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Caroline Kennedy takes public office in Japan, 50 years after JFK's death

Caroline Kennedy takes public office in Japan, 50 years after JFK's death | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
TOKYO - Caroline Kennedy, daughter of slain U.S. President John F. Kennedy, arrived in Japan on Friday to take up her first high profile job in public office, making a late start to a political career for which her family is renowned.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the Kennedy name, along with supporting the President, still has some pull in getting appointments.  I know that many Ambassador posts are given to supporters of the President as a reward, and many of them do not have any experience in foregin affairs.  However they are usually nominated, or let alone approved,  to posts in countries that are not seen as crucial in the US foregin policy, like Amabassador to San Marino, that small independant country in the middle of Italy, and not to a strategic ally in East Asia.  With no foregin policy experience except for being the daughter of JFK, is she really qualified for this diplomatic post?  Should this post have gone to a more experiened diplomat?  How about starting out your diplomatic career in a country that is not so crucial to US interests and working your way up to a post like Japan?  Well only time will tell if this post was a good idea.

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing turn around in policies that have been in force for decades.  Well it really is changing I think for self interest and globalization and world pressure.  First of all their population is aging rapdily and they themselves stated they will face a labor shortage if the policy doesn't change, and they will need the workforce in this global market.  Also the abolishing of the labor camps, though not said directly in the news caste you can infer that with CNN finding that the labor camps were making exported goods, the Chinese government was probably feeling pressure from world governemts to stop the practice or the exports could be effected.  With India's economic strenght growing the Chinese will need to be competitive in the global market.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:32 PM

As of November 2013, this CNN article says that Beijing, China plans to get rid of their one-child policy and also abolish labor camps. Sterilization and forced abortions are going to be eased upon, after the urging from many nations over the last 3 decades. CNN asks people in the street how they felt about this ease up. Citizens eagerly report that they plan on having 2 children. China is also facing an again population, which is probably why the government is changing their radical policy practiced since the 70’s. Another main outcome of this new policy is the abolishment of the labor camps called “reeducation through Labor” which put people in jail for up to 4 years without a trial. 

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Westerly granite found in hundreds of monuments, from Gettysburg to Roger Williams statue

Westerly granite found in hundreds of monuments, from Gettysburg to Roger Williams statue | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
WESTERLY — In the late 1800s, if you were a state looking to memorialize your Civil War dead or a robber baron in the market for the biggest mausoleum in the cemetery, you probably went to Westerly.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a little bit of local information.  I actually read this article in the newspaper, yes I am old school.  The granite found and mined in Westerly, which is in the southern part of Rhode Island near the Connecticut border, was prized to make maonuments and building at the turn of the 20th century.  One of the most imposing statutes that was made with this granite is at the Antietam National Cemetery.  See http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/antietam-national-cemetery-part-2.htm for a picture of the statue.  This momument was also carved here and was made by James Pollette, also of Westerly, RI.   The granite was used in momuments all over the country and in buildings as well.  Nice from the smallest state in the Union.    

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Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star

Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Japan announced that it will send 1,000 of its servicemen to join relief efforts for the victims of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Visayas.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just something to show how the world is responding and how times have changed.  The last time the Japanese military came to the Philippines was as invaders in 1941and left with MacArthur's return in 1944.  Ironic that the Typhoon hit the area close by Red Beach where MacArthur came ashore to fullfill his "I shall return" promise.  This just shows how times have changed and former enemies can come together in a time of need.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:27 PM

Japan is going to send 1,000 troops to the philippines to help bring relief along with numerous amounts of supplies. It just shows how much the world can come together to help one country during a great time in need. 

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

With the growing number of people in general and the economy growing giving access to more "stuff" the governement seems to have fallen behind in providing the infrastructure to support this type of growth.  Yes it is easier to get a phone then to get plumbing..why?  It is not like the US where most cities have the basic infrastructure set up...there is a main sewer line.  It might be expnsive to hook up to, but it is relatively simple and inexpensive when compare to not have a main line to begin with.  That requires a major industrial effort, city planning, major disruption to the daily life.  In the US, adding a main sewer line is a big job, but its one which can be done easily when compared to other countries.  India is an economic boom, alot of activity, but they also need to step up to get the basic infrastructure down so all the people can take advantage of this new wealth.  It is the largest democracy in the world, but it lacks the industrial muscle to take on large civic projects that are necessary to keep up with the growth.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:18 PM

