Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works
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David Cooperrider | Facebook

David Cooperrider | Facebook | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with David Cooperrider and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more open and connected.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
So much promise in bringing the positive education movement together in union with the world's 17 global goals. Why: its because of the concept of" mirror flourishing." 
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Arming Today’s Kids to Cope: Positive Education the Key to Developing Resilient, Self-Confident, Flourishing Lives

Arming Today’s Kids to Cope: Positive Education the Key to Developing Resilient, Self-Confident, Flourishing Lives | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
FORT WORTH, Texas, June 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Arming Today's Kids to Cope: Positive Education the Key to Developing Resilient, Self-Confiden
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
FORT WORTH, Texas, June 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- With school shootings, bullying and teen depression reaching a crescendo, thousands of educators from around the world are meeting in Fort Worth this week at the World Positive Education Accelerator June 25–28 to deal with the growing number of kids struggling to cope with school, their peers or society in general.  
"Essentially we're meeting in Fort Worth and redesigning what 21st-century global education looks like," says Sir Anthony Seldon, president of The International Positive Education Network (IPEN), a co-convener of the four-day conference. "We want educators to walk away empowered with the tools, resources and connections to make real, lasting change." The need is high. Statistics paint a grim picture with studies showing one in five children will experience a major depressive episode before graduating from high school. Many enter universities unable to tolerate points of view other than their own. 

Alarmingly, employers find that new grads entering the workforce lack the "soft skills" needed to succeed in the workplace, such as tolerance, effective communication or critical thinking. Conference attendees from as far away as Australia, the U.K., Latin America and Dubai are sharing results of their research about how utilizing positive psychology — the scientific study of positive human functioning and positive education and its application in the classroom — can lead to the development of individuals who are resilient, learn more and exhibit a mindset of well-being. Together with peers worldwide, U.S. public and private school teachers, as well as policymakers, are learning more about what positive education is and how to integrate the latest research into curriculums that boost student well-being, resilience and "grit." The meeting is the largest of its kind ever held and provides cutting-edge-yet-practical, science-based tools and solutions that can be implemented in classrooms. 

 Keynote speakers include Angela Duckworth, Ph.D., author of the best-selling book Grit: the Power of Passion and Perseverance; and Martin Seligman, Ph.D., founder of positive psychology, past president of the American Psychological Association and author of Flourish and The Hope Circuit, whose current mission is to transform social science to work on developing strengths, positive emotion, good relationships and meaning in life. Topics include "Empathy, an Antidote to Aggression," "Raising Confident Children" and "Future-Proofing Our Youth — Positive Psychology as an Antidote to a Rapidly Changing World," along with sessions that focus on peer pressure, reducing discipline problems and bullying. 

Co-convening the conference along with IPEN is Champlain College's David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry, developers of a strength-based methodology that is creating a positive framework for change in education, the corporate world, public service and elsewhere. Appreciative inquiry is being used by conference attendees to generate concrete results that turn inspiration into lasting action, organizers say.
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Increases in human wellbeing: the great untold story of our time

Increases in human wellbeing: the great untold story of our time | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Psychologists have long known that people tend to see their own lives through rose-coloured glasses: they think they’re less likely than the average person to become the victim of a divorce, layoff, accident, illness, or crime. But change the question from the people’s lives to their society, and they transform from Pollyanna to Eeyore.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Is the world in bad shape--and getting worse? According to cognitive neuroscience scholar Steven Pinker,  "it’s easy to see why people feel that way: every day the news is filled with stories about war, terrorism, crime, pollution, inequality, drug abuse, and oppression. And it’s not just the headlines we’re talking about; it’s the op-eds and the long-form stories as well. Magazine covers warn us of coming anarchies, plagues, epidemics, collapses, and so many “crises” (farm, health, retirement, welfare, energy, deficit) that copywriters have to escalate to the redundant “serious crisis”. Whether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will interact with the nature of cognition to make us think that it is. 

