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Rescooped by tasaha from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Court rejects human trafficking claim by cannabis growhouse accused

Court rejects human trafficking claim by cannabis growhouse accused | american crime control | Scoop.it
A Chinese man arrested in a cannabis growhouse in Dublin will stand trial on drug charges after the High Court ruled that he is not a victim of human trafficking.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is an interesting case. I think it would be hard to prove whether he was a victim or not-he may have been allowed some tourist time before he had to start his debt duties. Needless to say, more than likely his claim was used in the hopes of getting out of being punished for his crime. It sounded like he was in more trouble for doing so thought…

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Isaac Peacock's comment, April 24, 2014 5:02 PM
I'll bet he regrets taking those pictures, but its possible that maybe he was just too trusting/naive or plain stupid and didnt know he could get away.
Sarita Spindler's comment, April 29, 2014 6:35 PM
I disagree with his viewpoint (shouldn't get convicted) even if he was the victim of human trafficking. The way he is acting, I believe he knew it was illegal to do, and knew there were consequences.
Delisa Chapman's comment, May 5, 2014 5:49 PM
This article was interesting. I agree with Tasaha about it being hard to prove whether or not he was a victim or human trafficking. However, I think he knew there were consequences for these actions and now he is hoping to get out of the punishment by making this claim.
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Two Alaska State Troopers killed in Tanana shooting

Two Alaska State Troopers killed in Tanana shooting | american crime control | Scoop.it
Two Alaska State Troopers were shot and killed in the line of duty Thursday in the Interior community of Tanana.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is a sad day indeed. My sympathies go out to their families.  

I read that there was one VSPO stationed in the village. I wonder if the VSPO would have been the first victim if carrying a firearm or if it would have diffused the situation before the officers arrived. I have a tendency to believe the former would have been the case, but I am curious to others opinion of the matter.  

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Rob Duke's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:18 PM

Sad, sad, day!

Ashley Roberts's comment, May 4, 2014 6:09 PM
Truly devastating. My sympathies go out to both of their families. This story is heartbreaking and so many were affected by this loss. Since my father is a retired Alaska State Trooper, I remember the fear I had every time he went to work. Those in Law Enforcement risk their lives every day to protect members of their communities. Since all of the details regarding this story have not come out yet, I am interested in hearing what led to this tragic decision.
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Pakistan cannibal brothers sent to police custody

Pakistan cannibal brothers sent to police custody | american crime control | Scoop.it
Two Pakistani brothers, arrested for alleged cannibalism, were today remanded to seven days in police custody by an anti-terrorism court

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This story just makes you go eewww!. On a positive note, they were already dead and perhaps their circumstances made them feel they had no alternatives. Then you wonder why they only got 2yrs for doing it in the past, why they did not receive further mental evaluation, and what it has to do with anti-terrorism. Finally, you then just go eeewwww again…  

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Rob Duke's curator insight, April 15, 2014 11:38 AM

This is an interesting one to watch....

kak57's comment, April 25, 2014 8:35 PM
this article is just disturbing. I'm also glad that the people they ate were already dead but it's still as disgusting. I also don't understand why they only got two years for it in the past. this is just gross.
Colby Wallace's comment, April 27, 2014 10:32 PM
This article was completely ridiculous. I can’t believe that they were able to dig up 150 bodies and eat them before they were caught. The fact they also ate a baby, is extremely worrying. The mental capacity to commit a crime such as this is not in my understanding. This is a brutal crime and how they were released after just serving a two year term is crazy.
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Boy, 14, shoots dad working two jobs dead on bus in Brooklyn

Boy, 14, shoots dad working two jobs dead on bus in Brooklyn | american crime control | Scoop.it
New York police say a 14-year-old boy opened fire on a city bus Thursday evening in Brooklyn, fatally shooting a passenger in the head.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

Although this is a very sad case, it exemplifies how a case could be politicized. Political figures could increase gun banning legislation or increase the age of capability due to cases such as this. It is too bad this poor man got caught in the crossfire, but it could very well not be the only one....

