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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The use of this commerical to promote a reunification is a great idea.  It starts as a small step and then ideas just grow.  As this gets more play in India, the idea spreads and in a country of over 1 billion when it spreads...it spreads.  Reminds me of Berlin. A city so long ago split and then reunited in 1989 with the physical wall mainly coming down in 1990 and then Germany reuniting in 1990.  It started small over time, 30 years or so.  Now I know India and Pakistan were split in 1947 and Germany effectively in 1945 witht he wall coming up in 1961.  This is a bit different I know, the division is mainly on religious differences, however it usually takes small actions for things to get started.  Will a reunifiction happenin my lifetime, no, in my kids....maybe.  Is this commerical for Google that one small step?

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 2016 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Im old enough to remember this conflict when Thatcher sent the British to retake the islands.  Both sides are claiming the islands for themselves.  Seems they were uninhabited when discovered by the French and then it was British, Spanish, French, Argentinan, and British again in 1833 until the militray invasion by Agrentina in 1982 and the retaking of the island by the British that same year.  Claims on both sides seem legitimate, but I find it most telling that the people now living there want to be part of Great Britian, not Argentina.  The people of mainland Argentina might want the islands, economic reasons and for the EEZ, but the people actully living on the island do not.  Another thing I do remember, the US was not with Great Britian at thie time in an unusual split between long term and stanuch allies

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.

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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

Via Seth Dixon
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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

These border towns should be getting some help from the federal government.  They handle ther calls of all the border medical emergencies from immigrants, both legal and illegal, and from people who left the US to live better in Mexico, but return to the US for medical care and suffer an "event" at the border to get to the hospital faster.  It also hurts the towns own citizens as sometimes these small towns only have one emergency vechile to do all the calls.  Maybe they should be given a grant to expand their emergency services since alot of the calls they take are from a federal source, ie border control.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:05 PM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 2014 4:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 2015 1:18 PM

After reading this article I think there should be some type of health service at the border, using the fire trucks and ambulance as a taxi is unacceptable. If people crossing the border do not have health care as stated that some done, the ambulance and fire trucks should not have to cover the cost, money should be given to those fire stations across the border and without help the departments might run into some trouble.

 In San Diego more than half of the calls that the department receives comes from the port which is equivalent to the state borders. Are people seriously that desperate for a way to get across the border quicker? 

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The weird, violent history of the Indo-Pakistani border.

 

Geography rarely makes sense without the added lens of history.  This fantastic article chonicles the history of the geopolitical conflict between India and Pakistan, centering on the disputed Kashmir region.  This border is tied into colonial, cultural, political and religious layers of identity.  As one of the great unresolved issues of the colonial era, this standoff may loom large as India becomes increasingly significant on the global scale.     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

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Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely?

Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Month after his meeting with Manmohan Singh, Nawaz Sharif said nuclear war is likely between India, Pakistan over Kashmir. He will meet Barack Obama in US.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Kashmir is still a hot spot in the world especially when thw two powers involved but have nuclear weapons and both seem willing to at least say they are still on the table in any conflict.  A long problem starting back when lines were drawn on the map by Imperial Britain.  Much like in Africa, however, nukes, at least as far as we know, are not on the table in Africa....yet.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:12 PM

Kashmir is a hot spot in the world  whith the two powers involved having nuclear weapons and both are willing say they are still on the table for a conflict.  

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Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -Bangladesh border

Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -Bangladesh border | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
. Well, I was just random surfing through the internet, when i came to know about this strange border arrangement between India and bangladesh.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow, this area is just like those Russian wooden dolls, one within another within another.  Found out from this article that there are 100's of these on the border between India nad Bangladesh.  This arrangement needs to be resloved to help the people it is affecting the most, the farmers.  There seems to be a deal in place, butt he issue is still unresolved.

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

If you take a look back at history, the only people to ever sucessfully conquer Afghanistan were the Mongols.  The rugged, mountainous terrain made this plac hard to live in and hard to control.  The Mongols were a very mobile people and were able to control the area by aslo being very tolerant of the natives.  Eventually it bacame hard to notice the difference between a Mongol and a native Afghan, they assimilated the Mongols. 

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 2015 2:59 PM

In this video Jennifer L. Fluri explains the borders of Afghanistan. At first Afghanistan was used as a border outline between Russia and British India. The border facing India was named the Durand line, after Sir Durand, who convinced the leader of Afghanistan to respect the line.  There is Iranian/Persian influence in Afghanistan also with the celebration of Nowruz, the Iranian/Persian New Year. That is because Southern Afghanistan was part of Iran in 1502-1736, under the Safavid Empire. Also Dari is one of the main languages spoken in Afghanistan which came from Persia. She ends the video saying “where Afghanistan is today both culturally and geopolitically has to do with their geography”

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:15 AM

Afghanistan's current borders are the result of political maneuvering between empires. Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor is a result of this political maneuvering. The corridor was created in order to prevent the Russian Empire and British India from sharing a common border. While many afghans may decry the notion, Afghanistan has been shaped by foreign influence. The same can be said for almost every other nation on the globe. Almost all borders are determined by some from of political maneuvering. Our borders with Mexico and Canada have been determined through treaties and wars.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 12:24 PM

As I have learned more about the world, it's been interesting to see how arbitrary national borders can sometimes be. I think we are taught in school to associate "nations" with "nationalism," and although that is generally the case for most industrialized nations (whose citizens generally feel they are "nationals" within their own borders), it is not always true for the rest of the world. We see this in the numerous ethnic disputes in African nations, in the violent Yugoslav wars in Europe, and today with the Kurd uprising in Syria and Iraq- we see ill-defined borders that do not meet the needs of their peoples, nations that do not encompass the same sentiments of nationalism. As a result, we see indifference between these various peoples at best, or open conflict between varying ethnic and ideological groups at worst. Afghanistan as we know it today is not the result of self-determination or a sense of nationalism, but geopolitical jockeying between Russia and the United Kingdom. It is not a nation, but a political buffer.

As a result, Afghanistan does not act as a single nation- it may have a central government, but that government is incredibly weak, and people in remote areas often do not even know of its existence. Afghanistan is a series of small city-states and even more isolated settlements clumped together behind arbitrarily drawn lines, living their lives in much the same manner their ancestors did 1,000 years ago. This has made the mountainous, isolated regions of the nation a haven for terrorists and religious extremism, posing a serious issue in the region that, despite billions of dollars and a decade of fighting, the US has been unable to find a solution for. Divided amongst itself, Afghanistan is a nation in name only, something that the West likes to place on the map because of a dispute between two global powers nearly 2 centuries ago.

 

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 10:37 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:06 PM

500 birthdays were taken away due to an international date line. In Samoa is in a confused state between the united states and the Asian pacific side of the timeline which would cause time and dates to be confusing.Dynamic economic networks and political allegiances have created a very difficult situation for the people near the border in Samoa.  The International Date line in Samoa is something that is needed to be watched and paid attention because it can affect people in ways that can be very significant even at a small tiny rate.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another showing that the trend of illegal immigration is on the decline, even as Congress still is looking for ways to pass an immigration reform bill.  With the US economic problems, post 9/11 tightening of the US border and new labor laws whcih make it difficult to hire people who are considered illegal, plus other factors have led to less and less Mexicans coming to the US.  With NAFTA finally beginning to have a postivie effect in Mexico, more foregin companies are investing in Mexico with its low labor and low transportation costs to the US.  This leads to better and more jobs in Mexico and an economic boom, which it turn allows for better education for Mexican citizens at home.  People from the US are following some of these jobs and they are heading into Mexico as a change in pace from the other way around. 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".