Alpine Tundra
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Learn More: Unique Characteristics

Learn more about how plants of the alpine tundra are uniquely adapted to survive in harsh growing conditions and discover some abiotic characteristics that make alpine tundras special!

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because I felt like it was an excellent wrap-up video on some basic characteristics of Alpine Tundras that would tie any loose strings concerning plant, animal, and general characteristics and wrap up the biome as a whole in a neat package.

The video was uploaded in 2009, fairly recent, so the source has Currency. As far as Relevancy, Barton Stan describes plants in alpine tundra areas in depth, which is exactly what I was looking for. The video is on the University of Wyoming's channel, so the information has Authority, provided by a university. The information is given with accompanying videos and pictures, so the information is given Accuracy. The Purpose of the video is to educate students on plant characteristics in alpine tundra areas using one of Wyoming's as an example.

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Arctic Tundra: A Short Introduction

Arctic Tundra: A Short Introduction | Alpine Tundra | Scoop.it

Gain a general understanding of what an alpine (or mountain) tundra is.

Haris R's insight:

I chose this resource because it does a great job of familiarizing someone without prior knowledge of Alpine Tundras with some general definitions and characteristics.

The online magazine article is pretty Current since it was published in 2013. It goes into detail about the Alpine Tundra, meaning it does give a brief overview and introduction to Alpine Tundras, and is thus Relevant. As for Authority, National Geographic is an accredited magazine, distributed and read worldwide, so the article has plenty. The information consists of measures of temperatures and descriptive explanations, so the article is Accurate. The Purpose is to inform and educate about Alpine Tundras.

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Animal and Plant Characteristics

Learn about how the alpine tundra's unique assortment of plants and animals have adapted to the sometimes unforgiving conditions attributed to the biome.

Haris R's insight:

I chose to use this video because it is extremely, extremely informative, but not in a monotone, boring way and it really drives information about animal and plant characteristics across well.

The video is very Current since it was uploaded in 2013, meaning the information discussed in the video is still very applicable to the world today. The video is very Relevant as Rob Nelson does a great job of explaining both the animal and plant characteristics of the Alpine Tundra in great detail, giving me the information I needed. Rob Nelson, the speaker in the video, is an ecologist who travels the world studying biomes, so the video has a lot of Authority behind it. The entire video is supported with visuals of an actual alpine tundra, so everything he discusses is presented, proving the video to be very Accurate. Finally, the Purpose of the video is to inform aspiring ecologists or even just individuals interested in alpine tundras.

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Limiting Factors

Explore what factors may limit biodiversity or population growth in alpine tundras and why.

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because it is very detailed on some limiting factors present in alpine tundras, in-depth discussion illuminating a deeper understanding of the biome as a whole.

The source site is very Current, since it was last updated in 2014; the information is fresh, recent, and applicable to the world today. The source has a lot of Relevancy through its in-depth explanation of limiting factors in alpine tundras, pertaining to exactly what I'm trying to teach other students. The National Park Service posted the article on their website, meaning it has plenty of Authority -- the ".gov" URL further solidifies its Authority. The information is Accurate because it includes a thorough case study-esque chart of quantitative and qualitative observations in the Rocky Mountain area. Lastly, the Purpose of the article is to inform readers about Alpine Tundras.

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Climate and Soil Characteristics

Climatology of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone at a Maritime Subarctic-Alpine Site, Mealy Mountains, Labrador
Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because of its quantitative representation of some important biome characteristics, its graphs and charts providing a complete picture of alpine tundras.

The study was conducted from 2001 to 2009, and the journal itself has a volume published in 2014, so this is very Current. Data was collected from an alpine tundra region, meaning it does pertain to what I am interested in learning, and is thus Relevant. The abstract is on the Arctic Institute of North America's website, and I was originally directed from GREENR to find the journal, so the source has evident Authority. The information is supported by data collected by John D. Jacobs, Sarah Chan, and Elizabeth Sutton, three scientists, so the information is Accurate. The Purpose of the study was to learn about trends in climate patterns in alpine tundra biomes. 

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Location Distribution

Read about (and see) how Alpine Tundra is distributed across the earth and see some cool pictures of the animals and plants that call the unique biome their home. (Password: lonestar)

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because the abundance of photographs and maps are the cherry on the top of the wealth of information it provides about alpine tundra locations and their pattern of occurrence on Earth.

The article was published in 2004, which is pretty Current. The information is Relevant, appropriate, and pertains to my goal of learning more Alpine Tundras. The section has plenty of Authority, as it is part of an encyclopedia titled "Our Living World: Earth's Biomes" which was found using GVRL. Coming from an encyclopedia, the information is very Accurate, holding an informative tone and providing accompanying photographs. The Purpose of the source is to inform about tundras in general as well as distinguish between Arctic and Alpine Tundras.

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Learn More: Unique Characteristics

Learn more about how plants of the alpine tundra are uniquely adapted to survive in harsh growing conditions and discover some abiotic characteristics that make alpine tundras special!