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Andrew Kelly's comment, March 25, 2014 2:33 PM
With this case, one thing surprised me - that there were no charges filed against the shooter. I do not really agree with the argument that the kid didn't intend to kill him and that a different legislature would help. This kid was 14 and he was firing his gun on a bus, so he probably didn't get the gun legally and he knew that if he fires the gun on a bus, there is a high chance that somebody is going to he shot. Even though he was 14, I think that he knew very well what he was doing and that it wasn't accident or that he didn't know what he was doing. If he is under-aged, should his parents be punished as well? Because they failed to raise him well and oversee him while being under-aged. I agree that more information would be helpful but I think that the kid should serve many and many years in a prison.
James Greer's comment, March 28, 2014 1:50 AM
I'm with Ricky on this -- he needs to be checked out, and we need to figure out why he did it. If it's a mental thing, then he deserves to get treatment and, if possible, put back into society without a black mark on his file making life impossible. If it wasn't mental, then we need to understand why he did it--and what can be done to prevent anyone else from doing this again for the same reasons. But what we shouldn't do is try to make decisions from a position of emotional vulnerability where logic isn't going to be used in any rational form.
kak57's comment, March 29, 2014 9:14 PM
With a case like this it seems like this boy had something mentally wrong with him. He shot an innocent man who wasn't his initial target; something that a mentally stable 14 year old boy wouldn't do. I'm thinking that something was mentally wrong with him and he needs to be examined and asked why he did this. He is old enough to understand what he was doing and understand why it was wrong.
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Babysitter pleads guilty, confesses to shaking New Jersey girl, 2, to death 

A New Jersey babysitter violently shook a 2-year-old girl and then left her to die so she could play on a Facebook game.

Sheila Polanski confessed to getting angry with tiny Madeline McHenry, who she said was whining, at the toddler's Gloucester City home on Jul. 5, 2011.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

Before opening this article, I expected the babysitter to be a young teen who may not understood her actions, but this was a grown woman. It sounded like the babysitter plea bargained to the lesser charge (hence the 12 yrs.). I agree that the parents should have done a little more homework, but at the same time, it is not a foolproof process. What a sad case indeed.

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Andrew Kelly's comment, March 25, 2014 2:49 PM
I agree that this lady wasn't young and inexperienced in any way, she had years of experience and she should have known better. The question is what the parents could do to prevent this. Maybe they should have required a clear background check, and a proof that she is mentally healthy and not taking any medication. Even though they should have done more homework, they got the highest recommendations for her and she probably looked as a great fit at first. I think that the babysitter should get more than 12 years in a prison, because not that she only killed the baby, but she also was acting like nothing was going on and she left the baby dying on the floor. She is either mentally ill and needs a professional help, or she needs to serve her time in the prison. The justice system should protect the society from individuals like her.
kak57's comment, March 29, 2014 9:07 PM
I agree that I thought this babysitter was going to be young and inexperienced and was surprised to find that she was older and had experience. A case like this is now going to cause parents, when looking for a babysitter, to think twice. Possibly even do a background check on people they don't know. This also causes me to be curious where the parents heard that she was a highly recommended babysitter. I think that she should get more than 12 years in prison.
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“I know Adam would have killed me” father of Sandy Hook shooter says

“I know Adam would have killed me” father of Sandy Hook shooter says | american crime control | Scoop.it
Short summary of story

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

He is probably right. Andy was a disturbed young man and the symptoms of mental illness were masked and overlooked. In a New Yorker article mentioned early today, Adams father stated that he had wished his son was never born. Sad, but I have to agree…

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Susanna's comment, March 12, 2014 1:05 AM
That sounds bad coming from a father but he might be right. Or without blaming anyone someone could have noticed that his behavior was changing and tried to do something about it? These are all If and maybe issues.
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A Lonely Boy In The Freezing Cold Without A Jacket. Watch People's Reaction.