News is about things that happen, not things that don’t happen. We never see a journalist saying to the camera, “I’m reporting live from a country where a war has not broken out” – or a city that has not been bombed, or a school that has not been shot up. As long as bad things have not vanished from the face of the Earth, there will always be enough incidents to fill the news, especially when billions of smartphones turn most of the world’s population into crime reporters and war correspondents. And among the things that do happen, the positive and negative ones unfold on different timelines. The news, far from being a “first draft of history”, is closer to play-by-play sports commentary. hare your insight."
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The 'Why' Behind Asking Why: The Science of Curiosity

The 'Why' Behind Asking Why: The Science of Curiosity | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
A new book examines the different drivers of curiosity, and how this trait has been impacted by the digital age.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
"You cannot change your genetic makeup, but through the education system you can actually improve on curiosity. I’ll give you a very simple example. If you teach science to young children, don’t start by trying to teach them things that they may not be interested in. Start with something they’re already curious about, like dinosaurs. Start with dinosaurs and then find interesting ways to connect from that to other concepts you would like them to learn, rather than starting from the beginning with something they may not be interested in. Most people know that very young children are extremely curious. They constantly ask questions. That’s largely because they especially want to understand cause and effect. They want to understand how the world around them is functioning so that they make fewer errors. Some people think that as we grow up we lose our curiosity, and that’s not entirely true. We do lose some elements of diversive curiosity or the ability to be surprised. But actually epistemic curiosity, that love of knowledge, appears to be roughly constant across all ages." This new book shows that curiosity can be cultivated, and that there are many different kinds of curiosity. Can you guess what they are and how they are related to success, empathic relationships, and creating open mindedness--and why good questions end up creating even more questions?
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As global demand for electricity grows, geothermal energy heats up | Ensia

As global demand for electricity grows, geothermal energy heats up | Ensia | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Power producers around the world are increasingly turning their attention to the energy stored in the heat beneath our feet.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
One of the most attractive features of geothermal power lies in its reliability as a source. Wind and sun, obviously, are only available for certain periods of time. Geothermal power plants, however, can access hot water from the ground and harness its energy to drive electricity-generating turbines 24/7. That’s one of the primary reasons it’s gaining increasing attention among power producers worldwide.

“Geothermal electricity generation might not have the high-tech flashiness of solar, or the romance of wind and wave, but it’s the solid, steady workhorse of the renewable energy race,” writes science journalist Bianca Nogrady for Ensia. “The never-flagging heat lurking at various depths below the Earth’s surface is tapped to produce steam that is used to drive turbines and generate electricity. This heat can also be used more directly to warm spaces or swimming pools, but sustainable electricity generation is the goal that most have in their sights.”
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Ellen Williams: The future of energy innovation | Ensia

Ellen Williams: The future of energy innovation | Ensia | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
The director of the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy offers her thoughts on what to watch for in energy technology discovery and development.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
This recent interview with Ellen Williams, director of the US Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy, offers her highly credible insights into recent and upcoming energy innovations. Her primary role is to guide technology discovery and development in the US, so it’s an interesting read that provides both a thoughtful evaluation regarding our progress over the past decade and information about key energy breakthroughs to watch for in the near future.

“Energy storage and power electronics, in particular, have gained momentum as we have worked to decarbonize the power grid and create new energy efficiencies all through the electric power sector,” Williams says. “But innovation has come from every corner of the energy universe — better biofuel crops, energy efficient materials processing and integrating renewables into the electric power grid all come to mind.”
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Bringing nature back to cities is good for plants, animals and humans

Bringing nature back to cities is good for plants, animals and humans | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Bringing nature back to cities, or urban rewilding, is about conservation, but it’s also about reconnecting people with the natural world.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Protecting wildlife in urban areas is always controversial, but the concept of “rewilding” presents an interesting question to contemplate: Do people benefit from living in cities that reconnect them to the natural world? Urban development often reduces or even obliterates larger natural habitats, but this article explores the success that the city of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada, has had by building 27 “natural passages” since 2007. 
  