With the lack of toilets and the uprising in the use of cell phones in India, the sanitation and living standards of the people of the country are lacking which in turn comes to a place of hazard. With more people moving into the country and from other areas it is causing a massive uprise in the use of technology but government funding and jobs do not create enough money to continuously keep up with the upgrades needed in sanitation and public safety.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:27 PM

there is a constantly recurring theme here, mass population growth and the government of said country not being able to grow at the same rate to provide simple services to its people

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The devestation is just incredible and almost unbelievable.  It really shows just how we are at the mercy of nature no matter how we try to change our environment.  The technology is also incredible.  Not 10 years ago what we see now instantly would have taken alot longer.  This can also help the international rescue effort in going to where they are needed the most.  Having this information is priceless.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:51 PM

Such powerful imagery. I was tinkering around with the pictures and moving the scroller from right to left, keeping my eye on a particular house that stood before the typhoon. To keep scrolling to the left and to watch that image of the house completely disappear was absolutely surreal. It made the news of the devastation wrought by the storm seem so much more real; here I was, sitting in class and watching a home- a place where a family once lived, where lives had been and were continuing to be forged- completely disappear from the face of the map, never to return. I have lived in the same home for 15 years, and I could never imagine watching my home disappear in such a manner. The psychological impact of this devastation on such a massive scale is unimaginable, something that must be endured in order to truly understand- and, unfortunately for the people living in these areas, they now understand it all too well. The financial recovery from this storm will eventually come- perhaps not as fast as hoped, but it will, as always- but the recovery in human costs will take much longer. For those affected, many will believe that there can never be a recovery. Watching that home disappear in the blink of an eye makes me feel that they are probably right.

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Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In Nepal, government owned forests are being felled at record speed, while community managed ones are thriving.

 

This is a great link for discussing governance and the environmental interactions and community.   


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This shows want can be done to help preserve some of the natural habitat that we all need to live.  While the government lands are being used, illegally, though the government does nothing to stop it becasue of the economic stimulus it provides the lands given too the commnity are surviving and actually striving.  So why can't something like this be done in the Brazilian rain forest.  Set some of it aside to the community so they can maintain it, let it grow so that one of the most important natural resoures on this planet just doesn'tend up as ashes.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:00 PM

The deforestation of Nepal to supply the growing needs of India is an example of how growth in one country strips another of its resources. While Nepal may gain in the short term form logging away their forests, deforestation has steep long term costs. Many people live off the forests and their disappearance could threaten to ruin their culture.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 23, 2014 1:05 PM

Rapid population growth and development in a country can lead to dangerous resource drains, both illegal and legal, in neighboring countries. India's growth demands more wood, and Nepal has been trying to supply their demand. In the last 20 years, 25% of Nepal's forests have been harvested for the logging industry. The demand for wood and rising prices has caused an illegal logging industry that threatens non-governmental forests. Luckily, in the 1980s, Nepal handed over 25% of the forests to communities, who have worked to preserve them.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:09 AM

This is really a sad thing to behold, these jungles which for many many years have provided resources to both wild life and resources for the people of Nepal. Unfortunately now partially because of globalization these jungles are far more valuable for their lumber than as living forests. The destruction of the environment such as this is a huge catastrophe for the world as a whole. Ideally the government or foreign powers will do something to prevent the entirety of the forests from being cut down.

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The weird, violent history of the Indo-Pakistani border.

 

Geography rarely makes sense without the added lens of history.  This fantastic article chonicles the history of the geopolitical conflict between India and Pakistan, centering on the disputed Kashmir region.  This border is tied into colonial, cultural, political and religious layers of identity.  As one of the great unresolved issues of the colonial era, this standoff may loom large as India becomes increasingly significant on the global scale.     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

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National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality

National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In the end, rank falls away

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

If you have never visited a veterans cemetery, I think it is important to go and just visit even if you do not have a realtive there.  These men and women gave their lives for us in one way or another.  No matter what creed, what belief or which religion they followed all are treated with same care.  If you really want to see an amazing site goto a US Military Cemetery overseas.  These gaves are maitained by the locals, French, Italians, Ducth, etc.  They keep them neat, clean, with flowers and make sure our soldiers that died for them are not forgotten.  The one overlooking Normandy is amazing.  I have had the privledge to visit the US Cemetary near Rome and the feeling you get...well undescribable.   Take a look here for a view of these cemeteries.  http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/index.php

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:21 PM

This Veteran's day many will go to cemeteries to remember fallen soldiers.  These are secular sites, but still sacred space to many.  The sanctity of these places are intentional and considerable planning goes into the spatial layout and design of the cemeteries.  Enjoy the day off for Veteran's Day, but don't forget to remember.