A Lonely Boy In The Freezing Cold Without A Jacket. Watch People's Reaction. | american crime control | Scoop.it
Would you give John your jacket?

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I agree that it is an inspirational video. It goes to show how we react when we see it compared to how react when we hear it. It is much harder to ignore a child freezing next to you while you have on a jacket than it is to know that a child out there somewhere freezes while you stay warm in your parka.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 21, 2014 1:29 PM

A little Norway today.  Inspiring video.

Willow Weir's comment, February 23, 2014 5:34 PM
I think it is amazing how fast this video went viral I wonder how many people felt that this wouldn't happen in the US?
Delisa Chapman's comment, March 6, 2014 12:38 AM
I loved this video. I think it was very inspirational. I agree with tasaha about hoe we react when we see it compared to when we hear it.
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Child porn found at Missouri coach's home in girl's killing

Child porn found at Missouri coach's home in girl's killing | american crime control | Scoop.it
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — A police search of the southwest Missouri home of a middle-school football coach accused in a 10-year-old girl's kidnapping and death found child pornography and more than a dozen guns, according to search warrants released Friday.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

What a sad case this is. You wonder which system failed them the most…   

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Ashley Brevak's comment, February 23, 2014 11:00 PM
This is a horrible situation. It is a shame that they couldn’t get to her before she died. I don’t see how he could possibly get off in this situation; the witnesses had a great deal of information and the police found a great deal of evidence. It seems like a closed and shut case to me. I hope he gets the highest level of punishment the state of Missouri allows.
Delisa Chapman's comment, March 3, 2014 11:15 PM
This situation is really sad and it was a scary knowing that he took her in front of people. I think they have a solid case and they will have no trouble closing this case. I agree with Ashley's comment about hoping he gets the highest level of punishment.
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New Suspect Named in Disappearance of Sisters 39 Years Ago - NBC News

New Suspect Named in Disappearance of Sisters 39 Years Ago - NBC News | american crime control | Scoop.it
GAITHERSBURG, Maryland — Police on Tuesday named a 57-year-old former carnival ride operator as a person of interest in the case of two young sisters who dis...

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I have special interest in cold cases, so this article peaks my interest. There were not nearly as many cases of children abductions in the United States then as there are today and even more rare was the abduction of two at once, so it further interests me. Their disappearance  must have devastated the family.

There was so little information in the article though, it was hard to really establish any true opinion of the investigation but it is good that there are sparks of interest. Putting the man’s picture in the paper may be a problem though. It could lead to mental shortcut (heuristics) that end in false identification. A witness may identify him, but after almost 39 years, it would be hard to find it credible. 

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Tessa Butterfield's comment, February 13, 2014 11:21 PM
This article doesnt give much information but it amazes me that after all these years, we can still have suspects and hopefully find the criminal. But why would a suspect just now come up? After all these years, how come things are just appearing? It's amazing to me.
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India gang rape: Woman fighting for life after village elders order sickening punishment

India gang rape: Woman fighting for life after village elders order sickening punishment | american crime control | Scoop.it
The victim told the police that she “lost count” of the number of men who assaulted her throughout the night

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is a perfect example of how globalization and international appeal has brought such cultural atrocities to the forefront. Although there are some within that nation and culture who find this behavior acceptable, it is obvious by the arrest of the individuals involved that a national shift that aligns with global views exists. Whether it becomes dominant is left to question…

