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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Hiding their idenity to get a job or to even live.  Much like many Jewish people did to survive in Hitler's Germany.  They pretened to be Catholic, Protestant anything but Jewish.  They did what they had to do to survive. The same is gong on in India, not on the scale of genocide, concentration camps, forced labor, etc., but it still is a form of opperession of a minority group in the largest "democracy" in the world.  It dates back to the partitiion of India after British rule.  Many Muslims were forced to migrated to what was then either West or East Pakistan, which is now Bangledesh.  Not all left.  There are about 127,000,000 Muslims in Indian manking it the second largest population of Muslims behind Indonesia, that is a sizeable minority even in a country of over 1 billion.  The nation overall would benefit from equality in the job maket in that there probably many skilled workers in a basically untouched labor pool.  The US has regulations against hiring practices based on one's religious belief, as well as age, gender, race etc., it is something that India might take an example from.  I know the US isn't perfect on its labor relations in the past, but we have been doing a good job as of late...though there are still lingering issues that will be solved giving time.  I tink its time for India to start becasue it will take a long time for things to change when they at least started.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 2015 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

One thing I bet most people did not know is that we get most of our foregin oil from Canada ans not an OPEC country at all.  This source really can help the US, but it does have drawbacks.  Expensive to refine, dangerous to ship in the proposed pipeline as it can corrode the pide easily.  Again seems a cost benefit analysis needs to be done, especailly with the US have large oil reserves in shale oil.  Is that source of oil cheaper to produce thereby growing domestic oil production??  Or is it cheaper to import the oil because of other considerations, like labor and environmental regulations?

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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:43 PM

The Keystone Pipeline is a pipeline bringing natural gas from Canada into the States. Many politicians are against the XL project to connect the pipeline from the Tar Sands in Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, there has been much rebuff from the Democrats within the Congress and the White House.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

We never heard about this during the Soviet Union as the news was controlled.  Also during the Soviet time I do not believe environmentalists would have gotton the chance to investigate the area.  With the fall of the USSR the world can now see some of the environmental effects that communism had on Russia.  These towns are built around the factory.  Much like the old steele towns in PA, like Allentown.  However Allentown chnaged with the times and is able to support, although it is difficult, the population that was focused on the steele industry.  Here is this remote area of Russia, there is nothing else in the area.  There is no service economy in the area, just the paper factory.  It has been kept open because of Putin who basically said to ignore all environmental laws and regulations and he made sure the environmental groups are not an issue anymore.  Not surprising from a former KGB Lt. Colonel and the Director of the FSB, the sucessor of the KGB.  To solve the issue in these monotowns I think there needs to be government intervention to transition the economies in theses areas.  To keep these factories running in the long run will just hurt all the people in the towns with no end in sight.  However, I do not think this will happen unless there is a change in the leadership of Russia, something I do not think will happen anytime soon.

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:31 PM

This mill on Lake Biakal was created in the soviet era. This was created and made a increasing well place to work with the promise of a bright future for its workers. Instead when it comes to the post soviet era its a failing community. Not because of the workers but because of the era that they live in. The age of environmentalists. because of this the mill and its workers are suffering. Many of the people that had moved there to work in the mill in the 60's with a promise of a bright future. However today the people who originally moved there and the descendents are paying the price for the soviet promise. If the mill were to forever close then the people of the area would basically have no life and future. They wouldnt even have enough money to move out of look for jobs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:28 PM

Seeing this video and the lack of human development in this small town is astounding. They are destroying a lake and the environment about them, they do not care though. Unfortunately, they have to not care about the environment, they are so desperate for work to make money to live and support themselves and family, that they are willing to do what it takes to keep their jobs at the mill. The workers and citizens of the area know about the consequences of the pollution, they know it needs to be taken care of, but with the depravity they have, they have to. They are faced with a situation no one want to be in... work and destroy the environment so they have money to live, or be without life necessities. 

Louis Helyes's curator insight, October 10, 2016 2:12 PM

This video talks about a paper mill in Russia. It is saying that environmentalists are pressuring the mill to close down due to the environmental impact that the paper mill is doing to the surrounding area, such as killing the crops, trees and plants. It also talks about them losing their jobs because they may be unable to find other jobs in their area.

