Amazon Rainforest Conservation
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Amazon forest more resilient to climate change than feared

Amazon forest more resilient to climate change than feared | Amazon Rainforest Conservation | Scoop.it

The Amazon rainforest is less vulnerable to die off because of global warming than widely believed because the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide also acts as an airborne fertilizer, a study showed on Wednesday.

 

The boost to growth from CO2, the main gas from burning fossil fuels blamed for causing climate change, was likely to exceed damaging effects of rising temperatures this century such as drought, it said.

 

"I am no longer so worried about a catastrophic die-back due to CO2-induced climate change," Professor Peter Cox of the University of Exeter in England told Reuters of the study he led in the journal Nature. "In that sense it's good news."


Via Sam Radcliffe
Sydney Huang's insight:

I.D. The Amazon rainforest is less vulnerable to die off.

 

S.D. The Amazon rainforest is less vulnerable to die off because of global warming than widely believed because the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide also acts as an airborne fertilizer.

S.D. The boost to growth from CO2, the main gas from burning fossil fuels blamed for causing climate change, was likely to exceed damaging effects of rising temperatures this century such as drought, it said.

 

 

 

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Amazon rainforest more able to withstand drought than previously thought « New Phoenix

Amazon rainforest more able to withstand drought than previously thought « New Phoenix | Amazon Rainforest Conservation | Scoop.it

New research suggests that the Amazon rainforest may be more able to cope with dry conditions than previously predicted. Researchers at the University of Exeter and Colorado State University used a computer model to demonstrate that, providing forest conservation measures are in place, the Amazon rainforest may be more able to withstand periods of drought than has been estimated by other climate models.

 

Many climate models over predict the water stress plants feel during the dry season because they don’t take into account the moisture that the forest itself can recycle in times of drought. In this study, published in the Journal of Climate, the researchers removed unrealistic water stress from their model and found that the moisture that is recycled by the forest is sufficient to reduce the intensity of drought conditions.

 


Via Mariaschnee
Sydney Huang's insight:

 I.D. The Amazon Rainforest may be able to cope with the dry conditions if they provided forest conservaton measures.

 

S.D. The Amazon Rainforest have suffered from drought in the previous years.

S.D.  The rainforest may be able to withstand the periods of drought than has been estimated by other climate models.

 

I.D. Many climate models over perdict the water stress plants feel during the dry season but the Journal of Climate has removed unrealistic water stress from their models.

 

S.D. The climate models think that the water stress plants feel during the dry season beacause they dont take into account the moisture that the forest itself can recycle in times of drought.

S.D. Research shows that the moisture that is recycled by the forest is the sufficient to reduce the intensity of drought conditons.

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Amazon Rainforest is ‘at Higher Risk of Tree Loss’ than ever before due to Global Warming

Amazon Rainforest is ‘at Higher Risk of Tree Loss’ than ever before due to Global Warming | Amazon Rainforest Conservation | Scoop.it
Part of the Amazon rainforest may be more vulnerable to the effects of climate change than first thought, say researchers.

 

Findings showed that since 1979, the dry season lasted about a week longer in each decade. At the same time, the annual fire seasons have become longer. The most likely explanation for the increasingly longer dry seasons is global warming.

 

If the damage is severe enough, they say the loss of rainforest could cause the release of large volumes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, and could also disrupt plant and animal communities in one of the world’s most biodiversity-rich regions, as outlined in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

 

The team used ground-based rainfall measurements from the past three decades. Findings showed that since 1979, the dry season in southern Amazonia lasted about a week longer in each decade.

 

Professor Fu and her colleagues say the water stored in the forest soil at the end of each wet season is all that the trees have to last them through the dry months. The longer that lasts – regardless of how wet the wet season was – the more stressed the trees become and the more susceptible they are to forest fires.

 

They say the most likely explanation for the lengthening dry season in recent decades is human-caused greenhouse warming, which inhibits rainfall in two ways: It makes it harder for warm, dry air near the surface to rise and freely mix with cool, moist air above; and it blocks incursions by cold weather fronts from outside the tropics which could trigger rainfall.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sydney Huang's insight:

I.D. The amazon rainforest may be losing trees due to dry seasons.

 

S.D. It was shown that in 1979, the dry season lasted about a week londer in each deacade.

S.D. The most likely explanation for these dry seasons is global warming.

 

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