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kak57's comment, January 26, 2014 9:09 PM
It is a known fact that about every 2 minutes someone in America is raped. Now most of these rapes don't make headlines. But with an article like this one, I can understand why it made headlines in America. Our culture deems this as not okay and that the gang who did this to the women should be punished. It is just sad to see that in their culture or certain cultures rape is a way of punishment. I think the countries that allow this as a punishment realize the effects this has the victim. Survivors may think of committing suicide, they may get pregnant, or may get post traumatic stress disorder. I think countries need to look at the way they punish people. I think there could have been a better way to punish this woman. My last question I have is if her love couldn't have paid the money, would he have got the same punishment as her?
Susanna's comment, January 27, 2014 12:34 AM
I think it´s important that this kind of news hits Europe and America. Maybe with international help and support people can be given a new and more modern punishment system. At least I feel that it´s not right to treat women this way no matter the culture.
Robert Boutang's comment, January 31, 2014 5:38 AM
This is unbelievable. Hopefully India can be shamed enough to stop this kind of violence in their country. The punishment for these rapists who commit this terrible act should be very harsh and severe to deter this kind of violence.
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Wait, Justin Bieber Might Not Have Been Drag Racing After All?

Wait, Justin Bieber Might Not Have Been Drag Racing After All? | american crime control | Scoop.it
The police report concerning the incident claims the Biebs was driving a little below sixty miles an hour in a residential zone during his big race with Khalil, but apparently, the car rental company inserted a device into the vehicles that...

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I do not think that media of any sort, but particularly TMZ, is justified in defending an individuals criminal actions. Although not a fact based entity, TMZ is responsible for minimalizing behavior that remains criminal nevertheless. That being said, I would not doubt that they would defend their position as well...

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Emma Weyiouanna's comment, February 4, 2014 12:22 AM
Making mistakes and learning from them is part of growing up and when it comes to teens who get into trouble or get caught with speeding will learn from them. It shouldn't be a big deal with some of the headlines about Justin because there are more headlines that are not facts and just to have more attention going towards him. But he should really pay attention to the speed limit in residential areas..
Rob Duke's comment, February 4, 2014 2:26 AM
Perhaps the issue is whether or not he's being held accountable...
Sarita Spindler's comment, February 4, 2014 4:00 AM
I agree with the comments above; TMZ is not in a position to defend Justin or analyze his actions. Even though he may or may not have been "drag racing", he was still going way over the posted speed limit in a residential area and putting people in danger. His blood alcohol may have been lower than the legal limit, but that still does not make it okay that he had alcohol in his system in the first place (because he is a minor). I also do not believe they are in a position to make claims such as "it's like half a beer maybe.....hardly enough to impair anyone's driving abilities".
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Pardon Me, Mr. President?

Pardon Me, Mr. President? | american crime control | Scoop.it
By appointing an advocate for defendants' rights as the new pardon attorney, the Obama administration has signaled it is serious about commuting drug offenses.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I think that this is a good idea. 5000 individuals spending mandatory sentences for non-violent crimes while many who commit violent crimes receive less time needs to be reversed. The only problem that I could see is the need for increased reintegration efforts for those who are pardoned. The recidivism rates are very high. We would need to offer and make available services to those pardoned, as well as all who are released, in order for them to even have a chance of surviving on the outside.

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L.A. County deputies fatally shoot man by mistake

L.A. County deputies fatally shoot man by mistake | american crime control | Scoop.it
Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies mistakenly shot two hostages, killing one, earlier this week as the men fled a knife-wielding captor in West Hollywood, officials said Thursday.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is a rare, unfortunate incident. Surely there will be an investigation, but officers are only human…they reacted on instinct. They were wrong this time. Although at the cost of a life, these officers will have to live with this error for the rest of their lives. As a result of this incident and its coverage, perhaps training and procedures will be reevaluated and the public will realize they also have a duty to officers during incidents such as this.

