Amanda's UACMC Portfolio
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Amanda's UACMC Portfolio
My work over this semester in my computer mediated class.
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Modes of Communication- Face to Face

Modes of Communication- Face to Face | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

For face to face communication, I chose Skype. With all of the different modes of communicating online or on your phone, its interesting to see that according to the reading, face to face interaction is still the most common. Skype gives us a way to talk face to face on the computer as well as on a cellphone. Instead of just hearing a voice, or reading the words they type, Skype allows us to see the person on the other side and interact as if we were right next to them. This way we could see their facial expressions or social cues to have a more personal conversation. From a study, "The results showed that FTF interactions were only slightly more frequent with close relationships than non-close relationships. This suggests that perhaps the choice of communication mode is influenced less by the strength of the tie than by the type of tie connecting two individuals" (Quan-Haase, 2007). I feel that I use Skype to interact to many people with a closer relationship, but sometimes I do video chat wtih peopel I went to highschool with that I haven't kept in touch with all along. In our group presentation about Facebook for adults over 40, we discussed how Skype has integrated onto Facebook Chat. This way, adults can video chat with their children that are in college, or other family that is far away. Skype makes it possible to not miss an important occasion and helps with distant relationships.

 

Resources:

 

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

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Modes of Communication- Mobile

Modes of Communication- Mobile | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

Mobile communication is a very convenient way to maintain relationships and support students’ local and distant social ties (Quan-Haase, 2007). Most social networking sites have mobile applications so you wouldn't miss a thing in the online world. For this post I chose to discuss Twitter. Twitter had a mobile application that allows you to tweet on the go. Having phone applications make interaction for our generation even less face to face, since mobile devices recently can pretty much do anything. In class we had a scavenger hunt, and one group member had to stay by the computer, and the rest had to disperse around campus. In order to know what to find, Professor Yonkers tweeted the clues. To make it easier for the person that was in the classroom, the group members downloaded the Twitter application so they could see them as soon as they're posted. You could tweet, follow, upload photos, and respond with the app, so it made the scavenger hunt even more interesting being on the go.  It's interesting to notice in the reading, that mobile communication was the least popular in the study because of the cost of texting and calling.  However, smart phones are taking over our generation and they are things that will always be used to interact.

 

Resources:

 

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

 

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Formal CMC

Formal CMC | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

For formal communication, I chose Blackboard. Blackboard Learn is meant for making learning more convenient and effective. According to the Hrastinski reading, formal communication has many specific characteristics that differs it from informal communication. These characteristics must include one-way communication, mandatory, scheduled, authority-organized, content focused, and formal language. The computer mediated communication course listed on Blackboard fits this description.

 

Each day we go to the class, Professor Yonkers has the directions for the class on a post on Blackboard. This is one way communication, because it’s just her giving the directions, there is no option for feedback on the comments. These were scheduled, for every Tuesday and Thursday class. Blackboard is authority-organized, since the professor creates the course and all of the course content. Professor Yonkers uses formal language when giving directions instead of informal as if she is talking to a friend. Lastly, the information given out on Blackboard was content focused to the students. It had specific instructions and readings to participate in. High formality of an online learning system like Blackboard is very needed to work for students. If it was informal and didn't have a professor on the other end of it, it wouldn't be taken as seriously and wouldn't enforce the assignments and work as well.

 

Resources: 

 

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Informal CMC

Informal CMC | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

I chose my personal blog to represent informal communication. "It has been recognized for many years that informal communication is an important part of effective work and thus vitally important in organizations" (Kraut et al. 1990; Mintzberg 1973; Whittaker, Frohlich & Daly-Jones 1994). My personal blog, named Amanda's CMC Interaction Blog, is used for the assignments in the course that is asking for our opinion and our view.

 

In the reading, Fish and colleagues’ developed a model that distinguished
characteristics of informal and formal dimensions of communication, and was then further enhanced (Hrastinski, 2010). The characteristics of informal communication that fit my personal blog are that it has random participants, interactive, rich context, low cost, experience focused, and informal language. I am never fully aware of who is viewing my blog, it is open for people to read about things that they usually have interests or opinions on themselves. It is definitely interactive because the people who view this blog could write comments and ask questions about the specific topic. Blogger is a free site that allows you to make your own blog and share with the public. My blog also doesn't have a formal language. It is more personal and is written as I feel I would verbally explain it. Lastly, instead of being more content focused, it is more experienced focused because all four blog posts in my blog are written by what I know from experience. My first blog was about my experience and my view on 4 CMC tools: Prezi, Webpage, Twitter and Blogger. My second post was links about the definition of culture that I found through research. My next post explained my own definition of what I thought community was. My most recent post explained my digital footprint and what information you can find about me when searching on Google.

