Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing
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Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing
The Battle of the Sky
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The Allan H. Lockheed Page of the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register Website

The Allan H. Lockheed Page of the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register Website | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Allan H. Lockheed was born on January 20, 1889 in Niles, California. His parents were John and Flora Loughead. Lockheed got his interest in aviation through working for his half brother Victor. Victor worked as an engineer at an early aviation firm where he got Allan involved with installing a motor on a glider in 1910. Allan Lockheed got dared to fly this glider so he followed up and flew it at the Hawthorne Race Track in Chicago. He and his brother, Malcolm, later built their first airplane in 1913 and called it the Model G. They used this plane to take people on rides for $10 an hour. Eventually, they started the Loughead Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1915; however Malcolm left in 1919 to go work on hydraulic automobile brakes. Allan, on the other hand, decided to keep running this new aircraft company and persevere as a businessman.

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Lockheed Martin · History

Lockheed Martin · History | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Glen L. Martin started out in Los Angeles, California, starting the Glen. L Martin Company on August 16, 1912. He built his fist plane in a rented church with some advice from Orville Wright. On December 19, 1912, Allan and Malcolm Lockheed founded the Alco Hydro-Aeroplane Company. They built seaplances in a garage and later named their company the Lockheed Aircraft Company. Later, in 1995, their companies merged into Lockheed Martin. Because of these two men's vision, they were able to conquer any obstacles that arose and let their company thrive. 

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National Aviation Hall of Fame - Allan Lockheed

National Aviation Hall of Fame - Allan Lockheed | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Allan and Malcolm Lockheed built their first plane in 1913. It was called the Model G. This plane was not sold but instead was used to start an aerial sightseeing business. The company did start selling aircraft but went bankrupt in 1920. The governemt was selling war-surplus aircraft really cheap and Lockheed just could not compete. Lockheed made it out but then went bankrupt again in 1932 due to the stock market crash. Allan Lockheed did not give up, however, and formed the Alcor Aircraft Corporation in 1937. This company failed, though, after a terrible test flight. Lockheed continued to design aircraft and became the general manager of a company in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Later in life, Allan Lockheed got in to real estate and continued consulting for Lockheed Aircraft Corporation. Lockheed eventually died in Supelveda, California in 1969

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Lockheed Martin · Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin · Lockheed Martin | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Lockheed Martin is now a global security and aerospace company. Its headquarters is in Bethesda, Maryland where it is lead by Chairman and CEO Robert J. Stevens. Lockheed Martin is the largest provider of IT services, systems integration, and training to the U.S. Government. The 2011 sales reached $46.5 billion and currently has $80.7 billion in backlog orders.

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Boeing: William E. Boeing -- 1881 to 1956

Boeing: William E. Boeing -- 1881 to 1956 | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

William Boeing is the son of Wilhelm and Marie Boeing. He was born in Detroit, MI on October 1, 1881. Wilhelm Boeing was from a well-to-do family back in Hohenlimburg, Germany but his drive for adventure led him to move to the United States in 1868. Wilhelm purchased timberlands in Minnesota. This estate was valued at $1 million and was left to William after both parents passed away.

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HistoryLink.org - Boeing, William Edward (1881-1956)

HistoryLink.org - Boeing, William Edward (1881-1956) | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

After William Boeing's father died, he was sent to numerous boarding schools around the world and eventaully entered Yale University in the engineering department. He was there for two years and then dropped out because he "felt the time was right to acquire timber." He moved to Washington state to start his lumber business even though he did not know much about business or timbering. He found his passion for flying at America's first International Air Meet where he enthusiastically asked Louis Paulhan for a ride. Boeing waited four days for a ride but Paulhan left before they could go up. He eventually got a plane ride form Terah Maroney five years later. After that ride, Boeing went to the Glenn L. Martin Flying School and  bought a plane. When World War I broke out, Boeing became an advocate for National Preparedness and even flew over a University of Washington football game and dropped a cardboard "bomb" on the field. Boeing partnered with Conrad Westervelt and founded the company that is now known as Boeing Airplane Company. During World War I, the company was kept alive by building furniture and speedboats as well as with military and naval contracts. In 1925, Congress gave up on the Post Office flying the mail around and Boeing made a contract witht the governement to fly mail around the country. By 1928, Boeing had thirty percent of all air mail and passengers in the United States. Boeing went on to become very successful and in his spare time enjoyed horse racing, golf, fishing, and boating. He was also very charitable, as he wrote a personal check for the deficit of the Children's Orthopedic Hospital every year during the Great Depression. He was very modest though because he did not want his involvement known. Later, in 1950, he donated his home in the Highlands to the Hospital as well. Finally, on September 28, 1956, William Boeing died aboard his ship, the Taconite, after a long period of failing health. His son later said the Boeing "pursued his curiosity, studied things carefully, and never dismissed the novel."

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National Aviation Hall of Fame - William Boeing

National Aviation Hall of Fame - William Boeing | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Boeing purchased on of the first Martin seaplanes in 1915. Some accident damaged the plane and Boeing decided to repair it himself. A man at the nearby Bremerton Navy Yard then talked to Boeing about starting an airplane company. Because of this, the Pacific Aero Products Company was born. In 1917, this company was renamed into the Boeing Airplane Company. That year, two float biplanes were made.

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The Boeing Company

The Boeing Company | Allan Lockheed vs. William Boeing | Scoop.it

Today the Boeing Company creates new, innovative airplanes for both military and commercial use. It is the world's leading aerospace company with a net worth of $68.7 billion. Boeing does things for NASA, like managing the International Space Station, as well as supply airline companies with planes like the 737, 777, and the infamous behemoth 747. All of this is run by the President and CEO W. James McNerney, Jr.

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