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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like time are changing.  As Mexico becomes more business friendly and with cheap labor and less government regulations more and more people, as well as businesses are going to go there.  NAFTA only increases this more.  Mexico is in the perfect position literally. Right next to the United States and closer to Europe than China dramatically lowers transportation costs, which in turn leads to greater profits for the company.  This will eventually lead to more jobs and great opportunity in Mexico, both for Mexicans and people immegrating into Mexico.  As NAFTA takes hold and the economy so sluggish in the US, rising costs in China, and with the EU have economic crisis after economic crisis, it seems for the the time the Mexico is the place where you want to do business.

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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Watch the whole episode.  Interesting about the process that is done and interesting to watch where the factories are located.

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Madison Roth's curator insight, January 20, 2017 7:58 PM
This video relates to my current AP human geography class because we are learning about industries and it is speaking of the coke industry. This, more specifically, is a bulk-gaining industry and is placed strategically based on all factors (situation and site). I think that the coca-cola industries are growing rapidly as stated in the video. Also, that the plants are placed nicely (closer to consumers to avoid transportation costs) taking into consideration the amount of coke needed to be produced and the countless factories relative to each other.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, January 20, 2017 8:03 PM
  This is related to world cultural geography by being an industry. A industry is a economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories. Coca Cola is a huge industry that makes billions of dollars a year, 1.6 billion people reaches for a coca cola a day! This industry is a bulk gaining industry, the ingredients don't weight that much but when you put it all together it weighs quite a lot because of this the transportation cost would be to great for going a long distance so they must be closer to the markets instead of the inputs. This article is mostly about how Coca Cola is made and about all the factories worldwide to meet their growing demand.   
Rebecca Cooler's curator insight, January 20, 2017 9:45 PM
This article relates to the topic because in human geography industries are described as either bulk gaining or bulk reducing. My opinion on the topic is that this would be a bulk gaining industry because it's adding bulk.
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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 3:28 AM
This interactive map of the fifty largest ports in the world is very revealing. It tells us that there has been a shift in the global economy from centered around Atlantic trade to Pacific trade. The eight largest ports are all located in East or Southeast Asia, showing a massive growth in Asia's economies over just a few decades.
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Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing

Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
With the slight resurgence of U.S. manufacturing in the recent years—termed a potential "manufacturing moment" by some—it is important to consider not just the future of manufacturing in America but also its geography.

 

This interactive map is brimming with potential to both teach and learn about the changing industrial geographies of the United States.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that there still is manufacturing in the US given all the news about it moving to China and other countries.  As the map shows there still is big manufacturing in east of the Mississippi and then manily along the West Coast.  I really thing the US as a whole needs to get back to basics.  Manufacturing is what made this country strong, and I believe that a strong manufacturing sector with a strong services sector will help this country grow.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  With no saftey regulations to go by, nor any labor unions to file greviences for bad working conditions, and unsafe for that matter, its no wonder they can be on budget and of course this will give them a competitive edge.  If they can do it cheaper it will cost less than anyone else can do it for, and everyone knows governments will always go the cheapest route.  The labor cost is so much lower in China, think no safety regulaitons or government watchdog like OSHA, that it is cheaper to make it there and ship it across the globe.  They really have no regard for worker safety in any industry, this video just shows that even in construction, or destruction, there is no concern for the workers...interesting coming from a Communist country where the worker was supposed to be the most important person, over the capitalists.  Hmmm makes you think....

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Alexis Rickey's curator insight, April 7, 2:20 PM
This youtube clip captures an incredibly hazardous situation involving Chinese constructions workers. In the video, a contruction worker hops on the end of an excavator and dangles over nearly five stories of a dangerous construction zone on the top of a vacant building to sets off an explosive to help the building crumble. This video makes you question the legality of the labor force in China: What are the safety violations, if any, that were violated while performing this concerning task? Are the workers covered/ insured for work-place injuries? How frequent are these dangerous tasks performed? Is the cheap and hazardous labor the main reasons that China is has one of the highest global economies in the world? These are just a few questions that came to mind after watching the video. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 12:06 PM
This mentality towards worker safety is why the United States cannot compete with Chinese labor costs. The blatant disregard for safety as seen in the video allows Chinese manufacturers and industry to focus on reaching as high a level of production as possible. In a way, workers are seen as expendable parts to the entire process. Combine that with the low wages paid to these workers have allowed the country to develop in an incredibly short period of time. By disregarding worker safety, China has a massive edge over more developed nations with strict worker safety regulations.
Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 12:31 PM
This video shows why China gets stuff done for so much cheaper than other countries in the world.  Worker safety and workplace safety is non-existent which is why jobs get done for so much cheaper in China.