Expert's comment, November 11, 2013 6:42 AM
Hi, I'd be happy if you visit my site? http://oyunskor.toretto.org
Caren Izzo's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:09 AM

Veterans' Day today.  Thank a vet for their service.

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5 Historical Monuments Have Been Destroyed Forever During Syria's Civil War

5 Historical Monuments Have Been Destroyed Forever During Syria's Civil War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Syria's incredible historical heritage is being blasted to pieces.

 

As Syria's tragic civil war continues without a resolution in sight, the conflict's death toll continues to soar. But this isn't the only disastrous consequence of the conflict — Syria's breathtaking historical and architectural heritage is being blasted to pieces by the ongoing civil war, too.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The human toll is the worst result of this civil war, but there is the loss of historical and cultural sites that will also hurt this entire region.  The castle above is one of the finest examples of a Crusader Castle build in the old Crusader Kingdoms.  Having a western architecture smack in the Middle East is just awe inspirering.  The beautiful mosques that have been destroyed is like having Norte Dame in Paris destroyed, it is part of their past, their culture.  The human cost is immeasurable, but so is the historical loss.

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  Looks like my state will be underwater.  An amazng graphic that really puts into perspective the reality of rising ocean levels. 

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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HowStuffWorks "Why is the Sahel shifting?"

HowStuffWorks "Why is the Sahel shifting?" | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Sahel, the band of land that divides the Saharrah from Africa's rainforests, is shifting. Learn about the Sahel.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Alot of factors are casuing this change.  Lack of rainfall from a shifting climate due to warmer oceans, exterme population growth that is effecting the straining the carrying capacity of the area beyond its limit, farming in a way that destorys the soil and not allowing the soil to absorb what rainfall does fall.  All of this combined it allowing the desert to expand into the Sahel area.  There are ways to stop some of what is going on, like the article states in Nigeria they are changing how the people farm, by leaving the tress in place that hold the soil and allow it to retain the rain that does fall is just one example.  This area needs more than money thrown at it inorder to survive.  People have to be taught how to use the area in a way that will both sustain them and still keep the area arable.

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Turkey's Marmaray project: An ambitious plan to link Europe and Asia

Turkey's Marmaray project: An ambitious plan to link Europe and Asia | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As a country, Turkey is often described as a bridge between Europe and Asia. On Tuesday, for the first time, the two continents will be officially connected by a multi-billion dollar underwater railway tunnel.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Istanbul has also been said to be both a European and Middle East city, some of the city is on the European side of the Bospourous.  Turkey also has been historically seen as the bridge or link between Europe and the Middle East.  This project, like the Chunnel that connects the United Kingdom to France, and therefore mainland Europe, is going to make the city even more of the economic center of Turkey and help with the sever travel between the Middle East side and European side of Turkey.  I also wonder will the EU look at this an see this as a positive for Turkey and maybe help influnce their decision to let Turkey in the EU?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 29, 2013 6:42 PM

Turkey is not truly Middle Eastern nor European--it is that liminal in-between space.  Possibly this tunnel will strengthen Turkey's status of having one foot in Europe and one foot in the Near East.


Treathyl Fox's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:28 PM

Turkey described as a "bridge"?  Have often thought of it more like a "strategic safety pin".  But bridge is good!  Linking Europe and Asia?  It's an ambitious plan alright.  But I hope that it will be successful.  No doubt, Columbus, Marco Polo, and other explorers would have wanted it this way.  :)

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 9:46 PM

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:23 PM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:22 PM

I am amazed that the Chinese look up to anyone about anything.  They always seem to think that they reign supreme in just about everything and that they are the center of the universe.  To hear people say that they look up to South Korea for fasion and beauty is astounding.  China has the best of both worlds when it comes to history and modernity, and there are so many vibrant up and coming areas of China that it is shocking to see them look up to another country.

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

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Civil War Battles & Casualties

Civil War Battles & Casualties | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is just an amazing resource that tells the military side of the Civil War.  This war claimed more US casualties than World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam combined.  A great resource to use to show the geogaphy of the war, the theaters of war that were themost imortant and how the Union wanted to fight the war.  Watch the time lapse of the map and it will show the pattern of the conflict as the war progressed.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, November 18, 2013 1:11 PM

Awesome interactive map of Civil War battles

Arlis Groves's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:09 PM

This interactive map can be a helpful resource for details about battle casualties.