 

I enjoy reading blogs and from my experience in this course I also enjoyed writing my own. I think this informal way of communicating is a really great way to promote your own ideas about specific topics and information.

 

Resources: 

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Developing Identity

Developing Identity | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

An example of developing identity would be my professional Facebook page. Since my regular Facebook page may not be the best thing to show for future employers, our professor made a good point to make a separate one.

 

On Facebook, you can create an identity for yourself and form the profile to resemble how you want to be seen. According to the reading by Ellison, Heino, and Gibbs, interactants in online environments have greater control over self-presentational behavior which allows individuals to manage their online interactions more strategically. On this page, I can display only the things I would want employers or professors to see, with what I chose to write as well as with privacy settings. There are privacy settings for pretty much every single line, picture, or bit of information about yourself on your profile. This can be very beneficial when I want to embrace my professional image to the job world. I can also filter and curate who is able to see the information by accepting or rejecting friend requests that I may get.

 

According to Higgins's three domains of self, this Facebook page would be my actual self, which is defined by the attributes an individual possesses. On this professional page I put more information about my education including my communications honor society. This way this profile can show my idea of self that I would like to portray to a more professional community.

 

Resources:

 

Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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Modes of Communication- Online

Modes of Communication- Online | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

Another mode of communication would be online communicating. Online communication including e-mail and instant messaging, is a very useful way for people to communicate from anywhere all over the world. According to the reading, since they were inexpensive and readily available on campus, email and instant messaging were highly used by students and they facilitated a close integration of far-flung ties into university students’ everyday lives (Quan-Haase, 2007). For this, I chose my Gmail account for emailing. In our first day of class our Professor instructed us to make a Gmail account, in order to have a separate account from our Albany one, which would also benefit us when we graduate. It’s a way to network without needing to make a profile or add photos; all you have to do is make a user name. As a senior, I know my Albany account will eventually terminate, so it was really good for me to have a separate email that I can begin using early and connect with people. I also used my Gmail account when connecting with my group about our final project. We sent our sections that we completed up and back, and sent our final project to all as well. In conclusion, E-mailing is a great way to remain social relationships with everyone from family, friends, ex-coworkers, and other people that you have interacted with in the past. It's extremely convenient and is a way of communicating that has stayed simple since it was created. 

 

Resources:

 

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

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CMC Language

CMC Language | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

For CMC language, I chose to discuss Facebook Chat. According to the reading by Herring, "Computer-mediated discourse is the communication produced when human beings interact with one another by transmitting messages via networked computers". When interacting with others online, its important to distinguish the language in which you are communicating. Facebook has two ways of messaging. One way is by sending messages when a user doesn't have to be online, which is called Asynchronous CMD systems. These messages can be sent to any Facebook user and they will be read when the user signs on to Facebook. The other way of messaging is on Facebook Chat. This was the easiest way to message my group members during an assignment after we became Facebook friends. This real time messaging would be synchronous CMD. "This messaging consists of the users needing to be logged on simultaneously, and messages are more ephemeral, scrolling up and off participants' computer screens as new messages replace them" (Herrings, 2007).

 

According to Herring, both of these ways of messaging on Facebook would be one-way transmission. During this, a message is transmitted as a single unit, and the recipients don't know that the message is being sent to them until it arrives, thereby precluding the possibility of simultaneous feedback. On many social networking sites, its very rare to see formal or elegant language like it used to be. It used to be that information on the computer was polished English, when now on the computer it is full of abbreviated code words and fragmented sentences. For example, when I am messaging my group on Facebook Chat, I don't pay attention to my grammar and we say things like “heyyy”, "lol", and "u" instead of "you". With that just being a couple of the many, many examples, it’s very clear to see that the Internet possess a "whole new fractured language" (Herrings, 2007). Also, when you get closer with the receiver of the message, you may see yourself using even more abbreviated language. It’s so easy to speak in your own language and how you are comfortable with on the computer since it isn’t face to face. It’s very interesting to see how language and communication will further change in the future, but currently there are so many different forms of communication online.