“Bringing nature back into cities — or preventing it from being destroyed — is a growing imperative in cities across the world,” says writer Nate Berg. “Taking lessons from conservation biology and applying them to the built environment, cities are proactively creating habitat for certain animals, increasing urban tree canopies and even reintroducing species that have long been displaced by roads and buildings.”
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The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever

The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Following are the simplest tips I can give you to ask better questions, which will make your conversations more valuable to you and the people you engage with.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
What have you learned about asking better questions? Here are some of the simplest tips I've seen to help you ask better "conversation creating" questions. 
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Business is Changing – And That Changes Everything | SOCAP16

Business is Changing – And That Changes Everything | SOCAP16 | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
There is already a chorus of voices promoting the practice of business as a force for good in the world. Not just “invisible-hand” good that results from the existence of a relatively free marketplace, but intentional good done through intentional business practice.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Don't miss the SOCAP16 where the theme "Business is Changing--and That Changes Everything." In this article a media CEO speaks about this as a relatively new phenomena, than business is a relatively new human endeavor. As practiced today, it was forged less than 300 years ago in the coal furnaces of the Industrial Revolution. Tennis, by comparison, has been around for 900 years. Major modern religions centuries longer. 
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D.A. Henderson, ‘disease detective’ who eradicated smallpox, dies at 87

D.A. Henderson, ‘disease detective’ who eradicated smallpox, dies at 87 | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Dr. Henderson led a worldwide army of field workers in “the single greatest achievement in the history of medicine.”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
One of my leadership heroes just passed away at 87. He inspired a book that I wrote years ago with Jane Dutton and others called "The Organization Dimensions of Global Change: No Limits to Cooperation." His name was Dr D.A. Henderson and he used living proof to show that it is no longer utopian to act and come together rapidly, effectively, and supercooperatively as a whole human family to deal with global, transboundary issues--ones that cannot be dealt with by any one individual, organization, industry, culture, civilization or nation, alone. I met with him and spent many hours with him when we--a great team with Bill Pasmore, Frank Barrett, Tojo Thatchenkery, Mary Finney and many others-- brought him to Case Western Reserve University on more than one occasion to speak with our project called "social innovations in global management" (the SIGMA project). 

Here is a short excerpt from our book:   

"Future historians of global change will surely rank May 8, 1980 among the big dates. For on May 8 when the World Health Assembly declared that smallpox had been eradicated from the planet, it became the first, and as yet, only global problem in history to have been “eradicated” or solved by organized action on a local-global world scale. The achievement can scarcely be overstated. Involving nearly a quarter million staff from 69 countries including a multidisciplinary, multicultural group of 700 leaders, this global change response successfully addressed, in ten years, a dreaded world boundary-crossing disease that had deadly effects on the human population since the time of the Neolithic age (hundreds of millions died). Citation of this effort has happened over a thousand times in the medical literature. This is scarcely surprising given the life saving import of such an achievement, as well as the implications for other global health concerns, e.g. HIV/Aids, and many other childhood diseases. But to this day, at the time of this writing,  there has yet to emerge one theoretical or empirical study of this organizational breakthrough—from the perspective of leadership, decision making, organization design, management, strategic alliances, human motivation, managing change, Multicultural management or others."

At a time when Hillary Clinton gets applause by declaring, "I believe in science," it's worth taking a moment to remember the life and achievements of Donald Ainslee Henderson. All he did with science, purpose-driven leadership, and new forms of human cooperation and global action, was to eradicate smallpox.
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Giant Coral Reef in Protected Area Shows New Signs of Life

Giant Coral Reef in Protected Area Shows New Signs of Life | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
This month, the Massachusetts-based research team finished a new exploration of the reefs in the secluded Phoenix Islands, a tiny Pacific archipelago, and were thrilled by what they saw. When they splashed out of an inflatable dinghy to examine Coral Castles closely, they were greeted with a vista of bright greens and purples — unmistakable signs of life.

