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World’s fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second
What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? For example, the lasers used at INRS produce ultrashort pulses in the femtosecond range (10-15s) that are far too short to visualize. Although some measurements are possible, not...
Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
Researchers at MIT have created what may be the smallest robots yet that can sense their environment, store data, and even carry out computational tasks. These devices, which are about the size of a human egg cell, consist of tiny electronic circuits made of two-dimensional materials, piggybackin...
Beyond Limits - How the internet is becoming a part of us
For Professor Yuval Noah Harari from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the merging of man and machine will be the “greatest evolution in biology.”
 
“I think it is likely in the next 200 years or so Homo sapiens will upgrade themselves into some idea of a divine being, either through biological...
Killer cell immunotherapy offers potential cure for advanced pancreatic cancer
A new approach to treating pancreatic cancer using 'educated killer cells' has shown promise, according to early research by Queen Mary University of London.  
The new cell-based immunotherapy, which has not yet been tested in humans with pancreatic cancer, led to mice being completely cancer-fre...
Designer proteins activate fluorescent molecules
A method for designing β-barrels that bind to any small molecule.  
Proteins are the molecular machines of life: they carry out the complex molecular processes required by cells with unrivalled accuracy and efficiency. Many of these processes depend on proteins having the ability to bind specific...
Novel design could help shed excess heat in next-generation fusion power plants
A class exercise at MIT, aided by industry researchers, has led to an innovative solution to one of the longstanding challenges facing the development of practical fusion power plants: how to get rid of excess heat that would cause structural damage to the plant.   The new solution was made po...
New nanotechnology breakthrough uses atmospheric carbon to make useful chemicals
Burning fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas releases carbon into the atmosphere as CO2 while the production of methanol and other valuable fuels and chemicals requires a supply of carbon. There is currently no economically or energy efficient way to collect CO2 from the atmosphere and use i...
DNA Forensics: Even if you’ve never taken a DNA test, a distant relative’s could reveal your iden...
The genetic sleuthing approach that broke open the Golden State Killer case could potentially be used to identify more than half of Americans of European descent from anonymous DNA samples, according to a provocative new study that highlights the unintended privacy consequences of consumer geneti...
Surgery Robot Remotely Hacked by Computer Science Experts
Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have demonstrated the ability to remotely hack a research surgical robot, the RAVEN II platform.   Before continuing, I'll stop to clarify one thing. The RAVEN II is not a clinically used surgical robot like, say, the Da Vinci surgical robot....
Model helps robots to navigate more like humans do
When moving through a crowd to reach some end goal, humans can usually navigate the space safely without thinking too much. They can learn from the behavior of others and note any obstacles to avoid. Robots, on the other hand, struggle with such navigational concepts.
 
MIT researchers have now d...
Genome wide association analyses in type 2 diabetes: The gift that keeps on giving
Recently, Nature Genetics published the latest iteration of a series of genome wide association analysis for type 2 diabetes that has been compiled (as the DIAGRAM consortium) over the past decade. Genome-wide association data from nearly 900,000 individuals from 32 studies, focusing on individua...
The experience of mathematical beauty and its neural correlates in the brain
The beauty of mathematical formulas lies in abstracting, in simple equations, truths that have universal validity. Many—among them the mathematicians Bertrand Russell (1919) and Hermann Weyl (Dyson, 1956; Atiyah, 2002), the physicist Paul Dirac (1939) and the art critic Clive Bell (1914)—have wri...
Ants regulate growth of seemingly 'useless' organ to make huge soldiers
Scientists have found the answer to a question that perplexed Charles Darwin. So much so, that it actually led him to doubt his own theory of evolution. He wondered, if natural selection works at the level of the individual, fighting for survival and reproduction, how can a single colony produce ...
Never forget a face? Research suggests people know an average of 5,000 faces
For the first time scientists have been able to put a figure on how many faces people actually know- a staggering 5,000 on average.   The research team, from the University of York, tested study participants on how many faces they could recall from their personal lives and the media, as well as ...
Planned intermittent fasting may reverse type 2 diabetes, small study suggests
Planned intermittent fasting may help to reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports after three patients in their care, who did this, were able to cut out the need for insulin treatment altogether.   Around one in 10 people in the US and Canada have type 2 di...
What is directed evolution and why did it win the chemistry Nobel prize?
The 2018 chemistry Nobel prize was awarded for putting the power of evolution into chemists’ hands. Frances Arnold was recognized for inventing directed enzyme evolution, while George Smith and Gregory Winter received the prize for discovering how to get bacteria to make proteins to order. What i...
Viruses discern, destroy E. coli in drinking water | Cornell Chronicle
To rapidly detect the presence of E. coli in drinking water, Cornell food scientists now can employ a bacteriophage – a genetically engineered virus – in a test used in hard-to-reach areas around the world. Rather than sending water samples to laboratories and waiting days for results, this new t...
A cartography of consciousness – researchers map where subjective feelings are located in the body
“How do you feel?” is a simple and commonly asked question that belies the complex nature of our conscious experiences. The feelings and emotions we experience daily consist of bodily sensations, often accompanied by some kind of thought process, yet we still know very little about exactly how th...
Nanoparticles offer extensive new cure for snakebites
Engineered nanoparticles that bind toxins in snake venom could provide an effective means to treat dermonecrosis caused by many species of venomous snake.
 