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Shasta Pomeroy's comment, April 13, 2014 4:36 PM
This is a truly tragic accident. An incident like this, with everything happening in such a hectic manner at once, lead to a saddening end. The use of lethal force of officers is often questioned by others. Though what happened was tragic, it is hard not being an officer who was there what the scene had been like. The video news report said that not only did the individual John Winkler match the description given of the suspect but that he had also “run towards the cops”. With these two pieces combined it is very likely that the officers viewed him as the threat. I feel sad for the family, officers, friends, and all involved in this case as it is a truly tragic situation for all involved.
Susanna's comment, April 20, 2014 3:42 PM
Sad situation for the police and the victims. If only they would have had solid information of the situation and the assailant and all the victims. I think the police were just doing their job and everything just happened too fast. correct information might have saved the situation.
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Attempted murder charges against nine-month-old baby thrown out by Pakistan court

Attempted murder charges against nine-month-old baby thrown out by Pakistan court | american crime control | Scoop.it
A judge in Pakistan has thrown out charges of attempted murder against a nine-month-old baby on Saturday, lawyers said, after the infant appeared in court for a second time.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I found this an interesting article, in large part because the complaint was for the whole family. This would include the child, at least until they were scrutinized (and embarrassed) for it. Imagine if the US were to penalize a whole family for the crimes of one or two family members. Puts things in perspective…

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Willow Weir's comment, April 13, 2014 2:43 PM
Obviously the charge was ridiculous and hence the public outrage although the headlines made the charges very unclear. I would think a court system that charges a family like that would make the process inconsistent.
Susanna's comment, April 20, 2014 2:44 PM
Cultural differences are clear here. I don´t see anything like this happening in the US. It´s one thing to charge whole family but a baby? It´s a good thing that the judge threw the charges out. Don´t know how anyone could hold a baby responsible of these kinds of crimes.
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2 School Children Die in Mass China Poisoning | TIME

2 School Children Die in Mass China Poisoning | TIME | american crime control | Scoop.it
Authorities are unsure how rat poison was ingested

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

First, I would like to say that I was surprised that this even made the news. Not because it was not newsworthy, but because China is rigorous in restricting media and news. That being said, the article left me with more questions than answers. If the food was safe than how did they ingest the poison? Did they check the water? They say that there was no evidence of foul play, but how could that be the case unless the food or water was contaminated before entering the school?  

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Ricky Osborne's comment, March 24, 2014 1:48 AM
This is sad news to hear. Two young kindergarten girls lost their lives due to negligent handling of the school’s food. This negligence calls for a criminal investigation in which someone needs to be held accountable for what has transpired. Depending on the circumstances, capital punishment may need to be considered. This of course depends on whether or not such actions were predetermined or not. Hopefully the families will be able to cope with the loss of their children.
Andrew Kelly's comment, March 25, 2014 2:37 PM
I agree that this article didn't provide much information at all. If the food was safe, how did they get poisoned? I agree that one of the possibilities was water, but how would that get into water? Also, the food while cooked was safe, but maybe somebody put the rat poison on individual plates or somehow on silverware. I agree that someone has to be held accountable for this, but with the limited set of information, the question is who...
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30-year-old cold case solved in California after suspect commits suicide

30-year-old cold case solved in California after suspect commits suicide | american crime control | Scoop.it
A cold case murder suspect identified through fingerprint and DNA evidence was found dead days after learning that he'd been linked to the crime.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

It is funny how many people, who commit crimes such as this, can live with that crime until they get caught. That is what takes them over the edge…not committing a crime but getting caught for a crime they committed. I am glad that science has come as far as it has. Perhaps DNA evidence will deter crime to an extent.

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Ricky Osborne's comment, March 9, 2014 7:52 PM
30 years is a long time for a case to finally be solved. Its good to see that today's technologies are helping us to reexamine evidence of cold cases. Such allows for the discovery or new evidence which may lead to solving the case. The perpetrator in this case was allowed to be free for 30 years. He will never have to face any sort of punishment due to the fact that he took his own life. Justice in this case was not served. Hopefully the family of the victim can now find closure.
Ashley Brevak's comment, March 10, 2014 1:17 PM
This is amazing. I’m glad they finally found the person who killed this woman. I think it’s rare for them to crack cold cases so; this is a huge break through. I agree with Hathaway in his note basically saying that he took the coward way out. He certainly did. That is a long time to pass from the point of the crime being committed and his death (from the age of 17-48). It shows how far we’ve come with forensic science. I’m glad that her family (if she has any right now) may have closure. It’s a shame that he committed suicide but at least he’s gone in some way.
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Convicted Murderer of 7 Wins $500K Lawsuit

