American Government
490 views | +0 today
American Government
For Government Class
Curated by Sphs Jurgensen
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | American Government | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status

U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status | American Government | Scoop.it

For the first time in its history, the United States does not have a Protestant majority, according to a new study.

 

Interestingly, this is not due to the rise of a new religious group, but the rise of secularism in the United States. The fastest growing group in the United States is the religiously unaffliliated. Click here for a simplified AP news story on the report. 

 

Questions to ponder: What are some causal factors that might explain why there is an increase in the non-religious population in the United States today? How does this impact American culture and politics?

 

Tags: religion, USA, culture, unit 3 culture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, October 9, 2012 9:20 AM
And the report outlines that since 2010 (when the chart data ends) Protestants have continued to lose members.
Ali and bradyn's curator insight, December 1, 2013 1:14 PM

A religious article that shows U.S Protestants Lose Majority Status 

 
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from American History
Scoop.it!

How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote

How Someone Could Become President With Only 22 Percent Of The Popular Vote | American Government | Scoop.it
Does your vote really count? Depends on which state you live in.

Via Laura Fo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sphs Jurgensen
Scoop.it!

Who's On Top? Color-Coded Maps Rank States' Education Performance

Who's On Top? Color-Coded Maps Rank States' Education Performance | American Government | Scoop.it
Who's On Top?Color-Coded Maps Rank States' Education Performance...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Systems of Government by Country

Systems of Government by Country | American Government | Scoop.it
This map shows Systems of Government in the World.

 

This is an excellent tool for comparing political institutions around the world and analyzing regional difference between political systems at a global scale. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | American Government | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Biggest transnational companies

Biggest transnational companies | American Government | Scoop.it
THE giant American conglomerate General Electric (GE) holds more assets abroad than any other non-financial firm in the world—over $500 billion worth. Its foreign assets make up over 70% of its total.

 

While we may think of Volkswagen as a "German" company, 78% of their assets are in other countries. What advantages is there for companies to have operations in multiple countries? How do transnational corporations change the geographies of production, consumption and economics?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Redistricting

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Delainee Alysse Bushey's curator insight, April 27, 2017 5:00 PM
This video relates to what we are talking about in class, political geography, because it talks about gerrymandering. Gerrymandering deals with political geography because the people who make the district lines are politicians and district lines deals with geography. My opinion on this is that people use redistricting for their own good, so it can benefit them in the long run.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Understanding Poverty in the United States

Understanding Poverty in the United States | American Government | Scoop.it
Analysis of poverty in the USA: poor children rarely hungry; poor often have cable TV, air conditioning, a computer, and larger homes than non-poor Europeans.

 

This is an interesting series of bar graphs, pie charts and other data sets, all showing helping us to contextualize the life of the poor.  How is 'being poor' in the United States distinct from poverty in other regions of the world?  Is it fair to distinguish between the two?  How do you define poverty?  Is it a universal standard that is the same everywhere or is it a relation measure compared to others within the community? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 8:22 AM
i believe one of the major issues as was stated, is coming up with a true definition of poverty. The word should not be merely thrown around. A practical definition would include the ability to acquire your basic needs, food, shelter etc, all your necessities. I hate to break it to them, but cable tv, is not essential to daily life. Air conditioning is a thin line, depending on whether or not the person(s) require it due to medical conditions. Sure it is wonderful to have the internet and video game systems, but it doesn't make it unlivable to go without. As long as you have a decent living space with your bills paid and enough food to eat, you can hardly be considered poor.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The 9/11 Dilemma: Freedom vs. Security

KH: How has America changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001? We are still struggling to find a balance between saftey and civil liberties. The Patriot Act, prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, interrorgation techniques have all become parts of our lives.

The article asks the questions...

• Can the government listen to our phone conversations and read our  e-mails without warrants?

• Should suspected terrorists at the Guantánamo prison in Cuba have the right to challenge their detention in court?

• How much power does the president have to search for and punish those accused of having terrorist ties?

• Are harsh interrogation techniques ever justified? And at what point do they become torture?

 

Do you remember a time when you could board a plane with friends or family seeing you off from the gate? Do you remember bringing liquids though security? The youth of this country do not.  For more resources on September 11th, check out this scoop.it topic.


Via Ms. Harrington, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | American Government | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

Scooped by Sphs Jurgensen
Scoop.it!

Gerrymandering Explained

What Gerrymandering is and why it undermines democracy. *T-Shirts now for sale* Help support making more videos: http://goo.gl/1Wlnd From: http://blog.cgpgre...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from American History
Scoop.it!

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America | American Government | Scoop.it
It turns out our teachers, Hollywood and whoever we got our Thanksgiving mythology from (Big Turkey?) all made America's origin story far more boring than it actually was for some very disturbing reasons.

