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Common Core gives new twist to US history - WND.com

Common Core gives new twist to US history - WND.com | American History Resources | Scoop.it
Common Core gives new twist to US history
WND.com
Leo Hohmann is a news editor for WND.
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Slavery is not ancient or irrelevant US history - Arizona Republic

Slavery is not ancient or irrelevant US history - Arizona Republic | American History Resources | Scoop.it
Arizona Republic
Slavery is not ancient or irrelevant US history
Arizona Republic
With a 235-year head start in North America, slavery is still legal in the United States. The Civil War will not start for another seven years.
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If America had compulsory voting, would Democrats win every election?

If America had compulsory voting, would Democrats win every election? | American History Resources | Scoop.it
CALL it the "no representation without taxation" shtick.Lexington has been in Pennsylvania this week (and Texas too, but that is for another day), looking at the...

 

The problem with projects and polls before an election is that they don't always factor in the likelihood that the person being polled will actually show up to the polls.  In Obama's first presidential run, a major part of his success was inspiring those would typically might not have voted to exercise their legal rights to vote.  Was that a one-time spike in interest or can that be duplicated?  Historically speaking, more conservatives will vote at a higher rate. 


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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | American History Resources | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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The New World

The New World | American History Resources | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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State senators question AP U.S. history changes - WBIR-TV

State senators question AP U.S. history changes - WBIR-TV | American History Resources | Scoop.it
WBIR-TV
State senators question AP U.S. history changes WBIR-TV Gresham and Bell said the new framework pushes a revisionist view of American history, with a negative interpretation of early American settlers and American involvement in World War...
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How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote

How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote | American History Resources | Scoop.it
Does your vote really count? Depends on which state you live in.

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West Wing - Why are we changing maps?

From season 2 - episode 16 "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail" It's "Big Block of Cheese" Day, which means that Leo sends grumbling sta...

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Voting age debated in S06e17 of The West Wing

"A Good Day" is episode 127 of The West Wing that aired first in march 2005. A group of middle school children who are part of the Future Leaders for Democra...

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | American History Resources | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote

How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote | American History Resources | Scoop.it
Does your vote really count? Depends on which state you live in.

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