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Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs

Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Getting someting from the old gold-rush era miners.  The rare earth elements are in high demand today becasue of the use of these elements in modern technology.  Old gold mine are being examined to be reopened as rare earth element mine.  China at the moment is the largest miner of these elements and are charging a ton of money for them.  According to the article they cut off supplies of some to Japan because of a dispute over international fishing rights.  Along with oil, are these resources going to drive the future economies?  It looks like if you like smart phones and electric cars they will be.

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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Regional Geography
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Colombia's gold rush

Colombia's gold rush | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Gold fever is sweeping across South America and is at its most lethal in Colombia where it is fuelling the civil war.

 

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The war has now shifted from Cocaine to Gold.  Seems that alot of the planters when from planting cocaine to mining for gold...illegally according to the Columbian government.  The government is taking land from the native people and taking for themselves in order to get big business, especially foregin owned ones, to invest in their country.  Does it south familar.  It should.  1874, Black Hills in the then Dakota territory of the US.  Seems gold was found on Native American land..an expedition led by George Armstrong Custer confirmed gold was there...which led to..native Americans being forefully moved from their land into the Montana territory..which eventully led to the 1876 Great Sioux War in which Custer was killed and eventaully the Sioux and the Lakota and the Cheyenne being defeated by 1877.  Seems there is a parallel going on in South America.  Looks like the old axiom of those that do not learn history are doomed to repeat it proves itself correct again.

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Derek Ethier's comment, September 30, 2012 6:57 PM
This is a sad yet all too occurring phenomenon in underdeveloped nations. In Africa, they fight Civil Wars over minerals like oil and coltan. Here the fight is over gold. When government is unable to control militant groups, they take control over natural resources using violence. It is also unfortunate that international companies are coming in to sweep up the wealth. Colombia is unlikely to keep too much of this wealth in their own nation.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 10:30 PM
Colombia's gold mines are bringing out greed in all nations. Civilian wars are breaking out over the gold. Native people are scared and fleeing their homes. The Colombian government has to watch closely over who is working the mines. The government does not want miners without licenses in the mines, because the government will not be paid royalties on the gold.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:58 AM

In countries where the government is not as stable as most, the demand for gold makes people willing to literally go to war over mines in Colombia. In the 1990s there was a large outrage about "blood diamonds" out of Africa. This reminds me of that. In the developing world we are seeing horrible circumstances arising to gain wealth and provide a valuable commodity to the highest bidders. 

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Als Return to Education
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Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs

Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:13 PM

Getting someting from the old gold-rush era miners.  The rare earth elements are in high demand today becasue of the use of these elements in modern technology.  Old gold mine are being examined to be reopened as rare earth element mine.  China at the moment is the largest miner of these elements and are charging a ton of money for them.  According to the article they cut off supplies of some to Japan because of a dispute over international fishing rights.  Along with oil, are these resources going to drive the future economies?  It looks like if you like smart phones and electric cars they will be.