All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3
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Rosanne Hawke

Rosanne Hawke | All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Rosanne Hawke Author, teacher, writing workshop facilitator, and story teller
Marcia's insight:

Soraya the storyteller is an excellent book for stage 3 exploring refugee issues and other concepts such as change, interdependence, influence of current affairs to Australian identity and its cultural diversity. In reality, many refugees are removed from communities, so children would have limited experience of them in their daily lives so the only exposure to refugees is through the mainstream media that often misrepresent them in a negative and one-dimensional perspective.

 

The first person narrative depiction of the novel gives the different personal perspectives of refugees, which will give students the opportunities to share the personal experience of refugees through the narrative. Links to syllabus outcome CUS3.3. Students will also learn about significant current of world events that affect Australian identity by looking at migration of refugee and asylum seekers.

 

Teaching ideas (literacy)

Classroom discussion about their prior knowledge of refugees. Characters and events analysis of the novel after a classroom reading. Each group will work on mini-drama play or role play assuming characters in the novel after being assigned to different sections of novel. The purpose of this activity is to help students develop empathy so that they would see other people’s perspectives that involve cognitive and affective process (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). Debriefing after the drama and role play discuss what they think and feel.Teacher introduces different types of texts such as a newspaper article dealing with the same refugees issues. Students discuss and learn the difference between narrative and factual texts by examining structure of texts, use of language and students in pairs or in group research on refugees and case studies around the world using Global Education Website resources and share their findings with a class. With a global perspectives, this activities will give them the context how the world outside is closed linked to Australia.

 

Assessment tasks

An individual student assessment: choose to produce in a format of a letter writing or artwork or poster, music or other formats that express their feelings and thoughts about what it is like to live like a refugee. The products can be sent to children at the detention centre and magazines editors for publication so students would feel connected to refugees in their real life. This helps students not only to acquire knowledge through ‘connectedness to the world’ that contributes real context beyond school (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) but also to develop literacy skills where students are involved in “listening to, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating oral, print, visual and digital texts, and using and modifying language for different purposes in a range of contexts” (ACARA, 2013). 

 

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Resources: Intangible Asset Number 82 | Australia: Intersections of identity

Resources: Intangible Asset Number 82 | Australia: Intersections of identity | All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Resources for the English Classroom. Drummer Simon Barker finds out much more than he expected about himself on this journey into Korea’s heartland.
Marcia's insight:

Intangible Asset No.82 is a beautifully-crafted documentary directed and produced by Emma Franz. It tells the story of Australian Jazz drummer Simon Barker who makes journeys to South Korea to meet Kim Seok-Chul, a shaman and grand master of traditional Korean drumming who inspires him and transforms his musical style. This film shows his understanding and appreciation of Korean drumming through deep understanding and experience of Korean cultures such as their beliefs and traditions.

 

This documentary with a global perspective is an excellent resource that can help students to expand deeper knowledge about Korean culture beyond their common association about Korean culture with ‘K-pop’ popular culture and to understand the concept of ‘culture’ as ‘dynamic and evolving’. This film is catergorised as a secondary education material for English subject but I think it can be appropriate for upper primary (Stage 3) as film highlights that different cultures are interconnected and how cultures change through interactions with other cultures through a form of art expression (links to CUS 3.4). Students will learn about traditions and belief systems in Korea and explore how two different cultures communicate with each other and create a new different artistic expression.

 

Teaching ideas

Classroom discussion through concept-map about their knowledge aboutKorea. A class discuss further about new knowledge aboutKoreaafter viewing – shamanism, shamanistic rituals, Korean drumming and traditional music.In pairs, students answer worksheet questions about the film. Invite a Guest speaker, Simon Barker to school students interview him about his experience about the journey and how his understanding about other cultures contributes to his music. School excursion to learn about Korean traditional drumming and other cultural activities at Korean Cultural Centre as part of cultural understanding.  

 

Assessment:

Students can be assessed by group research and presentation on Korean traditional drumming, Shamanism and cultural practices and how these traditions play a role in a  current contemporary Korea. 

 

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Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices

Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices | All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3 | Scoop.it

Ancient Stories, New Voices.Dust Echoes is a series of twelve animated dreamtime stories from Central Arnhem Land in Northern Australia...


Via Kerry Muste
Marcia's insight:

Dust Echoes presents a series of twelve animations of dreamtime stories from the Wugularr (Beswick) community in Central Arnhem Land inNorthern Territory. Each story delivers a symbolic meaning or morale behind, which provide students an Aboriginal perspective. Students can learn about the contributions of Aboriginal People to Australian Culture and identities by examining various aspects about such as their beliefs, kinship (links to CUS 3.3)

 

Teaching Aboriginal perspectives in education is critical as it helps students to nurture respect toward Aboriginal cultures, to develop recognition and to build reconciliation toward the harmonious Australian identity. The importance of learning Aboriginal perspectives should be dealt with great care as Prestons (2007) emphasises that the ‘white’ way of learning should be considered as a specific perspective rather than norm (Preston 2007, cited in Gilbert & Hoepper). Thus in using this resource, teachers ensure that students can draw any relevance of the story to a contemporary society they live in by understanding symbolic meanings behind the stories rather than understanding it as a farfetched myth.