Envenoming from snakes is a global problem that affects over two million people and kills 100,000 each year. The current treatment for snake...
Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
The vast majority of computing devices today are made from silicon, the second most abundant element on Earth, after oxygen. Silicon can be found in various forms in rocks, clay, sand, and soil. And while it is not the best semiconducting material that exists on the planet, it is by far the most ...
Shark genomes provide insights into elasmobranch evolution and the origin of vertebrates
Modern cartilaginous fishes are divided into elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) and chimaeras, and the lack of established whole-genome sequences for the former has prevented our understanding of early vertebrate evolution and the unique phenotypes of elasmobranchs.
 
Scientists now present ...
Smuggling a CRISPR gene editor into staph bacteria can kill the pathogen
  Bits of DNA that make bacteria dangerous can be co-opted to bring the microbes down instead. Stretches of DNA called pathogenicity islands can jump between bacteria strains, introducing new toxin-producing genes that usually make a strain more harmful.
 
Scientists have now modified pathogen...
Novel technology enables detection of early-stage lung cancer when surgical cure still is possible
 Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is often fatal because most cases are not diagnosed until they are so advanced that surgical intervention is no longer possible. To improve outcomes researchers are developing a blood test to detect lung cancer earlier in the disease.
 
A report in The Journ...
Genetics research 'biased towards studying white Europeans'
In a recent study, published in Psychiatric Genetics, scientists found that a commonly used genetic test to predict schizophrenia risk gives scores that are 10 times higher in people with African ancestry than those with European ancestry. This is not because people with African ancestry actually...
Guided by CRISPR, Prenatal Gene Editing Shows Proof-of-Concept in Treating Congenital Disease bef...
For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. Published today in Nature Medicine, research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univer...
Whale songs evolve, but calls persist for several generations
Since 1971, when Roger Payne and Scott McVay first described the “surprisingly beautiful sounds” made by humpback whales in the journal Science – at the same time inventing the term whale songs – people have been fascinated by the vocalizations of whales. Humpback whales were the first species kn...
Study finds that the Global sea level could rise 50 feet by the year 2300
  According to a new ground breaking study, the global average sea level could rise up to eight feet by the year 2100 and up to fifty feet by 2300. The study suggests if we can’t control the uprising greenhouse gas emissions, it will pose a major risk to coastal ecosystems around the globe. The r...
Harvesting solar fuels through a bacterium’s unusual appetite for gold
A bacterium named Moorella thermoacetica won’t work for free. But UC Berkeley researchers have figured out it has an appetite for gold. And in exchange for this special treat, the bacterium has revealed a more efficient path to producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis.
 
M. thermoa...
The Stuff that Exoplanets Are Made of
Researchers have analyzed the composition and structure of far-away exoplanets using statistical tools. Their analysis indicates whether a planet is earth-like, made up of pure rock or a water-world. The larger the planet, the more hydrogen and helium surround it.   Is there a second Earth out t...
Gene therapy breakthrough in treating rare form of blindness
The world’s first gene therapy trial for a genetic cause of blindness known as choroideremia has shown positive results. The trial, supported by NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), began in 2011 at the Oxford Eye Hospital, part of the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.
 