“Everything looked just magnificent,”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Life wants to bust out all over. And we know so little about its resilience. So we need to search for signs of “positive deviance” for example coral reefs. In 2003, researchers declared Coral Castles dead. On the floor of a remote island lagoon halfway between Hawaii and Fiji, the giant reef site had been devastated by unusually warm water. Its remains looked like a pile of drab dinner plates tossed into the sea. Research dives in 2009 and 2012 had shown little improvement in the coral colonies. Then in 2015, a team of marine biologists was stunned and overjoyed to find Coral Castles, genus Acropora, once again teeming with life. But the rebound came with a big question: Could the enormous and presumably still fragile coral survive what would be the hottest year on record? No one actually knows what drives reef resilience or even what a coral reef looks like as it is rebounding. But discoveries like this are precious, even if just an “N” of 1. The whole NY Times article is worth a read!
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New Solar Device Removes Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere

New Solar Device Removes Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
If the experimental technology can be commercialized, it can become an important tool for reducing the impact of climate change.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
This will be an intriguing innovation story to follow. The inventors of a new type of solar-powered technology that could help counter climate change still must perfect it in the lab and transition the device into industrial-scale use. It’s going to take a while to see if they succeed, but the potential is great. To date, their research, funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation, has resulted in a prototype of a device that will produce fuel at approximately $2 a gallon so that it would be competitive with gasoline but could eliminate the need to drill for oil and gas. The technology directly employs the energy of the sun and doesn’t require any electricity or external energy. “Although burning such a transportation fuel would release the carbon back into the atmosphere, it could be considered a carbon-neutral energy source,” the author explains. “That’s because that carbon would have been removed from the atmosphere to make the syngas, thus producing no new emissions.”
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World's First 'Tesla Town' Coming to Australia

World's First 'Tesla Town' Coming to Australia | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Plans for the world's first "Tesla town" are underway. YarraBend, a suburb-to-be located just outside of Melbourne's city center, is under development by local property group Glenvill.The world's first "Tesla town" is coming to Melbourne, Australia. Glenvill
The developers have already put th
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The world’s first “Tesla Town” is now under development in a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Developers of YarraBend have already put the first 60 homes on the market. According to this article, the eco-friendly abodes will have rooftop solar, Tesla's battery storage system, electric car recharging points and energy-efficient lighting as standard design features. The development will ultimately be home to 2,500 new residences. The three-to-five bedrooms houses, townhouses and apartments will range from $1.48 million to $2.1 million in price. So, they won’t be cheap, but they will set the pace for models of sustainable residential communities. Down Under’s new City of the Future will feature an innovative sustainability component pioneered by Tesla’s CEO: “Elon Musk’s game-changing suite of batteries for businesses, homes and utilities were designed to help wean the world off fossil fuels. The batteries store electricity generated from solar panels. (If everything goes to Musk's plan, the batteries will be charged with Tesla's own solar panels). Australia received its first shipment of Tesla Powerwalls roughly six months ago.”
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The World's Best Entrepreneurs Share One Key Human Strength Says Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg

The World's Best Entrepreneurs Share One Key Human Strength Says Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Why Sandberg and famed psychologists believe "clear-eyed optimists" will shape the future. 
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
What's the one key human strength that's shared by innovators--a strength that builds relationships for collective action; builds resilience;  promotes curiosity; expands the sense of the possible; and activates caring for the future? 