Teresa M. Nash's comment, November 28, 2013 2:20 AM
Awesome!
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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I mentioned this before in a previous scoop that just the location and the grographical make up of the Philippines is going to make this effort hard.  Not is this area made up of thousand of islands, but it is over 5300 miles from Hawaii, the main US Naval Base in the Pacific.  It is going to take time just to get there and time is not a something that can be wasted.  Once there to get the aid to where it is need they I think wil have to do like a military combat hosbital..triage.  Who needs the help first and most and the others will have to wait.  It will be impossible to help them all at the same time..the US and the world will try, its just not going to happen quickly.  Just look at how long it took New Orleans to get the full aid, and that was located literally in the US's own back yard!!!!

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just the remoteness of the area is going to hinder the relief efforts.  Even though the supplies are getting through it is getting through to the areas that need it the most is the problem.  When the infrastructure is not that good to begin with, the damage done by this kind of disaster is multiplied.  Look at New Orleans when Katrina hit.  It still took days for relief and just water to get where it was needed.  Imagine what that would have been like if the infrastructure was like like that of the Philippines.  The country is overwhelmed by this disaster and needs the help.  Its getting it but the problem still exists of how to distrbute it now that it is there.  Makes you wonder if Subic Bay was still open as a US military base if it would have made it easier.  Sometimes having a military base is not a bad thing.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It hard to report rape cases even here in the US.  It must be ten fold that in places like India, and much of the middle east, where women traditionally in thse areas of the world as always been in a lower status of men.  The women for years, for generations in fact have always been told that their place in lower than that of men. That if something happened to them it must be their fault.  However with globalization and access to the world as a whole, women, and the men, of these societies have been shown that this is not what it is like in the rest of the world.  The women do not have to accept what they have been told even though it has been drilled into their head over and over.  With women in India inceasing their percentage in the workforce, and being education this extreme situation is going to slowly change.  There have been alot of negative aspects of globalization, this however may well be one of the postive aspects of globalization, especially to the women in the areas of the world where this type of behavior is all too common. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:37 PM

It is hearting to see the police force in the modernized area taking such a strong stance. As the article showed it is greatly needed because the reason rape largely happens is because the traditional aspects of Indian culture continue on strongly in the village areas. These men were told for the longest time that women cannot amount to anything and for them to act free is wrong. This type of thinking is heavily engrained into the members of the society so they won’t just stop acting this way on their own accord. Arresting and convicting these men will send a message that their actions are not tolerated and aren’t right despite what they were taught.

 

 It also amazes me that this stance exists because the modernized area were also told these stories at one point too. The only explanation I have for the differences is that the more modernized areas are more welcoming of the freedoms seen in the West. To be clear though, the freedoms are more of a western trait. Thus globalization in this instance might have actually helped the positive result of the police force come about because of the positive influence seen in the Western countries economy and life style when they let women have more freedom.

 

Unfortunately, globalization can’t completely solve rape just yet. The article ends by asserting that to report rape “is a very difficult thing in the Indian context.” Yet, reporting rape anywhere is hard to do. In fact, the mention of 1 in 10 under reported rapes is a statistic similar to that of the United States. Similarly, many victims will refuse to cooperate or even contemplate taking their own life to avoid testimony (in fact many do). In either situation, most rape victims feel they lost their “honor.”  I am not sure when reporting rape or how reporting rape will ever become any easier. However whichever country can figure it out will need to show the rest of the world how. As I do look forward to the day that globalization could decrease rape on a large scale. 

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Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely?

Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Month after his meeting with Manmohan Singh, Nawaz Sharif said nuclear war is likely between India, Pakistan over Kashmir. He will meet Barack Obama in US.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Kashmir is still a hot spot in the world especially when thw two powers involved but have nuclear weapons and both seem willing to at least say they are still on the table in any conflict.  A long problem starting back when lines were drawn on the map by Imperial Britain.  Much like in Africa, however, nukes, at least as far as we know, are not on the table in Africa....yet.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:12 PM

Kashmir is a hot spot in the world  whith the two powers involved having nuclear weapons and both are willing say they are still on the table for a conflict.  

