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NMSU Wildlife Society tests for chronic wasting disease in Sacramento Mountains - Las Cruces Sun-News

NMSU Wildlife Society tests for chronic wasting disease in Sacramento Mountains - Las Cruces Sun-News | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
NMSU Wildlife Society tests for chronic wasting disease in Sacramento Mountains Las Cruces Sun-News Members of the Wildlife Society student chapter at New Mexico State University are committed to a world where humans and animals coexist by ensuring...
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Tests are being done for chronic wasting diseases in the Sacramento Mountains. During this time is where hunters aim and start to begin their hunting season. But sadly there is something far more deadly than just hunters. A chronic waste disease, members of the wildlife Society at New Mexico State University are committed to a world where there are humans and animals that are coexist by ensuring that the disease doesn’t spread. What is the chronic waste disease, how are we preparing for this disease, and what is caused by this disease? 

 

The chronic waste disease was found in an area used by a hunter. Hunters are fully ware that they are suppose to leave the spinal column and brain parts of the deer in the unit to prevent spreading diseases. Students in the society have run and conducted stations throughout the weekend in the Sacramento Mountains. The tissue of the lymph node is samples that are taken from the animals that have been tested for the disease.

 

We should be preparing for the chronic waste disease. Personnel give students training from the New Mexico Game and fish during their monthly meetings. Each student begins to test the deer and elk for chronic waste disease. The money for the students is also used to get the professional experience while doing this. Most importantly they are made to make contact with personnel from the New Mexico and Fish game.

 

Chronic waste disease is similar to the mad cow disease, which is a contagious neurological disease that affects deer, elk, and moose. Which causes a spongy degeneration of the brains of infected animals that results in emaciation, and abnormal behavior. That also includes loss of the body functions and death. The wildlife society is currently on a $5,000 contract with the New Mexico Game and fish to test tissue samples of deer and elk for chronic waste disease.

 

The Chronic waste disease is an issue for hunters. Hunters now need to check what they’re hunting for now often and doing the correct task each time. So the Chronic waste disease doesn’t spread. It is most common in deer, elk, and moose.

 

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Government bans grazing in parks over poaching

Government bans grazing in parks over poaching | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
The government has banned grazing of livestock in national parks and game reserves to curb poaching http://t.co/OIMVo6l0Cw
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If anyone is found grazing animals in the conservation areas, they will face the law and ordered herders to drive the animals out of the parks reserves. The government is against the grazing of cattle in the parks since it is encouraged to poach elephants and rhinos. Poachers are masquerading as herders which have killed elephants in the Taita-Taveta ranches which are in the Tsavo conservation area. "We cannot allow crooks to kill our wildlife which are a major attraction." Their is many different places throughtout the worl facing this promblem, and its about time the government and the law has stepted in to stop this promblem. 

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FDA: 30 million pounds of antibiotics given to conventional livestock annually

FDA: 30 million pounds of antibiotics given to conventional livestock annually | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
FDA: 30 million pounds of antibiotics given to conventional livestock annually (FDA: 30 million pounds of antibiotics given to conventional livestock annually.
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The FDA is establishing guidelines for the use of antibiotics in livestock. Recently they have been putting roughly 30 million pounds of these types of drugs down their throats. A rise in animal antibiotics has been on the rise since 2000s.  An infographic is a non-profit public policy group that illustrates a steady rise in the animal use of antibiotics, which has been in use since 2000. FDA put out a new guidance last year that you may or may not be aware of that advises meat and poultry producers to curb antibiotic use in livestock.

 

Human antibiotic has been leveled off at about 8 million pounds. Livestock farms have been sucking in more and more each day from the drugs each year. Consumption has reached a record for nearly 29.9 million pounds in 2011. The livestock industry is now consuming nearly four-fifths of the antibiotics used in the U.S. Human antibiotics are decreasing, while animal antibiotics is increasing.

 

Feeding antibiotics to animals can be harmful, the biggest issue rather than the harm from the drug is that can they cause harm to humans who consume tainted meat. Antibiotics for many years has led to the inception of bacteria strains, or also known as superbugs. Those no longer respond to antibiotic treatments. The bugs are increasingly plaguing conventional meat and poultry products, which I didn’t mention the hospital’s and other healthcare’s that treat individuals. The use of antibiotics is on the rise, but there are harmful bacteria that can harm the animals in a fear.

 

American supermarkets have seen a dramatic increase in the number of superbugs. As much as 78 percent, that’s been tested of conventional ground turkey and 75 percent of all tested convention chicken breast has been found to be at least one strain of Salmonella to antibiotics. But about half of turkey samples were found to be three or more strains of Salmonella. The FDA is taking action to end the practice of pumping livestock with antibiotics. The purpose is to make them grow faster and boost industry profits. 

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Monday midday cash livestock markets

Monday midday cash livestock markets | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
As expected on Mondays, cattle country is very quiet with the main item of business the collection of the week’s showlists.
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DTN reports that hog and pork slaughter are more than 10% under the comparable average. Cattle country are usually the main business in the collection of the weekly showlist. In the Southern States are marked at 123. While the north is ranged 194-195 and are a steady to the bulk the previous week of business. The pork carcass is valued at 3.28 lower at 94.88 FOB plant on a negotiated basis. 

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