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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing the amout of people Stalin sent to the gulags as politucal prisoners.  He even sent his own soldiers to them if they were captured and held in German POWs camps.  He though with them just evein seeing the west would lessen his hold.  Completely changed the ethnic geography of Soviet Russia

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:37 PM

This graph represents the areas where many of the Chechnes had been displaced to in the era of Stalins regime. Many of these people were displaced from their homes and forced to move. Many of them either had to leave family behind of they were forced to move together and had no initial home to live in.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:51 PM

i see this as history retelling itself. for some reason throughout history terrible men think that their race is better than another, this is not true and if a person wants to think this that is their prerogative, but some men think it to such an extent that they seek to eliminate the entire other people. nothing good can come of this and it turns into mass conflict every time. it destroys countries and breeds hate on all sides.

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:00 PM

Uighurs are being pushed out of their homeland because of Han Chinese migration. This article is accurate when it claims that the amount of publicity the region gets is minimum. This makes the Uighurs more at risk than Tibet. With so much attention put on areas elsewhere, China will face less international push back as it over takes yet another region who wishes to maintain its autonomy and culture.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:54 PM

I believe that without doubt today it is a bad time to be a minority in China. The Chinese are experiencing a great deal of nationalism and in turn placing economic barriers on the minorities in order to drive them out of regions so the government will be able to repopulate them with Han Chinese. While the Han Chinese have always been the majority within China its only recently the government has decided to provide them with advancement at the risk of the other ethnic groups within China. 

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.