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A new way to manufacture small batches of biopharmaceuticals on demand using Pichia pastoris
MIT researchers have developed a new way to rapidly manufacture biopharmaceuticals on demand. Their system can be easily reconfigured to produce different drugs, enabling flexible switching between products as they are needed. "Traditional biomanufacturing relies on unique processes for each new ...
Symbiotic star AG Pegasi observed after ourburst
Using ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, two researchers have observed the symbiotic star AG Pegasi after the end of its outburst in 2015. The observations, detailed in a paper published September 24 on the arXiv pre-print server, could reveal the real nature of this peculiar object.   AG Pegas...
Astronomers use Earth's natural history as guide to spot vegetation on new exoworlds
By looking at Earth's full natural history and evolution, astronomers may have found a template for vegetation fingerprints - borrowing from epochs of changing flora - to determine the age of habitable exoplanets. "Our models show that Earth's vegetation reflectance signature increases with cover...
For the first time, astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of Sun-like stars
Sun-like stars rotate up to two and a half times faster at the equator than at higher latitudes, a finding by researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi that challenges current science on how stars rotate.
Until now, little was known about the precise rotational patterns of Sun-like stars, only that the equato...
Amazing Science: Most Popular Postings
Your ultimate online portal to the future as well as looking up the past. Reporting on what's new and what's next in technology, science, gadgets, astronomy, physics, math, green tech and much more. We are aggregating science news from over 1,600 international news sources and select the best sci...
2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to two Cancer Immunotherapy Researchers
The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded on Monday to James P. Allison of the United States and Tasuku Honjo of Japan for their work on unleashing the immune system’s ability to attack cancer, a breakthrough in developing new cancer treatments.
 
Dr. Allison and Dr. Honjo, worki...
Robots partnering up: Working toward partner-aware humanoid robot control
Researchers at the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) have recently proposed a coupled-dynamics formalism and a new approach for exploiting helpful interactions with humanoid robots. Their paper, which was pre-published on arXiv, also presents a number of task-based, partner-aware techniques f...
Scientists discover a very rare mechanism for ALL to relapse after CAR T cell therapy
A single leukemia cell, unknowingly engineered with the leukemia-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) lentivirus and infused back into a patient, was able to reproduce and cause a deadly recurrence of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). New research from the Abramson Cancer Center of ...
Three new species of fish discovered from the ultra deep of the Pacific
Three new species of fish discovered in the extreme depths of the Pacific Ocean.  
An exploration to one of the deepest places on earth has captured rare footage of what is believed to be three new species of the elusive Snailfish. Involving a team of 40 scientists from 17 different nations, incl...
A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin | RIKEN
Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. Previously, they developed a flexible photovoltaic cell that could be incorporated into textiles. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, ca...
VLA Discovers Powerful Jet Coming from "Wrong" Kind of Star
The VLA's discovery of a jet of material launched from a highly-magnetic neutron star has forced rethinking a longstanding theory.  
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have discovered a fast-moving jet of material propelled outward from a typ...
Researchers teach computers to see optical illusions
By making a neural-network computer model that can be fooled by optical illusions like humans, the researchers advanced knowledge of the human visual system and may help improve artificial vision.  
Optical illusions can be fun to experience and debate, but understanding how human brains perceive...
How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine
All machines convert one form of energy into another form - for example a car engine turns the energy stored in fuel into motion energy. Those processes of energy conversion, described by the theory called thermodynamics, don’t only take place on the macro-level of big machines, but also at the m...
A population of unique basal progenitor cells (p63+ KRT7+ Claudin18-) located at the gastroesopha...
Researchers have identified cells in the upper digestive tract that can give rise to Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer.  
The discovery of this "cell of origin" promises to accelerate the development of more precise screening tools and therapies for Barrett's esophagus and eso...
New cool polymer paint could save on air conditioning
Air conditioning accounts for 10% of global energy consumption. Now researchers at Columbia University and Argonne National Laboratory in the US have produced a polymer “paint” capable of cooling surfaces to around 6 °C below ambient temperatures without using any energy at all. Used in combinati...
How long does a quantum jump take?
Quantum jumps are usually regarded to be instantaneous. However, new measurement methods are so precise that it has now become possible to observe such a process and to measure its duration precisely -- for example the famous 'photoelectric effect', first described by Albert Einstein.   It was o...
Matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light
A UK team of astronomers report the first detection of matter falling into a black hole at 30% of the speed of light, located in the center of the billion-light year distant galaxy PG211+143. The team, led by Professor Ken Pounds of the University of Leicester, used data from the European Space A...
The world’s largest bird that ever walked the surface of Earth – Vorombe titan
Madagascar’s giant elephant birds receive bone-afide rethink as ZSL names the species.   After decades of conflicting evidence and numerous publications, scientists at international conservation charity ZSL’s Institute of Zoology, have finally put the ‘world’s largest bird’ debate to rest. Publis...
Peculiar Octonion Math Could Underlie the Physics of Particles
New findings are fueling an old suspicion that fundamental particles and forces spring from strange eight-part numbers called “octonions.” Cohl Furey, a mathematical physicist at the University of Cambridge, is finding links between the Standard Model of particle physics and the octonions, number...
10 billion times stronger than steel: Nuclear pasta inside neutron stars may be the strongest mat...
A strand of spaghetti snaps easily, but an exotic substance known as nuclear pasta is an entirely different story.Predicted to exist in ultradense dead stars called neutron stars, nuclear pasta may be the strongest material in the universe. Breaking the stuff requires 10 billion times the force n...
How math helps explain the delicate patterns of dragonfly wings
The dainty veins gracing the wings of dragonflies and other insects are like fingerprints: Each wing displays a distinct pattern. A randomized mathematical process may help explain how certain thin filaments, called secondary veins, form these complex patterns, a new study finds.
 