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because I felt like it was an excellent wrap-up video on some basic characteristics of Alpine Tundras that would tie any loose strings concerning plant, animal, and general characteristics and wrap up the biome as a whole in a neat package.

The video was uploaded in 2009, fairly recent, so the source has Currency. As far as Relevancy, Barton Stan describes plants in alpine tundra areas in depth, which is exactly what I was looking for. The video is on the University of Wyoming's channel, so the information has Authority, provided by a university. The information is given with accompanying videos and pictures, so the information is given Accuracy. The Purpose of the video is to educate students on plant characteristics in alpine tundra areas using one of Wyoming's as an example.

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Alpine Tundra Distribution Worldwide

Alpine Tundra Distribution Worldwide | Alpine Tundra | Scoop.it

See the distribution of alpine tundras for yourself!

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because it's a great visual of what kind of areas would meet the requirements of an alpine tundra. I pulled this map from one of the sources on this Scoop, so I'll reiterate my CRAAP Test for that:

The article was published in 2004, which is pretty Current. The information is Relevant, appropriate, and pertains to my goal of learning more Alpine Tundras. The section has plenty of Authority, as it is part of an encyclopedia titled "Our Living World: Earth's Biomes" which was found using GVRL. Coming from an encyclopedia, the information is very Accurate, holding an informative tone and providing accompanying photographs. The Purpose of the source is to inform about tundras in general as well as distinguish between Arctic and Alpine Tundras.

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Human-Related Issues and Importance to Humans

Learn about how human development leads to environmental degradation and fragmentation in Alpine Tundras and dangers it poses. Also, observe how the alpine tundra harbors biodiversity that is important for humans to preserve.

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because it highlights exactly how humans, affecting alpine tundras through development and intervention, can cause quite adverse consequences for the biome.

The article was published in 2014, meaning it is extremely Current and representative of environmental issues facing Alpine Tundras in the present. It has Relevancy, descriptively explaining how human activities pose a threat to alpine tundras and directly connects to my needed knowledge. The article is posted on the WWF.org, or World Wild Life.org, a reputable organization known for working against environmental issues, not only making it a reliable source but also making it a practical source for learning about environmental issues. The information is Accurate, seen in its  analytic descriptions of specific areas that need to be addressed in the Yukon region. The Purpose of the article is to evaluate the condition of the Interior Yukon-Alaska Alpine Tundra and highlight how humans have affected it.

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Net Primary Productivity (Abstract)

Although the information may be hard to digest from the case study, the main idea to depart with is that alpine tundras generally have a low net primary productivity due to climate, air pressure, and minimal rainfall.

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because of how specifically it focused on a single alpine tundra region, thus being able to provide very detailed and insightful information about Net Primary Productivity in the biome.

The case study was published in 1992, so although it may not be extremely recent, it is still not too old, giving it relative Currency. The case study provides useful information about Net Primary Productivity and it is absolutely Relevant, as that was exactly what I was looking for. JSTOR is a reputable online database, plus the study was conducted by professors of botany in India, meaning it has Authority. Solid data presented allows the case study to be Accurate and backed up with evidence, all measured and recorded by the four professors carefully. Finally the Purpose of the case study is to study is to look at patterns of phytomass and net primary production in Alpine Tundras.

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A Little Extra: Changing Tundras in the West

Read this lab report on the disappearance of Alpine Tundras in Western America if you're interested!

Haris R's insight:

I chose this source because its really interesting information about how entire alpine tundra regions are undergoing change as the global climate does.

The lab report was published in 2007, meaning it is pretty Current and its information is still applicable to the world today. It has a lot of Relevancy by directly pertaining to the subject matter of alpine tundras and their environmental damages, providing further knowledge to myself and hopefully others about the tundras. The report was published at the Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, meaning the facility and researchers give the lab report a lot of Authority and credibility. The data collected and presented in a number of different graphs is a clear indication of Accurate information, carefully collected, recorded, analyzed, and discussed. Finally, the overall Purpose of the lab report was to conduct research on the effect of climate change on the Koppen Alpine Tundra.

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Work Cited

"Alpine Tundra Biome Explained." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2014."Alpine Tundra." WorldWildlife.org. World Wildlife Fund, n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2014."Climatology of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone at a Maritime Subarctic-Alpine Site, Mealy Mountains, Labrador | Jacobs | ARCTIC." Climatology of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone at a Maritime Subarctic-Alpine Site, Mealy Mountains, Labrador | Jacobs | ARCTIC. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2014."Defining Arctic and Alpine Tundra." Gale Virtual Reference Library. N.p., n.d. Web.Diaz, Henry F., and Jon K. Eischeid. "Disappearing “Alpine Tundra” Köppen Climatic Type in the Western United States." Geophysical Research Letters 34.18 (2007): n. pag. Web."Phytomass and Primary Productivity in Several Communities of a Central Himalayan Alpine Meadow, India." N.p., n.d. Web."Tundra -- National Geographic." National Geographic. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Dec. 2014.United States. National Park Service. "Alpine Tundra Ecosystem." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 08 Dec. 2014. Web. 10 Dec. 2014."Wyoming's Alpine Tundra." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.
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