Read on. One executive, Sheryl Sandberg, proposes an answer and cites studies and her own experience. 
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Think progress is a myth? Look at these infographics: so much can be getting better and better when we look at the longer narratives rather than numbing news

Think progress is a myth? Look at these infographics: so much can be getting better and better when we look at the longer narratives rather than numbing news | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Steven Pinker says 'we’re apt to mistake the harms around us for signs of how low the world has sunk rather than how high our standards have risen.' What does the data say?
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
If watching the news does not make us hopeful, watching the numbers might. Steven Pinker writes ‘we’re apt to mistake the harms around us for signs of how low the world has sunk rather than how high our standards have risen.’ In addition its nearly impossible for the news to tell the story of good. Can you imagine a reporter looking at "the long peace" since world war II and standing in a country saying "here is the headline news--our headline today is how many people have not died because of war?" Well this simply does not happen. See this amazing video clip trying to tell the story of the fact that we are living in one of the most non-violent times in human history! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwKPFT-RioU
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How to Spark Curiosity in Learning Through Embracing Uncertainty and Experimental Certainty

How to Spark Curiosity in Learning Through Embracing Uncertainty and Experimental Certainty | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to confront what we don't know can trigger curiosity and lead to new discoveries, according to author Jamie Holmes.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
We need to move from certainty to experimental certainty, and then from experimental certainty to the experience of mystery, if we are ever going to enter the theatre of inquiry. Yet our schools teach everything as if there are answers--like "name the three main causes of World War Two".... But our collective understanding of any given subject is never complete, according to to this article and learning thinkers such as Jamie Holmes, who has just written a book on the hidden benefits of uncertainty. In “Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing,” Holmes explores how the discomforting notions of ambiguity and uncertainty affect the way we think and behave. Confronting what we don’t know sometimes triggers curiosity.
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Most Beautiful And Amazingly Captured Wild Animals Photography

Most Beautiful And Amazingly Captured Wild Animals Photography | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Today we have collected awesome collection of wild animal photography. The wild animal photograph
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The appreciable world is so much larger than our normal appreciative eye. The physician Juan Carlos was known to carry around a notepad that said: "things I noticed today...that I've never noticed until today."
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“We Change Best When We Are Strongest” - BEING CHIEF ®

“We Change Best When We Are Strongest”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
“We Change Best When We Are Strongest”
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The Surprising Power Of Appreciation At Work

The Surprising Power Of Appreciation At Work | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
when you focus on what is working, and when you take an appreciative approach to your work you keep the door open for many more possibilities.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Forbes has published an article on the power of appreciation in the workplace...and it emphasizes how when you systematically study things that give life to human systems, and when you take an appreciative approach to your work you keep the door open for many more possibilities, as in the innovator's tool "IMAGINE IF....?"  It reminded me of a wonderful quote from Kierkegaard when he said: "“If I were to wish for anything, I should not wish for wealth and power, but for the passionate sense of the potential, for the eye which, ever young and ardent, sees the possible. Pleasure disappoints, possibility never. And what wine is so sparkling, what so fragrant, what so intoxicating, as possibility!”
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The psychology of inspiration

The psychology of inspiration | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Inspiring examples give us a glimpse that something else is possible. They provide a new reference point that ups our bar when considering what we might do. As we learn by watching others, one of the biggest influences on human behaviour is what we see other people do. Unfortunately, our tendency to follow the example of role models can also work in a negative way, as the following experiment illustrates.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
If you began a sentence with the phrase “what inspires me is…,” what words might naturally follow? 

The psychology of inspiration needs to be placed in juxtaposition with the social psychology of curiosity. Curiosity builds relationships and inspiration  opens our minds to new possibilities and helps us respond to concerns in constructive ways. Chris Johnstone explains how we can become inspired and inspire others too. What does your life experience teach about inspiration and discovery? Inspiration and insight? Inspiration and energy? Think of a time you have been genuinely inspired and how did your inspiration affect others? Are there ways to actively cultivate inspiration? 
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How to build a business that lasts 100 years | Martin Reeves