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Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods

Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tea plucking machines are threatening the livelihoods of tea pickers in the Indian state of Assam, reports Mark Tully.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

To modernize or not?  A great question.  Young people don't want to do this traditional work, it is expensive for the owners while others are using machines, the quality may be better, but the other brands are cheaper and selling more.  They exports have dropped becuase of the price of cheaper teas that don't have the same quality, but it seems that price is the more determining factor.  What is the owner to do?  If he changes and sells more his quality goes down, and a ton of people lose their jobs, however with less and less people willing to do the work...is it even necessary to keep this way???  A vicious circle..I think so.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 2014 4:42 AM

This article details how globalization is damaging the high-end tea industry of India. The Assam company, which produces high quality tea, is under pressure to mechanize their 100% human tea production due to competition. Vietnam, Kenya, and even other Indian companies produce significantly cheaper tea due to their willingness and ability to cut costs by using machines and paying their workers less. A cultural stigma toward tea workers is making hiring difficult for Assam, compounding the problems with competitors and forcing a switch to mechanization which will produce an inferior product.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:51 PM

This seems to work well for both the tea growers and the workers. The workers are compensated well and they have a job for life and the tea that is picked is of the highest quality. Unfortunately, most places on the planet go with the cheapest price, not the best quality, so I do not know how much longer this arrangement will be feasible.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:51 PM

In my town, we got rid of the old trash receptacle bins and in place we have one huge trash bin and one huge recycling bin. This has cut down the jobs immensely because now a machine just picks up the large bins. This is the same thing thats happening in India. There is now a machine that can do the humans jobs and will most likely take over for the tea picking people. Its unfortunate, but its how the world works.

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WWII Doolittle Raiders make final toast in Ohio

WWII Doolittle Raiders make final toast in Ohio | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The surviving members of Doolittle Raiders made a last toast to their fallen comrades with a bottle of 1896 cognac from Lt. Gen. James Doolittle himself.
Al Picozzi's insight:

One of the most iconic pictures of World War II when a B-25 takes off from the carrier USS Hornet to attack Toyko only moths after Peal Harbor.  With the war in Europe going bad at this stage and the Pacific War all going the way of the Japanese, this moral boost is what started the turn around.  These men knew this was really a one way mission, though most survived, but still did the impossible..attacked the Japanese at home.  This shocked the Japanese which caused them to divert more resources to protect the home islands at a time they could have been used elsewhere.  This was in April of 1942.  In May of 1942 the Japanese were stopped at the Battle of the Coral Sea and in June of 1942 the were decisively beaten at the Battle of Midway.  From that point on, until 1945 the Japanese were in retreat.  All of this started by men make a small but huge morale boosting raid on Toyko.  They should never be forgotten.

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Picture of the Day: Amsterdam from Above

Picture of the Day: Amsterdam from Above | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Amsterdam fans out south from the Amsterdam Centraal railway station. The oldest area of the town is known as de Wallen (the quays). Seen in the image above is the 17th century canal ring area of Amsterdam. The city has more than one hundred kilometres of canals, about 90 islands and 1,500 bridges. [Source]

 

Amsterdam is the capital and most populous city of the Netherlands with a population of 805,166 within the city-proper, 1,563,141 in the urban region and 2,349,870 in the greater metropolitan area. It is located in the province of North Holland in the west of the country. Originating as a small fishing village in the late 12th century, Amsterdam became one of the most important ports in the world during the Dutch Golden Age, a result of its innovative developments in trade. [Source]


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing picture.  Also amazing is the technolgy that was used in the 12th century to keep the ocean out of this beautiful place.  Imagine the cost of a project like that in today's dollars or Euros. 

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Mathijs Booden's comment, November 7, 2013 3:07 AM
The best thing about this view is the lack of high-rise buildings in the city centre.<br><br>@Al: the water body in the distance is not the ocean yet although it used to be. It's the Markerwaard, which is separated by two dikes from the North Sea and used to be a connected to the North Sea until early 20th century engineering efforts. The dike building was not directly aimed at protecting Amsterdam, but rather at reclaiming new land for agriculture. The Markerwaard (and IJsselmeer are now viewed as more important for recreation and water management and were never fully turned into polders.
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Sub-Saharan Africa (developing only) | Data

Sub-Saharan Africa (developing only) | Data | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a quick site that gives alot of data from the World Bank on this area of the world.  It really shows the differences of the countries in this same area and the disparity between these countries.

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Israel strikes Russian weapons shipment in Syria

Israel strikes Russian weapons shipment in Syria | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The attack was confirmed by an Obama administration official. The revelation came as Syria met a deadline to destroy chemical production facilities.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The situation is Syria is still in flux and very dangerous.  It seems that they are cooperating with the chemical weapon sanctions that the UN wants but they are still buying Russian weapons for Hezbollah.  Israel has struck before at weapons bound of Hezbollah from Syria.  The weapons are usually long range missles that Hezbollah can use against aircraft, ships and land targets fired from inside Syria.  State support terrorism..I think this shows it is still around.....

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