 

Teaching ideas

Before viewing a dreamtime story, classroom discussion about students’ knowledge about Aboriginal culture. After a dream-time story, a class discusses the meaning, the origin of a story, the relevance to our contemporary life and learn relevant vocabularies and do quizz. Students can learn and participate in making an aboriginal painting with an Aboriginal artist in a class or excursion to a museum or aboriginal organisation that might run Aboriginal painting school programs. 

 

Assessment tasks

Students can be assessed by group presentations where each group views an assigned dreamtime story, presents the story to the class in either a drama or picture-book format and give quizzes to the class after about given storyline, its symbolic meaning and the origin of a story. This assessment is very useful to test their understanding about the story and enhances literacy skills as they learn to interpret and translate visual texts into writing or retelling the story in their own language that would be a good way of testing their comprehension of narratives for their literacy (Education Department of WA, 1994).

 

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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year | All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Now you might have been wondering why a lot of people around the world celebrated New Year on the weekend. After all wasn't New Year last month? Well it all has to do with the moon and Andrea has been finding out why.
Marcia's insight:

The video clip, Chinese New Year, can be used to examine Chinese l contributions to Australian culture and identity and to describe the cultural diversity that exists in Australia(links to CUS 3.3 and CUS 3.4). Through Chinese New Year celebration, students will learn about its celebration rituals, the history of Chinese New Year celebration, Chinese zodiac, and Chinese calendar system. Teachers also can use China DownUnder resource on NSW Curriculum Support Website that provides various teaching activities and ideas.

 

Teaching ideas

Before the clip, teachers introduce the topics through pictures. A class discuss about their knowledge and experience about Chinese New Year and further discuss their new knowledge about the celebration after the viewing. Students in pairs work on a worksheet. Teachers introduce Chinese zodiac chart and calendar table through which students understand the concept of patterns and relationships between years and zodiac animals (Numeracy).

 

Assessment tasks

Students are assessed individually where they will discover their family members’ zodiac signs and characteristics and produce a poster about their findings and share with a class. Also students can write a report or essay how their family and other cultural communities celebrate New Year or Chinese New Year and how the celebrations mean to them.

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Compass – Islam on Parade

Compass – Islam on Parade | All about cultures - HSIE Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Wahid and Susan are very much the ideal Aussie couple. They’re also devout Muslims; Wahid was born to the faith while Susan is a convert. (Video excerpt 1.58 minutesalso has educational notes. This clip chosen to be PG)
Marcia's insight:

Australian Screen website lists over 1,000 feature films and documentaries that can be utilised as excellent teaching resources for HSIE and other subject areas. Education section covers History, Identity and Culture, Environment, Society and so on. 

 

 According to Bennett et al (1999), people learn to identity and appreciate cultural difference through six different stages from denial, defence, minimisation, acceptance, adaptation to integration when they are ‘exposed to and reflect on cultural difference’. Through this resource, students will explore the diversity of the religions, learn to understand the diversity within the religious and cultural groups instead of understanding as ‘homogenous groups’ and examine how beliefs can affect different viewpoints. Links to CUS 3.3 and 3.4, the lesson examines some contemporary tensions that occur in a culturally diverse society and identifies ways in which religion influence the viewpoints people have about their own identity in Australia.  In the process, students learn to understand that cultures can lead to misunderstanding, stereotypes, racism and prejudice without developing critical understanding.

 

Two short video clips under the title of Compass – Islam on Parade offer different personal viewpoints of Muslim women on religion and hijab:

 

‘On being young Muslim inAustralia’ clip shows a personal perspective of young woman of Anglo-Saxon heritage (who converts to Muslim) about the meaning of religion. While she agrees with the presence of malpractices such as honour killing and genital mutilation within the Islamic community, she emphasises that those practices are not part of authentic religion Islam and highlights diversity within Islam.

 

‘Fashion parade with a difference’ clip presents different Muslim women of different age, different social backgrounds and educations talking about the meaning of hijab. Their personal perspectives are in a stark contrast with general prejudice and misconceptions about hijab and the religion in the mainstream culture. With our limited exposure to Islam and Islamic community, people over-rely on stereotypical and negative representation of the religion and hijab in the media where hijab is often depicted as a symbol of oppression and subjugation to men.

 

Teaching ideas

Through an analysis of the structure of visual and audio texts students can develop how to interpret and understand those texts (literacy skills): Introduce the changes in religious beliefs in Australia over the last century through pictures or video materials. Using a concept map classroom discussion about their prior knowledge about the Islam and hijab prior to the film. Revisit their prior knowledge concept map to observe any changes. After viewing the clips, students can discuss in relation to the following questions such as :In the first clip what is her cultural heritage before her conversion to Muslim? What are the negative practices observed in the Muslim community? What were the questions about hijab from the audience? Can you make an inference that there is diversity within Muslim community?  Teacher can introduce a current new article that may deal with racism against certain religious belief and students can anaylse and compare those two different visual texts and written texts presented. 

 

Assessment tasks: 

Group research presentation on their chosen/designated religions practiced in Australia includes:Religious practices, rituals, celebrations, places of worship in Sydney, clothes and food Occupations, nationals of Islam and any major Muslim influential figures locally, nationally and internationally  Any cultural and religious influences on Australian culture and our everyday life. Analyse Australian Bureau of Statistics data of religions of the past and the present within Australia, convert those data into graphs or pie charts and interpret the data, which will help students to understand the pattern and temporal relationship (numeracy). As a individual assessment, students can write an essay on the diversity of religions, its implications to society and provide any solutions to any possible conflicts. 

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