If you want to build a business that lasts, there may be no better place to look for inspiration than your own immune system. Join strategist Martin Reeve
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
It’s well worth it to spend 15 minutes watching this TED Talk by Martin Reeves on how to build a business that will last 100 years. Inspired by qualities of the human immune system, Reeves and his friend Simon Levin, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton University, identified six strengths of the immune system that companies should model: redundancy, diversity, modularity, adaptation, prudence and embeddedness. They have mined biomimicry at the highest, systemic level for some powerful insights. After pointing out that the average lifespan of a business today is only 30 years, Reeves concludes: “Where better to turn for advice than nature that’s been in the business of life and death longer than any company.”
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Smart Cities Will Need The IoT and Open Data | Articles | Big Data

Smart Cities Will Need The IoT and Open Data | Articles | Big Data | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
In order for smart cities to reach their potential, it is essential for infrastructures to be created for IoT devices and open data platforms to be implemented
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Smart cities are on the rise. Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, New York and Philadelphia, for example, have made substantial commitments to develop the key components. At the heart of a smart city are efficient information and communication technologies (ICTs) to improve the quality of life of its citizens and a “green” infrastructure that combines the natural environment and engineered systems to preserve the environment and provide a range of benefits, such as clean water. This article delves into what smart cities will need to operate the most effective ICTs. “This is about more than simply creating wifi hotspots and self-driving cars, it is about utilizing the Internet of Things to create a networked city that allows for the free communication of data” writes Gabrielle Morse in the article. “Essentially, the success of smart cities will come down to the effective use of both open data and the Internet of Things.”
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Three ways artificial intelligence is helping to save the world

Three ways artificial intelligence is helping to save the world | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
As computers get smarter, scientists look at new ways to enlist them in environmental protection.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The entire big data phenomenon continues to provide us with tremendous advances in knowledge that are changing the way our world operates, from healthcare to transportation. Now, machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence that employs computers to sort through the voluminous amounts of information gathered for big data analysis, is having a beneficial impact on environmental sciences. “A slew of projects have been popping up in this relatively new field, called computational sustainability, that combine data gathered about the environment with a computer’s ability to discover trends and make predictions about the future of our planet,” says freelance science journalist Erin Biba for this article in Ensia. “This is useful to scientists and policy-makers because it can help them develop plans for how to live and survive in our changing world.” She details several examples in the article.
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5 Ways Medical VR Is Changing Healthcare

5 Ways Medical VR Is Changing Healthcare | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Five great examples of medical VR transforming patient lives and how doctors work, like live-streaming risky operations and experiencing life as an elderly.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Our healthcare industry continues to capitalize on technological advances. Medical virtual reality, for example, is emerging as an important tool that will, as this article points out, have an increasing impact on surgical simulations and training exercises; reduction of stress, pain and boredom for patients recovering in a hospital bed and can be especially effective at making children more comfortable and relaxed; simulating life as an elderly person to enhance empathy in physicians and surgeons; and expediting recovery after a stroke. “Medical VR is an area with fascinating possibilities,” the author says. “It has not just moved the imagination of science-fiction fans, but also clinical researchers and real life medical practitioners. Although the field is brand new, there are already great examples of VR having a positive effect on patients’ lives and physicians’ work.”
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Smart Dust Is Coming: New Camera Is the Size of a Grain of Salt

Smart Dust Is Coming: New Camera Is the Size of a Grain of Salt | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Miniaturization is one of the most world-shaking trends of the last several decades. Computer chips now have features measured in billionths of a meter. Sensors that... read more
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
In this article, Jason Dorrier explains how a breakthrough in optical technology will result in a new camera the size of a grain of salt. Although it may be a while before the technology is perfected and available, it’s definitely on the way. We’ve witnessed myriad remarkable innovations due to miniaturization, and his article chronicles the development of this advancement in camera lens capabilities and what it represents. “Perhaps most mind-bending of all is considering what happens when sensors, antennas, and even computing equipment can be combined into information gathering devices on the microscale,” Dorrier writes. “Simply put, smart dust is what will happen if miniaturization continues on its current trajectory—the point at which devices can be scattered to the winds in the millions, billions, or even trillions to measure the world in breathtaking detail.”
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