Via Laura Fo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from American History
Scoop.it!

Voting age debated in S06e17 of The West Wing

"A Good Day" is episode 127 of The West Wing that aired first in march 2005. A group of middle school children who are part of the Future Leaders for Democra...

Via Laura Fo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sphs Jurgensen
Scoop.it!

Where the Skills Are

Where the Skills Are | American Government | Scoop.it
The Atlantic covers news and analysis on politics, business, culture, technology, national, international and life on the official site of The Atlantic Magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states | American Government | Scoop.it
Non-Hispanic whites make up a dwindling share of the nation’s population, as their numbers drop in the Northeast and Midwest and grow slowly in the South and West.

 

A while back we looked at the changing demographics of black America, now it's time to look at the changes in white America. Why is this happening? What economic, cultural, demographic and political factors contribute to this pattern? What push factors and pull factors are at work?

 

Also, look at the interactive graphic, with mappable census data from the last 30 years, aggregated at the county level, or even block level. Link at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census/2010/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sphs Jurgensen
Scoop.it!

Measuring the Recession’s Toll

Measuring the Recession’s Toll | American Government | Scoop.it
Which states had the largest change in poverty rates and median household incomes from 2007 to 2010.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2008 Election maps

2008 Election maps | American Government | Scoop.it

Excellent electoral geography maps from the U.S. presidential election of 2008.  What are the major patterns you see?  What do these patterns in say about the politics, culture and demographics about these places?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Foreign Aid

The Geography of Foreign Aid | American Government | Scoop.it

This map is a graphical representation of the Dashboard’s available data on foreign assistance appropriations by fiscal year. The darker a country’s shading appears on the map, the more funding that U.S. Government country office received in that fiscal year. Users can switch between fiscal years by using the dropdown box in the top right corner of the page. Users can choose a country by clicking the map or by selecting the name of the country from the drop down box above.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers | American Government | Scoop.it
2010 Poverty Rate: 15.1%, 46.2 million people in poverty.

Here are the numbers behind the face of poverty in America.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | American Government | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

Alex Rodgers's curator insight, April 22, 2017 1:16 AM
This a great tool to connect to political geography. Interactive learning in my opinion is one of the best ways to learn. This allows for us to better understanding political cartography in a way that is both fun and helpful.
Austin Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2017 5:33 PM
This game is all about gerrymandering in Political Geography and the objective is to set boundaries for each district so that each has a similar population. This game really shows how difficult gerrymandering is and the process of getting the boundaries accepted.  
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System?

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System? | American Government | Scoop.it

"After growing by leaps and bounds for more than three decades, China’s economic growth has come to a halt, falling from around 12 percent in the second quarter of 2006 to 7.6 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Export-dependent manufacturing sector has been hard hit. The June HSBC Flash Purchasing Managers Index hit a seven-month low of 48.1, down from a final reading of 48.4 in May, the eighth consecutive month that the index has been below 50—the contraction threshold. Is this just a temporary pause, caused by a prolonged slow-down in the world economy or something more serious?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Graham Mulligan's comment, March 14, 2013 12:32 PM
I think the flag icon needs to be changed.
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City | American Government | Scoop.it
In a bid to reconcile strict gender-segregation laws with a desire to increase employment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" exclusively for female workers, Russian news agency RT reports.

 

The idea is mind-blowing to say the least.  More women would be able to be a part of the workforce and move freely about women-only cities in Saudi Arabia than they could in 'regular' cities. 

Question to ponder: would the implementation of this idea represent a cultural step forward for Saudi Arabia towards gender equality or would it be a step that further isolated women and is repressive?  What do you think of the idea given the ingrained gender norms of Saudi Arabia? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:49 AM

This women only city policy, has a lot in common with the racial segregation polices in the United States. In 1896, in Plessy v Ferguson the Supreme Court ruled that as long as the facilities for whites and blacks were equal, segregation was constitutionally permissible. The idea that facilities can be separate and equal is a fallacy. The dominate group will always be provided with the better facilities , because they have the economic and the social means to build a better facility. The less group will suffer do to a lack of political and economic means. This women only city will likely pale in comparison to the other cities of Saudi Arabia. True equality comes through integration, not separation.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:20 PM

this would 100% be a step back, that is the worst kind of segregation and "equality" did we not have this in the united states and it was scrapped shortly after because "separate is inherently not equal"

Christina Caruso's curator insight, March 31, 5:43 PM
In Saudi Arabia there is a bid to try to build a Women- Only City.  Yes that is talking about a gender. The gender- segregation laws desire to increase empolyment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" for female workers.