Convicted Murderer of 7 Wins $500K Lawsuit | american crime control | Scoop.it
The man convicted of perpetrating one of the most gruesome and notorious mass killings in Chicago area history has been awarded nearly a half million dollars in a civil lawsuit against a prison guard accused of punching him in the face.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is an interesting turn of events. I agree with one of the last comments that state that if a broken jaw was worth that, what were 7 lives worth…but, at the same time believe that everyone imprisoned has the right not to be treated cruelly or inhumanly. Although this criminal did not give his victims the same right, the US constitution guarantees all who are incarcerated this right.   

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Isaac Peacock's comment, March 13, 2014 2:23 AM
I agree with Tasha and find it ironic and satisfying that he will never live to use that money.
Zach White's comment, March 18, 2014 6:55 AM
I disagree with both of y'all. A broken jaw sucks, but it isn't inhumane. Metal plates suck, and being beat sucks, but I suppose being murdered sucks a whole lot more. He's a criminal. He ought not to have rights.
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Fairbanks man gets 18 years in cocaine trafficking case

Fairbanks man gets 18 years in cocaine trafficking case | american crime control | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS - A federal judge on Friday sentenced a man described by prosecutors as being the largest cocaine distributor in Fairbanks to 18 years in prison.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

 

I’m sorry, but I find this sentence excessive. People have spent less time in prison for murder. I am an advocate for change in the drug laws and sentences in this nation.

 

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Ricky Osborne's comment, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM
Cocaine is a serious hard drug that causes so many negative consequences within a community. This operation that was carried out by this group not only affected their community of Anchorage, but also all of Alaska. 18 years seems to be too lenient a sentence as the lives affected by such an operation seems to demand a harsher punishment.
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Two sisters of Iowa state representative found dead in Pittsburgh home

Two sisters of Iowa state representative found dead in Pittsburgh home | american crime control | Scoop.it
Two sisters of an Iowa state representative were found murdered in their Pittsburgh home, and police are investigating the case as a double homicide, cops said.

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

This is a sad, but interesting case. Although the two were sisters of a state representative and of course every avenue would be exhausted to consider this link in the killings, I would just as interested in whether there was a link to one of the sister’s jobs at the psychiatric hospital. Since there was no forced entry, I would consider the latter a more viable option.

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Secret plan to put remote kill switch in every European car revealed

Secret plan to put remote kill switch in every European car revealed | american crime control | Scoop.it
The end of police chases?

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I really liked the idea of this at first, just due simply to the lives that it would save, but after initial thought, it could give police too much power, at least in this country. I am surprised that the notion was a secret, since many cars are equipped with the technology and police have the resources to access that technology. I wonder whether the transport police, constables, or provincial force would have ultimate control in enforcing such a plan.

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Robert Boutang's comment, February 13, 2014 3:21 AM
Great idea. This will save many lives including the law enforcement officers. Many of innocent people get caught in the middle of these high-speed chases and get hurts or die. I wonder if this technology will ever happen in our lifetime. Hopefully motorcycles will be included.<br><br>
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Exposing the Textbook Scam: How to Save Us from Economists | The Business Desk with Paul Solman | PBS NewsHour | PBS

Exposing the Textbook Scam: How to Save Us from Economists | The Business Desk with Paul Solman | PBS NewsHour | PBS | american crime control | Scoop.it
Exposing the Textbook Scam: How to Save Us from Economists

Via Rob Duke
tasaha's insight:

I think that statistics and economists can be a tool that can be used and abused. Economists often take out the human element of the equation and use statistics to support it. I think that the different perspective is refreshing. The last statistics book I read blamed lower crime rates on abortion. What then, is to account, for the concurrent high incarceration rate?

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Rob Duke's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:44 PM

Finally, an econ textbook that takes a more critical look....