Insect wings c...
What makes a mammal a mammal? Our spine, say scientists
Mammals are unique in many ways. We're warm-blooded and agile in comparison with our reptilian relatives.But a new study, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and led by Harvard University researchers Stephanie Pierce and Katrina Jones, suggests we're unique in one more way -- the make...
Genomic Study of 412 Anthrax Strains Provides New Virulence Clues
By analyzing genomic sequences from more than 400 strains of the bacterium that causes anthrax, researchers have provided the first evidence that the severity – technically known as virulence – of  specific strains may be related to the number of copies of certain plasmids they carry. Plasmids ar...
‘Robotic Skins’ turn everyday objects into robots
When you think of robotics, you likely think of something rigid, heavy, and built for a specific purpose. New “Robotic Skins” technology developed by Yale researchers flips that notion on its head, allowing users to animate the inanimate and turn everyday objects into robots.
 
Developed in the l...
Never-before-seen features found around a nearby neutron star
An unusual infrared light emission from a nearby neutron star detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope could indicate new features never before seen. One possibility is that there is a dusty disk surrounding the neutron star; another is that there is an energetic wind coming off the object and s...
All of NASA's missions
Learn more about space missions—past, present, and future.
The Military Now Has Tooth Microphone (Molar Mic) For Invisible, Hands-Free Radio Calls
The future of battlefield communications is resting comfortably near your back gums.   Next time you pass someone on the street who appears to be talking to themselves, they may literally have voices inside their head…and be a highly trained soldier on a dangerous mission. The Pentagon has inked...
Japanese mini-rovers from Hayabusa-2 send back their first images as they hop around happily on a...
A Japanese spacecraft has dropped two small rovers onto the surface of an asteroid zooming through space. The unmanned Hayabusa-2 is the first spacecraft to ever successfully place robotic rovers onto an asteroid.   Japan’s space agency (JAXA) hopes that the mission will provide clues about the o...
RemoveDEBRIS: UK Satellite Is The First To Clean Up Space Junk
A British satellite has become the first ever to clear up some space junk, using its onboard net technology. The aptly named RemoveDEBRIS satellite, built by a consortium of space companies and research institutions led by the Surrey Space Centre, released a video of its experimental phase of ope...
The Dawn of Twitter and the Age of Awareness
WHEN IT CAME into being in 2006, Twitter seemed perplexing. Publishing teensy, 140-character updates? Whatever was that good for? Twitter seemed like a ghastly mashup of the preening narcissism and nanosecond attention spans that defined the worst trends in digital culture. Tim Ferriss, writer of...
Researchers to Release Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in Africa for First Time
The government of Burkina Faso granted scientists permission to release genetically engineered mosquitoes anytime this year or next, researchers announced Wednesday. It’s a key step in the broader efforts to use bioengineering to eliminate malaria in the region.
 
