: A guide to community consultations and protocols. Board of Studies: Author.

2. Hoepper, B. (2014). History in the Australian curriculum. In R. Gilbert & B. Hoepper (Ed.), Teaching humanities and social sciences: History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian curriculum (pp. 176- 196). Victoria, Australia: Cengage Learning.

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Sikhs become part of the Woolgoolga community

Sikhs become part of the Woolgoolga community | hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia | Scoop.it
How does a large increase in the number of migrants to a town affect the local people? In this clip from 1984, the head...
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The video shows the head priest of an Indian temple in Woolgoolga talking about their contribution to the community. This video has been listed as an educational resource for Year 10 but it can be simplified by the teacher to highlight and limit the discussion (about the influence of Indian migration on the economy and culture of a community in Australia) in terms of stage 2 requirements of the NSW syllabus under the strand of ‘change and continuity’ (Board of Studies, NSW, 2006, p.9). The teacher can bring to forth the contribution of banana farming in Woolgoolga and the temple as a major tourist attraction of the country town which add to the economy of the region. It can be used to provide the opportunity to students to investigate the arrival of different cultural groups and the effects of change in the area (Board of Studies, 2006, p.56). There is another interesting online resource describing stories of people who migrated from South East Asia-(http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/southasianstories/index.shtml) which can be used for further scaffolding.

After the video, the students can explore their own family history as homework and bring facts related to their background, culture, celebrations, practices, their parents’ or ancestors occupations and interests. They can interview their parents about the origin of their family, if any of their ancestors were born overseas then why and how did they come to Australia and bring a written transcript to the class. They can also ask how the community in which they live has changed over the years. The students can organise this information in a scrapbook about their family and wherever possible provide photographs to support the information. They can provide descriptions and photographs of the food eaten in their households, type of clothes they wear, any religious practices they follow, a sample of writing of the spoken language (if it is different to English). The students can then share and discuss the information in scrapbook with their peers and reflect on the similarities and differences.

 

Board of Studies, NSW (2006). Human society and its environment K-6. Board of Studies: NSW
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Immigration Nation

Immigration Nation | hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia | Scoop.it
Immigration Nation
Ritu Kapoor's insight:

This series on SBS explores the role of immigrants in Australia in shaping its future in different aspects of agriculture, transport, food, design, sports, communication etc. The website introduces a number of migrants from different parts of the world including John Arkan (who is of Indian origin). It provides useful insight into the history of John’s life in Australia after migration and how it shaped the local community of Woolgoolga. It also briefs upon the aspects of Indian culture like religious practices, food habits, agriculture as the major income earner and the social practices of Indian community.

The students can be shown the video around John Arkan and asked to explore a case study of a person of Indian origin settled in Australia (can be someone they know or online). They can base their research on questions like when and how did the person migrate, what was their reason for moving to Australia, what is their occupation, spoken language, social customs and traditions they follow and their staple food. They can be made to write an information report on the same basis which will be also helpful in developing their literacy skills. These reports can be assessed by teacher as well as peers in the class and the feedback can be used to improve the skills further. The students can also be made to present their case studies in the class.

The whole series of “Immigration Nation” can also be very beneficial in building the aspect of global education through its emphasis on the theme of ‘Interdependence and Globalisation’ (Education Services Australia, 2008) as it provides similar insights of other cultures in Australia. The series describes the lives of migrants who have influenced different sectors such as politics, food, communication, transport, agriculture, arts, design, sports, humanitarian etc. It is a very interactive website highlighting the contribution of people and groups from other countries to Australian heritage (CCS2.2- Board of Studies, NSW 2006, p.55). The website provides an option of creating a project by selecting videos or photos related to one of the particular themes listed above. This can be a very good opportunity for students to understand the diverse features of interdependence (Education Services Australia, 2008) and present them using technology.

