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Design for Fingers and Thumbs Instead of Touch

Design for Fingers and Thumbs Instead of Touch | AMAZING Design | Scoop.it

Now we know that accuracy is related to position on the screen. … So we can’t simply create designs, then uniformly account for target and interference sizes or avoid putting targets in certain areas of the screen.

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I Fresh – Scanner For Food Freshness

I Fresh – Scanner For Food Freshness | AMAZING Design | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
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Deloste's curator insight, November 12, 2013 9:29 AM

 by Yang Fei, Chen Xiaofeng & Sun Yingjie

Richard Platt's curator insight, November 12, 2013 12:59 PM

Scanners for freshness of fodd, about time, my milk didn't go bad before I used it all up

Osku Penttinen's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:58 PM

With only three of us eating, our fridge has a moderate turn over in food. But there are always packages and jars that are lost at the back of the fridge which no one can remember when they were put there. If it works, this is a great idea to help avoid health issues from very out of date food.

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10 More Amazing Science Stunts (3)

Visit https://twitter.com/RichardWiseman Music by http://www.youtube.com/user/ElectricUnicycleCrew.
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New Trick Produces Whole Wafers of Perfectly Aligned Nanowires

New Trick Produces Whole Wafers of Perfectly Aligned Nanowires | AMAZING Design | Scoop.it

Korean researchers use semiconductor manufacturing processes rather than chemical synthesis to build better nanowires faster.

 

Nanowires don’t quite get the recognition that their high-profile nanomaterial cousins carbon nanotubes and graphene receive. But nanowires are quietly leading toward big improvements in a new generation of photovoltaics, plastic OLEDs (organic light-emitting devices), and a bunch of other applications.

 

Nanowires have suffered from the same manufacturing issues that other nanomaterials have endured, namely achieving large scale production while maintaining quality. One of the key problems nanowire developers have had to overcome is getting the nanowires to orient themselves in perfectly even arrays.

 

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in cooperation with LG Innotek have found a solution to that problem. And that solution moves away from traditional chemical synthesis to toward tricks common to semiconductor manufacturing.

 

In research published in the journal Nano Letters (“High Throughput Ultralong (20 cm) Nanowire Fabrication Using a Wafer-Scale Nanograting Template”), the Korean team leveraged semiconductor processes  to produce highly-ordered and arrays of long (up to 20 centimeters) nanowires, eliminating the need for post-production arrangement.

 

The process involves a photo engraving technique on a 20-centimeter diameter silicon wafer. First the researchers created a template on the wafer consisting of an ultrafine 100-nanometer linear grid pattern. Then they used this pattern to lay down the nanowires using a sputtering process. The method produces nanowires in bulk in perfect shapes of 50-nm width and 20 cm maximum length.

 

“The significance is in resolving the issues in traditional technology, such as low productivity, long manufacturing time, restrictions in material synthesis, and nanowire alignment,” commented Professor Jun-Bo Yoon of KAIST in a press release. “Nanowires have not been widely applied in the industry, but this technology will bring forward the commercialization of high performance semiconductors, optic devices, and biodevices that make use of nanowires.”

 

Because the process doesn’t require a long synthesis time and results in perfectly aligned nanowires, the industrial partners in the research believe that it’s a technique that should lend itself to commercialization.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Service Experience 2013: I'll Meet You at the Business Model

In many organizations, design and business co-exist as distinct silos. For too many new concepts, once the visionary phases of ideation and prototyping are done
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Gelatin Bio-Ink to Print Biological Organs and Tissues

Gelatin Bio-Ink to Print Biological Organs and Tissues | AMAZING Design | Scoop.it
German researchers have developed a new gelatin bio-ink that can be used by 3D printing technology to produce various types of tissue and organs.

 

Scientists have long been working to improve methods and procedures for artificially producing tissue. In the current work, researchers at Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology (IGB) in Stuttgart, Germany, developed a suitable bio-ink for 3D printing that consist of gelatin-based components from natural tissue matrix and living cells. Gelatin is a well-known biological material derived from collagen that serves as the main constituent of native tissue.

 

The IGB researchers were able to chemically modify the gelling behavior of the gelatin to adapt the biological molecules for printing. This allowed the bio-ink to remain fluid during printing, instead of gelling like unmodified gelatin. Once the bio-inks are irradiated with UV light, they crosslink and cure to form hydrogels – polymers containing a large amount of water (just like native tissue), but which are stable in aqueous environments and when heated to 98.6 degree Fahrenheit – the average temperature of the human body.

 

The chemical modification of these biological molecules can be controlled so that the resulting gels have differing strengths and swelling characteristics, allowing researchers to imitate various properties of natural tissue – from solid cartilage to soft adipose tissue.

 

The IGB research facility also prints synthetic raw materials that can serve as substitutes for the extracellular matrix, such as systems that cure to a hydrogel devoid of by-products, which can immediately be populated with genuine cells.

 

“We are concentrating at the moment on the ‘natural’ variant. That way we remain very close to the original material. Even if the potential for synthetic hydrogels is big, we still need to learn a fair amount about the interactions between the artificial substances and cells or natural tissue. Our biomolecule-based variants provide the cells with a natural environment instead, and therefore can promote the self-organizing behavior of the printed cells to form a functional tissue model,” said Dr. Kirsten Borchers in describing the approach at IGB.


Via Kalani Kirk Hausman, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Your Smartphone Has Officially Hijacked Your Life - Slate Magazine (blog)

Your Smartphone Has Officially Hijacked Your Life - Slate Magazine (blog) | AMAZING Design | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)
Your Smartphone Has Officially Hijacked Your Life
Slate Magazine (blog)
Camera at the ready for every photo op, voice recorder for whatever idea pops into your head and out of your mouth.
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