The release, which scientists ar...
Engineers develop the first method for controlling nanomotors
In a breakthrough for nanotechnology, engineers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed the first method for selecting and switching the mechanical motion of nanomotors among multiple modes with simple visible light as the stimulus.   The capability of mechanical reconfiguration co...
Optical detection of picomolar concentrations of RNA using switches in plasmonic chirality
Even tiny amounts of viruses can have disastrous consequences. RNA identification can reveal the type of virus present. A fast and sensitive technique based on optical detection has now been outlined in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Scientists from Germany and Finland have demonstrated the bindi...
Self-flying glider 'learns' to soar like a bird
Scientists have created a self-flying glider that uses machine learning to navigate rising air currents, in an experiment that could help our understanding of how birds migrate.   Soaring birds ride warm air passages known as thermals to fly and gain height without needing to flap their wings, al...
Gut bacteria’s shocking secret: They produce electricity
Electrogenic ability may be important in how bacteria infect humans, or in how they ferment cheese and yogurt,
 
While bacteria that produce electricity have been found in exotic environments like mines and the bottoms of lakes, scientists have missed a source closer to home: the human gut. Unive...
Scientists Create Method to Map Vast Unknown Territory of Long Non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs)
Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have come up with a sequence motif-based strategy for sorting out functional similarities between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The authors of the study described their "sequence evaluation from k-mer representation" (SEEKR) metho...
Scuba spider uses web as gill to breathe underwater
Using its web as a gill, the diving-bell spider can live underwater with only occasional visits to the surface. The arachnid (Argyroneta aquatica) breathes air from a bubble that it grabs from the surface of water using fine hairs on its abdomen. The spider traps the air within a bell-shaped silk...
Genetic testing could pick out people at three-fold increased risk of bone marrow cancer
Assessing DNA for areas of the genome linked to cancer risk could pick out some people with a three-fold increased risk of blood cancer, a new study suggests. The research identified six new DNA regions linked to a higher risk of multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells made in the bone ma...
Russian android robot F.e.d.o.r to acquire self-learning abilities
The Russian android robot called F.e.d.o.r (Fedor) can do the splits and screw in a light bulb, CEO of Android Technics Research and Production Association Alexander Permyakov told TASS recently. Android Technics is the developer of the robot Fedor. The chief executive confirmed that the robot co...
Novel flying robot mimics rapid insect flight almost perfectly
A novel insect-inspired flying robot, developed by TU Delft researchers from the Micro Air Vehicle Laboratory (MAVLab), has been presented in Science (14 September 2018). Experiments with this first autonomous, free-flying and agile flapping-wing robot – carried out in collaboration with Wagening...
The story of moonshine symmetry, number theory, and the monster
In 1978, the mathematician John McKay noticed what seemed like an odd coincidence. He had been studying the different ways of representing the structure of a mysterious entity called the monster group, a gargantuan algebraic object that, mathematicians believed, captured a new kind of symmetry. M...
AI algorithm teaches a car to drive from scratch in 20 minutes
A pair of artificial intelligence Ph.Ds from Cambridge University are going all-in on machine learning as the foundation of autonomous cars. Their company, Wayve, has just released video of a kitted-out Renault Twizy teaching itself to follow a lane from scratch, over the course of about 20 minut...
A massive net is being deployed to pick up plastic in the Pacific
  The days of the great Pacific garbage patch may be numbered. A highly anticipated project to scoop up plastic from the massive pool of ocean debris is poised to launch its first phase from Alameda, Calif., on September 8. The creators of the project, called the Ocean Cleanup, say their syste...
A new hydrogen-rich compound may be a record-breaking superconductor
Two studies report evidence of superconductivity — the transmission of electricity without resistance — at temperatures higher than seen before. The effect appears in compounds of lanthanum and hydrogen squeezed to extremely high pressures. All known superconductors must be chilled to function, w...