1. Board of Studies, NSW (2006). Human society and its environment K-6. NSW: Author

2. Educational Services Australia (2008). Thinking globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom. AusAID: Author

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Stage 2 resources

Stage 2 resources | hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia | Scoop.it
Ritu Kapoor's insight:

This is a great resource provided by the Curriculum K-12 Directorate (NSW Department of Education & Communities) which can be used at stages 1, 2 & 3 in primary schools. The teaching ideas on page 74 can be adapted in terms of studying the contribution of Indian food in Australian cuisine as well as exploring the changes in eating habits of the community over a period of time. This aligns with the ‘change and continuity’ strand of Stage 2 – CCS2.2 (Board of Studies, NSW, 2006, p.54).

 The teacher can introduce the topic by asking students if they can name some of the Indian dishes they have eaten or heard of and if they have a strong likeness towards any dish in particular. The teacher can bring in some commonly used spices in Indian food and familiarise the students with it. The activity of comparing old and new cook books, magazines and recipe books can be adapted to see if there has been any Indian influence. A simple Indian dessert can be demonstrated by the teacher followed by a student’s discussion on the same.

Another activity can be where students research for the recipe of an Indian dish and write the recipe including the measured ingredients and compile all recipes of the students into a class resource book. This will also tap into the numeracy skills of the students as they familiarise with the various measurements. The resource book will help pupils achieve a sense of accomplishment and also strengthen cohesiveness in the class.

The teacher can also invite an owner of a local Indian restaurant (who has been in the business for a long time) to provide a historical viewpoint of how Indian cuisine has changed over the years in Australia in terms of its popularity, authenticity, culinary techniques, ingredients used etc.

This resource shows flexibility of adapting it for different cultures that have influenced Australian heritage and it is one of the most downloaded teaching resources from website of NSW Department of Education and Communities (Smyth, 2014).

 

1. Board of Studies, NSW (2006). Human society and its environment K-6. Board of Studies: NSW

2.  Smyth, C. (2014). EDMT5534 Human society and its environment, lecture 6, week 6: HSIE K-6 Outside the classroom.

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Indian cultural influence in Australia

Indian cultural influence in Australia | hsie stage 2 - Influence of Indian culture in australia | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago we told you how the government was trying to encourage kids to learn an Asian language. But part of that plan was to teach kids about Asian cultures too. Sarah met some Aussie kids who are getting involved in an Indian tradition that's bigger than you might think.
Ritu Kapoor's insight:

This is a very interesting video of children practicing Bollywood dancing in a training class. Apart from showing the influence of Indian culture in Australia, this can also help to generate a lot of excitement among the students because it has a fun element to it. The trainer talks about the expansion of Bollywood dancing in Australia and how the industry has helped promote Australia further on the world map by representing the scenic areas and icons of Australia in Bollywood. Bollywood style dancing is continuously expanding its roots in Australia involving the participation of a large chunk of Australian population who do not have an Indian origin.

The teacher can brainstorm in class about what is Bollywood dancing and why is it popular and what do the students like in the video. There can be discussion about students’ experiences of Bollywood dancing. After watching the individual interviews of dancers provided along the video, the students can discuss and write about what they like and dislike about Bollywood dancing; if they have ever watched a Bollywood movie then what was their opinion about it. Discussion can also be focussed around the notion of Bollywood dancing becoming increasingly popular in Australia and brainstorm the reasons for it. The students can compare and contrast it with any other dance form they know and write their reflections. This can be followed by a little Bollywood dancing activity with the teacher modelling some simple moves for the class. The students can be made to write a recount of the first time they watched an Indian/Bollywood dance which can be something they have watched in the past or based on this video. This can be extended for a fun activity day of Bollywood dancing and dress up day in the school for the students or an interclass Bollywood dancing competition in collaboration with other teachers.

This kind of group activity can be linked to one of the General Capabilities of “personal and social capability which involves students in a range of practices including recognising and regulating emotions, developing empathy for and understanding of others, establishing positive relationships, making responsible decisions, working effectively in teams and handling challenging situations constructively” (ACARA, 2014, p.116). It also helps in achieving intercultural understanding which is another important general capability listed in ACARA (2014, p.20). For further exploration this can be linked to the key learning area of ‘Creative Arts’.

 

1. Australian Curriculum Assessment & Reporting Authority (2014). The Australian Curriculum. Retreived from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

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