 

Resources: 

Herring, S. (Classification) (2007) A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse. Language@Internet (4). Available at http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2007/761/index_html/

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Filtering/Curating

Filtering/Curating | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

I chose Twitter as a tool that incorporates filtering and curating. When you see a hashtag now, you automatically think of Twitter. It enables you to search for exactly what you want. For example, in class one of our assignments was to search for news about Occupy Wall Street and see which people we would trust and not trust. In the search bar, you can search anything with the hashtag before. I typed #OWS and all of the posts that were written by people all over the world that had the same hashtag #OWS was listed. According to the Masullo-Chen blog, one of the main purposes of the hashtag is to help sort and organize information content by use of key words.

 

There’s a section on Twitter that shows the trending topics. This updates and changes all throughout the day. The way each of these topics trend is by the amount of people that tweet about a certain hashtag topic. You can filter and curate which trends you want to see by location. It usually goes automatically to worldwide trends, and you can change it to New York, for example. Right now, the trending topics are #2BHonest, #Giants, and #IcanAdmit. Its really interesting to see how many people pick the same key words to describe their comments or posts. I think it’s really wild that you can search pretty much anything with a hash-tag and there’s people all over the world that are writing about the same topic.

 

Being able to filter and curate on Twitter really helps somebody find exactly what they're looking for. Without an option to filter your search results it would be a much harder process to get the information you want.

 

 

 Resources: 

 

Masullo-Chen, G. (2011) How to use twitter hashtag. Save the media blog. Available at http://savethemedia.com/2011/03/04/howtousetwitterhashtag/

 

 

 

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Networking

Networking | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

I chose LinkedIn as my example for networking. LinkedIn has become one of the most popular social media tools, along as a powerful business service. It is very important to have a good way to network with others because it can help you for future opportunities professionally. "Social network sites (SNSs) are increasingly attracting the attention of academic and industry researchers intrigued by their affordances and reach" (Boyd and Ellison, 2007). I made this profile during the summer while I interned for a media agency, and I have kept in touch with many of the people I worked with. Many of those I worked with even asked me to message them on LinkedIn instead of e-mailing them. In this course, I edited and made it more descriptive to benefit me professionally.  LinkedIn allows you to create and manage relationships online. For professionals, it allows you to have accurate information about potential workers at their fingertips.

 

Boyd and Ellison define social networking sites as web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. The nature and nomenclature of these connections may vary from site to site. (Boyd and Ellison, 2007). LinkedIn without a doubt fits this definition. Each member creates a profile where they list information about their past and current education, past and current jobs, location, etc. To make this easier, it gives you the option to upload your resume, and it would incorporate the information into the LinkedIn profile format. It allows you to connect to different people in many ways. You can "follow" groups and associations you are involved with, and any news will constantly be updated to you. Any relationship you have made in your past you can connect with on LinkedIn, and their updates and comments will appear to you when you first sign on your page.

 

You can filter and curate who you are looking for when searching in many ways. When you search for somebody’s name, you can filter your search by education, location, past industry, past company, along with many other choices. There are also privacy settings to allow what you want people to see when they first search for you before you become a connection. When you request a connection with somebody, it even asks how you know them. LinkedIn lists the option of getting recommendations from past employers in order for future employers to see them right away listed on the profile. Overall, social networking sites are very important to be a part of. I feel that LinkedIn is especially important for students like myself that are graduating college and have to begin job searching. It gives a great way to make your information accessible and helps maintain all of the relationships that can help you in the future.

 

Resources:

Boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). "Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Available at Library in eholdings database.

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Community Building

Community Building | Amanda's UACMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

In this course, I have found myself building a community in various ways. The first day, our professor had us make a Twitter account.  As the weeks went on, we posted various comments relating to the topics we spoke about that class.  Each post, we had to use a hash-tag of #UACMC.  This resulted in filtering and curating the class's posts being listed under that topic, and being able to access all of them. This created a community in the way that it created a social tie with each other that was cheap, easy, and convenient.  This creates social capital.  According to a wired Toronto neighborhood studied by Hampton and Wellman , he suggested that information technology may enhance place-based community and facilitate the generation of social capital (Ellison, Steingield, Lampe, 2007). 

 

Another way that I have built community during this semester is on Twitter posts.  One of our assignments was to see how the Official University at Albany website showed community building.  I found three specific sections of the UAlbany site, and posted them on Twitter with the hash-tag #UACMC, and the link of the website.  My posts consisted of a freshman and transfer student guide with videos and help with what to pack, a section on the UAlbany fall fest- "Fallbany", and a section of Albany spirit with cheers and chants.  This showed different ways that the university emphasized community building.

 

References:

 

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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